Optum buys naviHealth for reported $1 billion; Amwell raises $194 million in Series C

In non-COVID-19 news, Optum has confirmed to industry press that they have acquired post-acute management company naviHealth. Becker’s HealthIT cites sources that the purchase price is in the vicinity of $1 billion. Continuing their PAC-MAN path, this pharmacy benefit, population health, and care services wing of UnitedHealth Group in the past six months finalized the purchase of DaVita Medical Group from renal treatment giant DaVita for over $4.3 bn and is reportedly closing on a full acquisition of virtual behavioral health provider AbleTo [TTA 29 Apr] for a less stunning $470 million.

naviHealth provides post-acute care clinical decision-making tools that manage pre and post-acute care as part of value-based care programs such as the Bundled Payments for Care Improvement (BPCI) program with CMS. Their customer base includes health plans (4.5 million members within Medicare Advantage alone), over 140 hospitals, and post-acute care providers such as nursing homes, LTC facilities, rehabilitation, and home health. The company will retain current management and staff, and operate as a stand-alone company within OptumHealth. It’s a well-paid exit for Cardinal Health and Clayton, Dubilier & Rice. Also MedCityNews

Amwell raises $194 million in a second Series C. The former American Well did not need telehealth to receive a gratifying boost from its investors Allianz X and Takeda Pharmaceuticals. This follows on a February $60 million venture round from Chetrit Ventures (BostInno). Amwell has raised $711 million in nine funding rounds (Crunchbase). Their main business has been with payers, health systems, and employers. In April, they added a branded program, Amwell Private Practice, for practices under 100 providers for these mostly shuttered offices to reach their patients at home and to continue care. Release, Mobihealthnews.

News roundup: Kompaï debuts, Aging Tech 2020 study, Project Nightingale may sing to the Senate, Amwell, b.well, Lyft’s SDOH, more on telehealth for COVID-19

Believe it or not, there IS news beyond a virus!

France’s Kompaï assistance robot is finally for sale to health organizations, primarily nursing homes and hospitals. Its objective, according to its announcement release, is to help health professionals in repetitive daily tasks, and to help patients. It’s interesting that the discussion of appearance was to achieve a ‘slightly humanoid’ look, but not too human. The development process took over 10 years. (Here at TTA, Steve’s first ‘in person’ with the developers was in May 2011!) Kompaï usage mentioned is in mobility assistance and facility ‘tours’ and public guidance. Here’s Kompai in action on what looks like a tour. Press release (French/English)

Not much on robotics here. Laurie Orlov has issued her 2020 Market Overview Technology for Aging Market Overview on her Aging and Health Technology Watch, and everyone in the industry should download. Key points:

  • In 2020, aging technologies finally nudged into the mainstream
  • The older adult tech market has been recognized as an opportunity by such companies as Best Buy, Samsung, and Amazon. Medicare Advantage payers now cover some tech.
  • Advances plus smart marketing in hearing tech–one of the top needs in even younger demographics–is disrupting a formerly staid (and expensive)
  • The White House report “Emerging Technologies to Support an Aging Population” [TTA 7 March] first was an acknowledgment of its importance and two, would also serve as a great source document for entrepreneurs and developers.

The study covers the demographics of the older adult market, where they are living, caregiving, the effect of data breaches, optimizing design for this market, the impacts of voice-driven assistants, wearables, and hearables.

Project Nightingale may be singing to some US Senators. The 10 million Ascension Health identified patient records that were transferred in a BAA deal to Google [TTA 14 Nov 19], intended to build a search engine for Ascension’s EHR, continue to be looked into. They went to Google without patient or physician consent or knowledge, with major questions around its security and who had access to the data. A bipartisan group of senators is (finally) looking at this ‘maybe breach’, according to Becker’s. (Also WSJ, paywalled)

Short takes:  b.well scored a $16 million Series A for its software that integrates digital health applications for payers, providers, and employers. The round was led by UnityPoint Health Ventures….Lyft is partnering with Unite Us to provide non-emergency patient transportation to referred health appointments. Unite Us is a social determinants of health (SDOH) company which connects health and community-based social care providers….What happens if you’re a quarantined physician due to exposure to the COVID-19 virus? Use telehealth to connect to patients in EDs or in direct clinic or practice care, freeing up other doctors for hands-on care. 11 March New England Journal of Medicine….American Well is finally no more, long live Amwell. Complete with a little heart-check logo, American Well completed its long journey to a new name, to absolutely no one’s surprise. It was set to be a big reveal at HIMSS, but we know what happened there. Amwell blog, accompanied with the usual long-winded ‘marketing’ rationale They are also reporting a 10 to 20 percent increase in telehealth consults by patients (Becker’s)….Hospitals and health systems such as Spectrum Health (MI), Indiana University Health, Mount Sinai NY, St. Lukes in Bethlehem PA, and MUSC Health, are experimenting with COVID-19 virtual screenings and developing COVID-19 databases in their EHRs. The oddest: Hartford (CT) Healthcare’s drive-through screening center and virtual visit program. Is there an opportunity to cross-market with Wendy’s or Mickey D’s? After all, a burger and fries would be nice for a hungry, maybe sick, patient before they self-quarantine.

Telemedicine’s ‘missing link’ found? American Well adds Tyto Care remote diagnostics. (US)

[grow_thumb image=”https://telecareaware.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/Mom_using_on_child_ear.jpg” thumb_width=”150″ /]Telemedicine leader American Well and telehealth newcomer Tyto Care announced a new partnership that (finally) pairs up remote diagnostics to the virtual doctor visit. Patients (or parents) can use the Tyto Care device before or during the online visit to take guided exams of the heart, lungs, abdomen, ears, throat, skin and temperature which is then shared with the doctor. The releases indicate that the American Well-Tyto Care combination will be introduced first to health systems and employers. The Tyto Care examination platform and clinical data are being integrated into American Well’s telehealth platform. Timing and pricing are not disclosed, but the retail price of Tyto Care’s home model is $299.  Tyto Care, American Well releases.

Tyto Care recently obtained FDA 510(k) Class II clearance for its digital stethoscope snap-on to the main device to monitor heart and lung sounds. [TTA 2 Nov] The all-in-one type device also includes attachments for a digital imaging otoscope for ear exams, a throat scope, a skin camera and thermometer swipe. A new and quite comprehensive demo video of Tyto Care on its own platform is viewable on YouTube, which includes how a doctor can review the information during a live video visit, or as a store-and-forward exam. Tyto Care is also introducing a professional version of its device and platform.

Tyto Care has also made it to the finals of The Best of Baby Tech (a/k/a The Bump) Awards, which include a new version of the awww-worthy Owlet smart sock baby monitor, the Edwin the Duck child learning tool, TempTraq’s continuous temperature monitor and the SNOO smart sleeper. They will be exhibited with 13 other finalists at CES 2017 in the Bump Pavilion at the Baby Tech Showcase 5-8 January, with winners in six categories on the 5th. #babytechces