News roundup: cybersecurity benchmarking study, Tyto Care’s Home Smart Clinic, Long Island’s $2.6B life sciences hub, Singapore’s Speedoc raises $28M, NantHealth’s sinking feeling, Hims & Hers revenue up 95%

Censinet, the American Hospital Association (AHA), and KLAS Research announced at industry confab CHIME22 Fall Forum a benchmarking study on health system cybersecurity. The study, currently enrolling hospital and health system participants, according to the release will enable a comparison of cybersecurity investments, resources, performance, and maturity to peer organizations across key operational cyber metrics. It will also cover NIST Cybersecurity Framework (NIST CSF) and Health Industry Cybersecurity Practices (HICP). Censinet provides healthcare risk management solutions, consolidating enterprise risk management and operations capabilities. Hat tip to HISTalk 9 Nov.

TytoCare’s latest is the rollout of the Home Smart Clinic, a platform that combines TytoCare’s FDA-cleared handheld for remote physical exams; Tyto Insights, their AI-powered diagnostic support that aids diagnosis in remote physical exams; Tyto Engagement Labs, a suite of user engagement services including behavioral science-backed blueprints, consulting services, and marketing tailored to each specific program and cohort; and support for multiple provider models and different patient populations. The new platform is targeted to health plans and providers. Release (Yahoo)

Long Island NY’s proposed Midway Crossing project, creating a life sciences hub in quaintly named Ronkonkoma, would cost about $2.55 billion, but create an estimated 4,300 science, technology, engineering, and healthcare positions. They’d also be lucrative, with salaries mostly well over $100,000 a year. The proposal was authored (sic) by Michael Dowling, president of Northwell Health, and James Hayward, PhD, president and CEO of Applied DNA Sciences, and appeared in Newsday (paywalled). Its 179 acres would include a STEM educational center, research labs, biotech manufacturing facilities, health care offices, a hotel and convention center plus connect to the LIRR and Long Island-MacArthur airport. While approved by local authorities, it now needs funding. Becker’s

Traveling to the far Pacific…Speedoc, a home health company based in Singapore, raised $28 million. Speedoc offers app-based video consults and home visits, non-emergency ambulance transport, and remote monitoring for several chronic conditions. It is available in nine cities in Singapore and Malaysia. According to Mobihealthnews, it is also one of the technology partners for the two-year pilot of the Mobile Inpatient Care@Home initiative by the Ministry of Health’s Office for Healthcare Transformation. The pre-Series B funding round was led by its new investors Bertelsmann Investments, Shinhan Venture investment, and Mars Growth. Vertex Ventures Southeast Asia & India, which led its $5 million Series A funding round in 2020, also participated. 

Our Readers with very long memories will remember that transformative health darling, NantHealth. This Patrick Soon-Shiong NantWorks company, originally in genetic sequencing for cancer research, was caught en flagrante in a ‘pay to play’ scheme with the University of Utah funding NantHealth and providing data that would prove useful to other Soon-Shiong companies [TTA 18 April 2017]. It’s long since pivoted to payer/provider data solutions (NaviNet). What’s not improved is their bottom line. It lost $13.7 million, or $0.12 cents per share, increasing loss by 26% from 3Q 2021. Shares on NasdaqGS are trading at $0.31. Yahoo!Finance/SimplyWallSt. Another tip of the cap to HISTalk 9 Nov.

And who said all of telehealth is suffering? Online direct-to-consumer marketer Hims & Hers posted a third consecutive $100 million+ quarter in revenue. Their Q3 revenue was up 95% versus Q3 last year, reaching $144.8 million. They also gained 70,000 new online subscribers for a total of 991,000, up 80% year over year. Q4 guidance is up to $159 million to $162 million, with a full-year revenue forecast of $519 million to $522 million. And yes–they’re profitable. Their embarrassing TV spots notwithstanding, they seem to have found The Magic Formula. FierceHealthcare

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