TTA’s Last Swing of Summer: CVS wins $8B Signify auction, Amazon-One Medical gets FTC look-see, UHG/Change decision now Oct, Holmes files motions before sentencing, keeping digital treatment tools safe by design, more!

 

Weekly Update

Back from Two Weeks in Another Town (except for a few extra days), the August-September ‘quiet time’ certainly was not. CVS’ big win in Signify’s auction was on Labor Day. Change may or may not be joining UHG/Optum after October. FTC doesn’t much like Amazon’s acquisitions, including One Medical. And Elizabeth Holmes’ legal team was busily filing–and delaying the (maybe) inevitable, including a declaration straight out of Perry Mason.

The passing of a Queen and crowning of a King.

Elizabeth Holmes’ three swings and a miss in overturning her trial verdict reveal a crafty strategy (She’ll be in court long after Sunny Balwani toddles off to prison)
News briefs, catchup edition: UnitedHealth/Change decision October?, CVS wins $8B Signify Health auction, Walgreens majority buy of CareCentrix, FTC requests more info on Amazon-One Medical (Home care wars and a long-awaited decision)
Perspectives: Creating consistent standards isn’t a once and done job (the safety of digital treatment tools)
On the passing of HM Queen Elizabeth II

$130M to Alma’s mental health platform, Cadence Care RPM with ScionHealth, NIH funding telehealth in cancer care, and more.

News roundup: RPM at 79 ScionHealth hospitals, 74% of employers like virtual care despite concerns, Alma Health garners $130M, NIH’s $25M for cancer care telehealth research, Parks’ virtual Connected Health Summit 30-31 Aug

Amazon threw in its beach towel on Care, put its bets on One (Medical), and paddle up in Signify’s auction closing after Labor Day. Babylon Health is eliminating distractions with the NHS to concentrate on the US. Oracle’s hit with charges of massive privacy violations, on top of massive Cerner VA dysfunctionality. But back to the future–Fitbit’s reviving with three new fitness watches.

Oracle in Federal court class-action lawsuit on global privacy violations; Cerner VA EHR had 498 major outage incidents, 7% of time since rollout (Misery upon misery)
Week-end news roundup: Fitbit revives with 3 new watches, Sena Health hospital-at-home, SteadyMD surveys telehealth clinicians, 9.4% fewer adult dental visits in England, save the date for ATA 2023
Perspectives: why digital apps need an in-house clinical safety lead (A Perspective from Wysa, more to come in September)
Breaking: Amazon Care shutting down after three years–what’s next? (updated) (Care an expensive course at the University of Healthcare Delivery)
Babylon Health exits last NHS hospital contract as a ‘distraction’, looks to US market for growth (Tighten your seatbelts)
Signify Health bidding war ensues, waged by Amazon, UnitedHealth Group, CVS, Option Care Health (A scrum with unknown outcome)

An action-packed mid-August. No one seems to be sitting on the beach unless you’ve been laid off. Meanwhile, companies are scrambling. No, Babylon Health is not being bought. But elsewhere, there is some good news around acquisitions and funding. 

Rounding up the week with good news: AliveCor’s Series F round, Scotland’s Smplicare gains £750K for fall research (A needed and refreshing drink!)
Friday short takes: was there a bidding war for One Medical? A concussion risk wearable tested. Get Well’s monkeypox digital care plan (One Medical’s gamble and a return to one of our old follow topics)
Week-end news roundup: +Oscar data tech platform pauses, BD buys MedKeeper pharmatech for $93M, Novant’s Meta misconfiguration reveals PHI, Mt Sinai’s Sema4 genomics spinoff releases 250 + founder (Reality bites in a lot of different areas)
Babylon Health: fending off bubbly rumors of acquisition this week (No, they’re not. Being. Bought.)

Big companies eager to snap up companies to fill out portfolios. Small (and not so small) companies drastically cutting staff and spending, looking for the Magic Survival Formula. Amwell finally closing a Big Deal with CVS Health. Babylon Health’s mixed picture as they grow. Cerner and VA’s miseries continue, but data and IoMT breaches thrive. And ISfTeH not only returns to live conferences, but also comes to the US.

Weekend short takes: May telehealth claims up to 5.4%; three health plan breaches, one at its law firm–affecting over 400,000 patients; layoffs hit Calm, Truepill (updated)
ISfTeH Global Connections for Sustainable Telehealth: 6-7 November, San Jose (International telehealth finally reaches the US)
Week-end news roundup: Allscripts on the acquisition hunt, Amwell’s CVS telehealth deal, Cerner’s $1.8M racial discrimination settlement, predicting Parkinson’s progression via smartwatch data
Mid-week news roundup: CVS eyeing Signify Health for in-home/VBC (updated); Babylon Health mixed pic of revenue and losses up; Geisinger doubles telemed specialties; connected IoT devices expand cyber-insecurity footprint; Owlet layoffs
More Oracle-Cerner VA/DOD EHR misery with 4 hour+ outage; 51% of VA iPads unused for video appointments (Not only VA’s
EHR, but also inventory management gone sideways)

This week’s big news centered on Oracle’s layoffs at Cerner–and Oracle–DOJ versus UnitedHealth Group, and telehealth nearing needed legislative change in the US. In UK news, NHS Digital trials wireless to compensate for looming staff shortages–and Cera raises £264 million. Advances in dementia diagnosis and therapy plus news from all over: multiple raises, VA, Cionic, Withings, Orion Health, Coviu, and more!

Week-end wrapup: CVS plans to expand primary care, home health; Cera Care raises £264M; Linus Health’s AI enabled dementia screener, Cognito’s cognitive therapy slows brain atrophy
Short takes for Thursday: Diagnostic Robotics $45M raise; Sage’s $9M seed; VA names EHR ‘functional champion’; Aussie telehealth startup Coviu arrives in US
NHS Digital trialling Wireless Center of Excellence–in face of ‘crisis’ level staffing shortages (Can one compensate for the other?)
Mid-week roundup: UnitedHealth-Change trial kicks off; Amazon’s One Medical buy questioned; Cionic’s neural sleeve designed by Yves Behar; Medable-Withings partner; Orion Health’s new CEO; IBM Watson Health’s Simon Hawken passes (Line up your bets on DOJ vs UHG)
Telehealth waivers take critical step in extending to 2024 in House bill now passed (About time, Congress)
Oracle’s Big Vision will be missing a lot of people; layoffs hit Cerner, customer experience, marketing staff (Didn’t take long for the guillotine to fall)

The news for this week is a mix of some good and some not-so. Oracle’s new sheriff moves to fix Cerner’s VA EHR problems, quickly. Investment is reviving, led by Amazon’s buying One Medical, Cleerly, and 3M’s 2023 healthcare spinoff. But Teladoc continues its losing streak. Health plans are shedding real estate and holdings. Also shedding are unicorns–Babylon Health, Included Health, and Noom.

Week-end roundup of not-good news: Teladoc’s Q2 $3B net loss, shares down 24%; Humana, Centene, Molina reorg and downscale; layoffs at Included Health, Capsule, Noom, Kry/Livi, Babylon Health, more (Hit by both telehealth and tech downturns)
Weekend investment/divestment roundup: 3M to spin off Health Care, Cleerly’s $223M Heartbeat, Elation’s $50M Series D, Health Note’s $17M Series A, Galen bought by RLDatix (A revival?)
Oracle’s ‘new sheriff’ moving to fix Cerner EHR implementation in the VA: the Senate hearing (High Noon at VA?)
Amazon moves to acquire One Medical provider network for $3.9B (revised) (Another worry for providers)

Having survived heat waves on both sides of the pond, the news is emerging from its lull. The most significant is around Oracle Health sunsetting the Cerner brand, which frankly has become a bit tarnished. Some of it is about staff cuts and hack attacks piling up, for different reasons in the US and UK. Other news is encouraging in that investment and business are moving forward, despite the parlous state of the markets.

Special congratulations to Herts Careline on its 40th birthday! 

Week-end news roundup: Fold Health launches OS ‘stack’; admin task automator Olive cuts 450 workers; 38% of UK data breaches from cyber, internal attacks; hacking 80% of US healthcare breaches; does AI threaten cybersecurity?
VA’s final, troubling OIG ‘unknown queue’ report on Cerner Millenium rollout; Oracle’s Sicilia to testify before Senate today (Oracle’s inherited mess)
Herts Careline marks 40th Anniversary (Congratulations!)
Midweek heat wave roundup: GE Healthcare’s new name, hospital-to-home health trending big, over 2 million patient records hacked (Hint: GEHC doesn’t have to change the brochures right away)
Cerner’s business now consolidated under Oracle Health (Excuse Cerner as it disappears–but save the swag for eBay!)

 


Have a job to fill? Seeking a position? See jobs listed with our new job search partner Jooble in the right sidebar!


Read Telehealth and Telecare Aware: https://telecareaware.com/  @telecareaware

Follow our pages on LinkedIn and on Facebook

We thank our present and past advertisers and supporters: Legrand/Tynetec, Eldercare, UK Telehealthcare, NYeC, PCHAlliance, ATA, The King’s Fund, DHACA, HIMSS, Health 2.0 NYC, MedStartr, Parks Associates, and HealthIMPACT.

Reach international leaders in health tech by advertising your company or event/conference in TTA–contact Donna for more information on how we help and who we reach. 


Telehealth & Telecare Aware: covering the news on latest developments in telecare, telehealth, telemedicine, and health tech, worldwide–thoughtfully and from the view of fellow professionals

Thanks for asking for update emails. Please tell your colleagues about this news service and, if you have relevant information to share with the rest of the world, please let me know.

Donna Cusano, Editor In Chief
donna.cusano@telecareaware.com

– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

News briefs, catchup edition: UnitedHealth/Change decision October?, CVS wins $8B Signify Health auction, Walgreens majority buy of CareCentrix, FTC requests more info on Amazon-One Medical

Your Editor is semi-returned from Almost Two Weeks in Another Town, with a few more days to close out September (and summer into autumn) coming up. A lot of big news broke despite the usually slow Labor Day holiday week.

UnitedHealthcare Group/Change Healthcare Federal lawsuit to be decided in October–reports. The bench trial in the US District Court in Washington DC pitted the Department of Justice and state plaintiffs against UHG’s massive $13 billion acquisition of claims and EDI/data processing giant Change. It concluded 16 August with closing arguments presented 8 September. Dealreporter via Seeking Alpha reported that UHG and Change effectively countered DOJ’s antitrust objections to the acquisition. Change Healthcare had previously sold their claims editing business to TPG Capital to ease antitrust concerns.  Whether that will be enough in the current environment with greater sensitivities around healthcare consolidation remains to be seen. If approved, Change will be folded into OptumInsight. For a deeper dive into the issues, see TTA’s earlier reporting 3 August and 23 March.

CVS Health beat out other contenders with an $8 billion cash bid for Signify Health. It was a busy Labor Day for CVS as Signify’s board met and decided that day on CVS’ cash offer of $30.50 per share in their unusual auction. Amazon, UnitedHealth Group, and little-known Option Care Health were the other bidders. Signify is a strategic boost for CVS in becoming a major player in primary care, provider enablement, and home health as we’ve summarized here from CVS’ Q2 earnings call. Signify’s capabilities in in-home health delivery and provider services were cheaper to buy than to develop. Based on the weight given to it in the CVS release, Signify’s Caravan Health and their Medicare ACOs furnishing value-based care management services to 170 providers was a significant factor in the top price paid.

New Mountain Capital and their investors own 60% of Signify and will be exiting. Signify had in July announced their own exit from the costly and problematic Episodes of Care/BPCI business acquired with Remedy Partners back in 2019. This led to most of the over 480 staff layoffs announced last month. The sale is, as usual, pending regulatory approvals and isn’t expected to close until first half 2023. Kyle Armbrester, Signify’s CEO Kyle Armbrester will continue to lead the company as part of CVS Health. Healthcare Finance, FierceHealthcare

Rival Walgreens Boots Alliance completed their acquisition of a majority share of home care coordination platform CareCentrix. Walgreens’ final payment was $330 million for 55% of the company at an $800 million valuation. As noted previously, Walgreens ‘go big or go home’ strategy in primary care kicked off in 2020 with growing investments in VillageMD, culminating in last year’s $5.2 billion for 63% of the company. The plan is to co-locate Village Medical offices with 600 Walgreens locations by 2025 [TTA 14 Oct 2021]. CVS’ recent actions can be seen as a reaction to Walgreens’ aggressive moves. Healthcare Finance

Amazon now under FTC scrutiny for One Medical acquisition. If shutting down the much-publicized Amazon Care wasn’t quite enough last month, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) will be reviewing Amazon’s $3.9 billion buy of One Medical. This was announced in a 1Life Healthcare (parent of One Medical) 8-K filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). Both 1Life and Amazon received requests for additional information on 2 September, above and beyond the usual required Hart-Scott-Rodino Act (HSR) reports that will be reviewed by the FTC and DOJ. Effectively it extends the HSR waiting period by 30 days after One Medical and Amazon have substantially complied with the additional information ‘second request’.

The FTC isn’t winning popularity contests with Amazon’s legal department, as the agency is reviewing their acquisition of iRobot, maker of robot vacuum cleaners. Mobihealthnews

Breaking: Amazon Care shutting down after three years–what’s next? (updated)

Amazon Care to cease operations after 31 December. Amazon Health Services is throwing in the towel on its primary care service for enterprise customers, after failing to make much headway with its mix of virtual care, in-home, and telehealth services. An internal email from Neil Lindsay, Amazon Health Services senior vice president, sent today (24 Aug) to employees but leaked to the press, stated that “This decision wasn’t made lightly and only became clear after many months of careful consideration. Although our enrolled members have loved many aspects of Amazon Care, it is not a complete enough offering for the large enterprise customers we have been targeting, and wasn’t going to work long-term.”

Employees who have been part of Amazon Care may have the opportunity to transfer to other parts of Health Services, according to the memo, or will be ‘supported’ in finding other roles within or outside the company. The total number of employees was not disclosed, but this Editor expects layoffs to be announced by the fall as Amazon Care winds down.

Amazon has been moving in a different direction with enterprises for some months. Reportedly the decision was made to ditch Amazon Care prior to agreeing to acquire One Medical, which was announced late in July. However, recently revealed negotiations actually started last February, with One Medical pitting Amazon against CVS until CVS dropped its bid effort [TTA 19 August]. 

As this Editor noted last month with the One Medical acquisition, “…for this Editor it is clear that Amazon with One Medical is buying itself into in-person and virtual primary care for the employer market, where it had limited success with its present largely virtual offering, and entreé with commercial plans and MA.” With One Medical, they will be acquiring an operation with 790,000 patients (including 40,000 at-risk, presumably Iora’s), 8,000 company clients, 125 physical offices in 21 US metros (including projected), and an established telehealth/telemedicine protocol. In other words, a ready-made provider and enterprise base to build on and sell into, for instance Amazon products like Pharmacy and PillPack.

Not addressed is what will be done, if anything, to transition current employer agreements for Amazon Care to One Medical.

It’s now a matter of whether HHS, DOJ, and FTC will agree to the buy or ask for additional divestitures. One conflict–Amazon Care–has just been removed. And this may clear the deck for other acquisitions, such as Signify Health [TTA 24 Aug], if Amazon wins the auction against CVS, UnitedHealth Group, and Option Care Health, though for a newcomer to healthcare Signify may very well be A Bridge Too Far.

What’s in play?

  • One Medical’s Iora Health and its high needs/high costs Medicare patient base. This has very much been held in the background, leading this Editor to think it will be sold to another health plan.
  • The status of the previous agreement with Crossover Health for 115,000 Amazon employees and dependents, delivered through their employer-based onsite clinics in 11 states in addition to concierge care [TTA 17 May]
  • Another previous agreement with Ginger for telemental health, only announced last week.

Amazon was touting Amazon Care as recently as earlier this year to shareholders. They had acquired employers outside Amazon such as Hilton, but not quickly enough. Expansion talk and the usual touting within the industry weren’t happening. There was an ‘air of mystery’ about what Amazon Care was doing, going back to the beginning.

Perhaps a major ‘tell’ was that Kristen Helton, general manager in charge of Amazon Care, was reported two weeks ago by Bloomberg News to be taking an “extended break to spend the summer with her family.” She had been in the GM position for three years after joining Amazon in 2015.

Count Amazon Care as one expensive learning course in the insanely costly University of Healthcare Delivery. This won’t be the first lesson, but Amazon can afford the tuition.

Geek Wire, FierceHealthcare

Signify Health bidding war ensues, waged by Amazon, UnitedHealth Group, CVS, Option Care Health

What a difference less than two weeks makes. We noted on 11 August that in-home health and value-based provider services company Signify Health was up for sale in an unusual auction, with CVS Health the first disclosed bidder. Yesterday, three more companies jumped into the mix, UnitedHealth Group (the 9,000 elephant of US health), Amazon (with One Medical still pending), and little-known Option Care Health, a public (Nasdaq: OPCH) home infusion care company.

Reports in the Wall Street Journal (paywalled) indicate Signify’s value in the auction may top $8 billion. Bids are due around Labor Day. The board will be meeting next Monday to discuss the bids to date. Signify’s current value is about $5 billion.

The share price closed today just above $27, a major rise from last week’s close of $21 (Yahoo Finance).

The UHG bid is above $30, with Amazon close by, according to Bloomberg News sources. The CVS bid is not known. A buy by Amazon would put the company in Instant Major Healthcare Player territory. This Editor believes that with UHG and CVS, antitrust may factor in, especially considering Signify’s recent ownership of the ACO MSO Caravan Health.  

Option Care may not be well known, but it has impressive backing from Goldman Sachs and has been profitable. Their interest is Signify’s home health network and access to providers through Caravan. Another backer, Walgreens Boots Alliance, just sold 11 million shares on the secondary market, reducing its holdings from 20.5 percent to approximately 14.4 percent.

There’s no bar, of course, to the board ending the auction at any time and awarding the company. Healthcare Finance, FierceHealthcare

Mid-week news roundup (updated 18 Aug): CVS eyeing Signify Health for in-home/VBC; Babylon Health mixed pic of revenue and losses up; Geisinger doubles telemed specialties; connected IoT devices expand cyber-insecurity (more); Owlet layoffs

CVS has dropped another sandal as to their quest to add primary care and home health to their portfolio [TTA 5 Aug]. Reports indicates that CVS Health is bidding to acquire Signify Health, which is up for sale. Signify is best known as a major provider of in-home health care in both evaluations and community-based services, with users such as health plans, health systems, community groups, non-profits, and government. In March, they added provider value-based care with Caravan Health, a mid-sized Accountable Care Organization (ACO) management service organization (MSO), for $250 million.  This would give CVS both leverage in in-home care and access to value-based care models in health systems and practices, adding a network of jumbo (100,000 lives+) ACOs to Aetna’s 500 ACOs.

Signify did take a bit of a bath with its acquisition/merger of Remedy Partners in 2019 which marked their entry into the Federal shared savings programs around Episodes of Care. While it created a $600 million company. Remedy’s Episodes of Care in the CMS Bundled Payments for Care Improvement (BPCI) program was always problematic for Signify on multiple levels (Editor’s experience). Signify announced its exit from the successor BPCI-A (Advanced) model last month to concentrate on home care and the Caravan business. The wind-down, which will take some time as these are Federal programs through CMS, will save Signify about $115-120 million in costs, compared to their annual direct and shared costs of $145 million. Restructuring costs such as severance may be only $35 million. After IPO-ing in February 2021 at $24 per share, it has only recently climbed to $23, having recently hit a 52-week low of $10.70. FierceHealthcare, HealthcareFinanceNews

Updated Perhaps in preparation for acquisition, Signify Health is shedding 489 people starting 1 October, including 45 in Connecticut, with the remainder in Texas, South Dakota, and New York. The information comes from required notices to the Connecticut Department of Labor. The majority of employees affected are remote workers. It appears to be related to Signify’s winding up of BPCI and Episodes of Care activity which are likely on calendar year contracts. The legacy company, Remedy Partners, had been headquartered in Connecticut with staff in New York. Moving forward with layoffs now makes the company more attractive for sale, as the separation expenses will not be an acquiring company liability. The 1 October start date is also a tell.  CT Insider, Becker’s

A mixed picture for Babylon Health. Its Q2 results were up substantially in revenue–4.6x year-over-year from $57.5 million to $265.4 million–along with key indicators such as US members up 220% and a 7.5% improvement in medical margins over three quarters. The US has been very very good to Babylon with value-based care membership growing 3.2x year-on-year to a total of approximately 269,000 US VBC members with 40% of its VBC revenue from Medicare contracts. However, losses are up along with growth–$157.1 million compared to $64.9 million loss PY. Babylon at end of July announced worldwide layoffs of at least 100 people of its current 2,500 in their bid to save $100 million in Q3. Babylon release, Mobihealthnews

Geisinger Health was one of the pioneers in telehealth and remote patient monitoring, from ur-days in the early 2010s to today. Much of its patient base in Pennsylvania is rural or semi-rural, living well away from care centers, with a clinician base equally scattered. They went with a single system–Teladoc–integrated into Epic. By the early days of the pandemic, Geisinger was able to expand their telehealth coverage from 20 to more than 70 specialties, 200 providers to more than 2,000 providers, and over two years (2020-2022) completing over 784,000 telehealth visits to homes, local clinics, or local hospitals. Case study in HealthcareITNews

If you’re a health system CIO managing lots of connected devices, you may need to go to a psychiatrist with your feelings of insecurity. That’s the gist of a new report, the Insecurity of Connected Devices in Healthcare 2022. A new-to-this-Editor cybersecurity firm, Cynerio, partnered with researchers at the Ponemon Institute to survey 517 executives at US health systems to find that their Internet of Medical Things (IoMT)/Internet of Things (IoT) vulnerabilities haven’t changed much since this Editor banged the gong about them well before the pandemic:

  • Cyberattacks–frequent: 56% of respondents experienced 1+ cyberattacks in the past 24 months involving IoMT/IoT devices; 58% averaged 9+ cyberattacks. Adverse impacts on patient care were reported by 45% and 53% of those resulted in increased mortality rates. 24% of hospitals noted an impact on their mortality rates.
  • Data breaches are routine: 43% of hospitals had one in the past two years
  • Risks may be high, but the reaction is sluggish: 71% rated security risks as high or very high, but only 21% report a mature stage of proactive security actions. 46% performed accepted procedures such as scanning for devices, but only 33% keep inventory.
  • Ka-ching! Goes the ransomware! When attacked, 47% paid the ransom, and 32% were in the $250-500,000 range.

The full report is available for download here. Those who prefer a webinar must wait till 17 August at 2pm (EDT)–registration hereCynerio release, HealthcareITNews

Updated. Having sat in on the webinar, some further information points from the Ponemon survey deepen the ‘gravity of the risk’:

  • IoT is different because a hack or cyberransoming prevents the device from working. It isn’t fixed by backup as data can be.
  • Health systems are still using IoT computer systems running Windows XT/95–and earlier (!)
  • The average total cost of the largest data breaches is $13 million–the most common cost is in the $1-5 million range. 
  • 88% of these data breaches involved at least one IoT/MT device
  • Risks are known, but action is lagging. 72% of health organizations report a high level of urgency in securing devices–yet 67% of organizations do not keep an inventory of IoT/IoMT devices that they scan
  • 79% don’t consider their activities to be ‘mature’
  • Security investment doesn’t reflect the gravity of the risk–only 3.4% of IT budgets focus on IoT/MT device security.

And in sad layoff news, Owlet Baby Care is shedding an unknown number of employees. Here is the notice on LinkedIn. We noted their FDA problems and a fast pivot last in February, but their going public via a SPAC has been rocky at best with shares lingering at $2 from the IPO at $8. Marketing a pricey baby monitor direct to consumer is expensive, even if it meets a need, and this is likely a cash crunch. At least the ‘leader of people & culture’ is giving them a proper sendoff of thanks–and more usefully, providing their contact information for potential job openings with other companies.

[This is in contrast to the gone-viral spectacle of the CEO of something called HyperSocial posting on LinkedIn his angst about laying off staff–along with a selfie of him weeping. Not exactly confidence-making and All About Him. This Editor’s comment is one of 6,000-odd posts which are largely doubtful to negative.]

Friday’s really quick takes: Oracle-Cerner starts Federal reviews, Curve Health, Signify buys Caravan, and a gaggle of single name companies!

The long and winding road of Federal scrutiny–and other legal actions–begin for Oracle and Cerner. To be expected, the first hurdle is a review under the Hart-Scott-Rodino Act, by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and the US Department of Justice (DOJ). This should conclude by 22 February. The Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) is also reviewing. As is routine in takeovers of public companies, there are seven civil filings by ‘supposed’ Cerner stockholders in either the District Court for the Southern or Eastern District of New York, their favorite venue, all claiming lack of information. Expect more. Kansas City Business Journal (which may be paywalled), Becker’s Health IT

New York-based newcomer Curve Health scored a $12 million Series A from Morningside Ventures with participation from Alumni Ventures and Recover-Care Healthcare, as well as returning investors Lightspeed Venture Partners, IDEO, Inflect Health, and others. Total funding is now $18 million (Crunchbase). Curve Health specializes in ‘virtual hospital’ telemedicine for skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) and community paramedicine, along with billing and health information exchange. Last July, they partnered with CareConnectMD, a California-based provider group that delivers value-based care for people living in nursing homes via its High Needs Direct Contracting Entity (DCE). Curve’s founder, Tim Peck MD, previously founded Call 9, a telemedicine/onsite service for nursing homes, which closed in July 2019 [TTA 15 May 2020] Release

Signify Health, a senior home care and value-based care provider, is acquiring ACO organizer and management services provider Caravan Health in a $250 million cash/stock deal with contingent additional payments of up to $50 million based on performance. Caravan’s founder and the current CEO will be joining Signify. It’s a move that may bolster Signify, which has had a few valuation challenges, because it expands Signify’s provider base and expands its current narrow episodes of care area (the former Remedy) into additional advanced payment models. Release, Mobihealthnews

Short short takes on single-word company news….

Expressable’s remote speech teletherapy platform closed a $15 million Series A funded by F-Prime Capital and including existing investors Lerer Hippeau, NextView Ventures, and Amplifyher Ventures. The new funding will go towards national expansion. FierceHealthcare  Hat tip to this Editor’s former colleague Amy VanStee, who recently joined them.

Balanced is a new digital platform for exercise coaching targeted to older adults. Users can modify based on assessed fitness level, input injuries, health conditions, and fitness goals. They added to an early seed round to total $6.5 million in seed funding, led by Founders Fund and Primary Venture Partners, with participation from Lux Capital and Stellation Capital. Cost for unlimited use is a gentle $20 per month. Given yesterday’s near-implosion of that expensive must-have of the aggressively fit and heavily dripping, Peloton, is fitness getting real?  Mobihealthnews

AndHealth, founded by the CEO plus veterans from CoverMyMeds, now has $57 million from Francisco Partners, with participation from the American Medical Association’s venture capital arm Health 2047, Kirkland & Ellis and Twofold Ventures. AndHealth specializes in Virtual Centers of Excellence (VCOE) programs for migraine and autoimmune disease reversal programs as an employer-sponsored benefit. Release

Berlin-based Ada extended its Series B by $30 million for a total of $120 million. Ada partners with major pharma for its AI-assisted symptom assessment app. TechEU

Nurx is merging into Thirty Madison. Nurx is primarily a provider of birth control, women’s and sexual health meds via telemedicine, while Thirty Madison specializes in telemedicine for chronic conditions. Thirty Madison was valued at over $1 billion after its Series C round in June. Nurx’s lines will be added to Thirty Madison’s menu which includes Keeps (hair loss) and Evens (GI issues). FierceHealthcare

CareCentrix files ‘corporate espionage’ on trade secrets lawsuit against Signify Health, former employee

Usually, laundry like this is not aired or dried in public, but it’s on the line nevertheless in a lawsuit. CareCentrix, a post-acute care/transitions of care management company, has sued in US Federal Court for the District of Delaware both Signify Health, a diversified home care company overlapping the same line of business, and CareCentrix’s former general manager, VP post-acute care Marcus Lanznar.  Initial charges were filed on 23 December and motions are piling up fast based on what is listed (paywalled, unfortunately) on PacerMonitor.

The Federal charge is covered under the Defend Trade Secrets Act of 2016 (DTSA), Cause 18:1836(a) Injunction against Misappropriation of Trade Secrets. The basics are that Mr. Lanznar was a senior executive of CareCentrix, had access to proprietary information, and had a restrictive covenant that would not allow him to go to a competitor for nine months. Yet he was engaged in interviews starting in July 2020, by August-September was having regular meetings with his counterpart, chief product officer Peter Boumenot, and passed CareCentrix information not only to his personal email but also to Signify into October, when Mr. Lanznar resigned. He joined Signify Health in November 2020 and is listed on LinkedIn as SVP product, though not on their management page. 

The lawsuit claims that Signify “targeted, recruited, and hired former CareCentrix executive Marcus Lanznar in a covert scheme that succeeded in providing access to CareCentrix’s confidential information and trade secrets” and also was aware of the conflict presented by the restrictive covenant. It seeks to prevent Mr. Lanznar and Signify Health from using its trade secrets and to award it damages and attorneys’ fees. 

This is a David versus Goliath matchup. Signify Health in February had a highly successful IPO gaining over $560 million and is valued with a market cap of over $7 bn. CareCentrix to date is most definitely the David in this scenario in terms of size, having raised all private equity funding via Summit Partners starting in 2011. However, it has made two acquisitions of its own recently: Vesta Healthcare at $30 million and Turnkey Health for an undisclosed amount (Crunchbase). The stakes are piled high in this hot segment of healthcare. 

There are a number of high-powered law firms dueling in this lawsuit, which also includes CareCentrix’s parent, NDES Holdings. Note: this article is based on both reporting in Healthcare IT News, which initially filed the story, and FierceHealthcare’s close on follow-up.

News and deal roundup, 5 March: Oscar Health’s $1.4 billion IPO, telehealth expansion in Congress, what people *really* do during a telehealth visit

What a difference a month makes in a blazing healthcare market. ‘Neoinsurer’ Oscar Health went public on Tuesday, selling over 37 million shares at $39 each, reaping an eyeblinking $1.44 bn. While shares took a tumble on Wednesday and Thursday, closing at just above $32, the valuation of the company could be anywhere between $7.92 and $9.5 bn (calculating in options and the like). Quite a difference from the estimate in early February, which was a modest–and as now we know, totally sandbagged–$100 million [TTA 9 Feb]. A lovely payday for their backers and all at Oscar who had stock grants, indeed.

As we’ve seen from recent IPOs, they have all been underestimated (e.g. Signify Health’s $100 million filing transubstantiated into $561 million). The downward glide slope in share price is typical. Whether it will rise will depend very much on strong results for this quarter, half year, and full year as Oscar presses harder into the competitive Medicare Advantage, exchange, and small group markets. How they, and all the other payers do, will be dependent on health policy permutations and emanations from the DC Swamp. CNBC, TechCrunch, FierceHealthcare

Speaking of the DC Swamp, telehealth expansion is enjoying real traction in Congress and with Health and Human Services (HHS). The chair of the House Health Subcommittee, Rep. Anna Eshoo (D-Calif.) has called for many of the flexibilities on payments and locations granted temporarily during the pandemic’s liberalization of coverage to be made permanent. These affect Medicare and other types of Federal payments. [Review of the 2021 Medicare Physician Fee Schedule re telehealth here]  They expire after the public health emergency (PHE), extended in January to end of April, so a clock is ticking, quickly.

The basics are that Congress must pass legislation that removes restrictions on geography (currently rural only) and permits the patient home to be used as a ‘distant site’. Advocates also want to add to Medicare telehealth coverage hospice and home dialysis care, more types of eligible care providers such as physical therapists and other allied health professionals, and audio-only (telephonic) consults. Others are pushing for reinstating HIPAA compliance for telehealth platforms.

The Telehealth Modernization Bill that covers most of the above was introduced on 23 February in both the Senate and House, in a rare show of both bipartisanship and bicamerality. (Excluded: telephonic consults, HIPAA compliance) Rep. Eshoo’s remarks were made during last Tuesday’s Committee on Energy and Commerce Health Subcommittee hearing.

HHS is also backing this, based on HHS’ Office of the Inspector General’s recent statement praising the expansion of telehealth. Recognizing that concerns have been raised about ‘telefraud’, IG Christi Grimm noted that they have been vigorously prosecuting fraudulent claims [TTA 2 Oct 20] with telehealth being used in a broad sense for billing other goods and services such as medications and durable medical equipment. FierceHealthcare, Healthcare Dive, ATA News 26 Feb

Speaking of telehealth visits, what do the patients do during them? This Editor had filed away, waiting for an opportune moment to share it, a surprising study by DrFirst, a mobile telehealth and communications platform. It was conducted online during the Pits of the Pandemic (June 2020). It may not surprise you that most patients weren’t fully engaged in the process. Bored, isolated, mostly male patients–73 percent men, 39 percent women–multitasked and distracted themselves during the virtual visit by: 

Surfing web, checking email, texting – 24.5%
Watching the news, TV, or movie – 24%
Scrolling through social media – 21%
Eating a snack or a meal – 21%
Playing a video game – 19%
Exercising – 18%
Smoking a cigarette – 11%
Driving a car – 10% (!!!!)

And the best….Having a “quarantini” cocktail or other alcoholic beverage – 9.4%

Reasons for consults were unsurprising: annual checkup – 38%, mental health therapy – 25%, and specialist visits (e.g., dermatologist, hematologist, or oncologist) – 21%.  N=1,002 US consumers. 44% of Americans Have Used Telehealth Services During Coronavirus Pandemic but Some Admit Not Paying Attention. Also Advisory Board blog.

News and deal roundup: Signify Health’s $564M IPO, RapidSOS’ $85M Series C, Poland’s Telemedico raise, Livongo’s Zane Burke to Bardavon

The Big Deal of the Week is Signify Health‘s IPO which on 11 February raised $564 million on a sale of 23.5 million shares on the NYSE. Signify provides comprehensive care and management services such as complex care management, SDOH, episodes of care/bundled care programs, and specialized medical services in the home, utilizing technology and data analytics. Signify now has a market capitalization of $7.12 bn. FierceHealthcare, MarketWatch, Signify release.

RapidSOS, an emergency response data platform that provides Next Generation 911 and Emergency Services Network services to Emergency Communication Centers, had a Series C raise of $85 million led by Insight Partners and Global Venture Capital. The RapidSOS technology in global use links 350 million connected devices to first responders and 4,800 data centers. They have raised $205.7 million over 14 rounds since 2016. Crunchbase, release

On the other side of the deal continuum, Poland’s Telemedico, a telemedicine provider in multiple European and Middle Eastern countries, raised a modest €5.5 million (~$6.6 million) in a Series A round. The round is led by Flashpoint Venture Capital, Uniqa Ventures, PKO VC, Black Pearls VC, and Adamed. Mobihealthnews, TechCrunch

And in a coda to the Telavongo story (Teladoc and Livongo), former CEO Zane Burke joined as a director of workers compensation digital health company Bardavon Health Innovations. Mr. Burke led the $18.5 billion merger with Teladoc in his two years as CEO, after 20 years at Cerner. Becker’s Health IT, release (DigitalJournal)

Funding news roundup: Philips buys Capsule, Hims’ SPAC + Privia partnership, Signify Health’s $100M IPO; closed funding for K Health, Aledade, Conversa Health

Royal Philips buys Capsule Technologies for $635 million, extending their integrated solutions platforms for patient care management. Capsule is a developer of medical device integration and data technologies, including vital signs monitoring and clinical surveillance services, for hospitals and healthcare organizations. These technologies connect medical devices and EMRs in hospitals through a vendor-neutral system. The deal will close in this quarter and Capsule’s approximately 300 employees will join Philips’ connected care segment. MassDevice, Philips release.

It’s all about the integration: Hims & Hers $1.6 bn SPAC completes, partners with Privia Health for telehealth and in-person visits. Now that Hims & Hers is now on the NYSE (courtesy of a ‘blank check’ with a division of Oaktree Capital Management) and valued at $1.6 billion, it continues its elevation out of e-commerce home delivery of erectile dysfunction and hair restoration meds to telehealth and in-person medicine. Starting about 18 months ago with virtual visits for minor maladies and mental health, Hims recently went beyond its homegrown capabilities with major providers such as New Orleans-based Ochsner Health System and New York City-based Mount Sinai Health System. Privia is a physician organization consisting of regional groups, ACOs, and specialty verticals in value-based care. Their addition to Hims will be for in-person and telehealth visits in the District of Columbia, Georgia, Maryland, Texas, and Virginia. In past months, it has been eagerly partnering with technology and analytics suppliers to build its management services portfolio. Another sign of more integration: Hims is also moving into pharmacy fulfillment after using outside suppliers. Hasn’t turned the profit corner yet, though. FierceHealthcare, Mobihealthnews

Signify Health signals an IPO. Going the more traditional route is Signify Health, which filed an S-1 registration statement with the SEC for a $100 million offering on the NYSE in the near future. Signify’s analytics and technology platform delivers through its mobile provider networks in-home health and care management services supporting major payers and value-based payment programs. Signify merged in 2019 with fellow, smaller New Mountain Capital company, the former Remedy Health, which specializes in managing providers through episodes of care/bundled payments under the CMS BPCI-A and commercial programs. It is not confirmed if New Mountain, a private equity company based in New York, will be exiting with the IPO. Signify Health release, FierceHealthcare.

Closing funding rounds:

Telehealth/AI platform K Health closed a $132M Series E round of funding led by GGV Capital and Valor Equity Partners, for a total since its 2016 start of $271 million. It also launched a pediatric version of the app, K for Parents. The app connects with doctors in 49 states but also uses health data, curated by AI, to provide patients with guidance for primary care, anxiety, and depression conditions. Release

Even non-telehealth or app-based healthcare companies are taking advantage of funding bounties. Aledade, a management services organization (MSO) for primary care practices, closed a $100 million Series D led by Meritech Capital Partners. Aledade partners with independent practices to organize ACOs in value-based care models. To date, Aledade has raised $249 million. Aledade release.

More modestly, Conversa Health closed its Series B at $20 million, up from $12 million. The round was led by Builders VC and Northwell Ventures. Conversa’s automated virtual care and triage platform remotely monitors, analyzes, and communicates with patients. During COVID, they developed COVID-19 Virtual Care Solutions, a mobile platform for hospitals to increase capacity by automating the outreach to and monitoring of vulnerable patient and employee populations. Release