Oracle’s Big Vision will be missing a lot of people; layoffs hit Cerner, customer experience, marketing staff

‘Healthcare Transformation’ will ring hollow for the many employees at Oracle and Cerner who will be getting 60-day notices — or less — to depart.

One group is within Oracle in the US customer experience division and marketing, and apparently more. According to Bloomberg, the customer experience area that provides analytics and advertising services had been lagging for some time and has been reorganized, losing in the process junior sales employees, a division sales director, and marketing positions. Numbers are not provided, nor information on severance. Also Becker’s.

On the Oracle thread on TheLayoff.com, Oracle Cloud Infrastructure (OCI) North America has been substantially downsized effective 15 August, especially those supporting a Startups product. 

More extensive are the Cerner cuts. This Editor has been following postings as they happen on both the Reddit r/cernercorporation and TheLayoff threads (Oracle thread here). Areas mentioned appear to be primarily internal/non-customer facing: technical project management in population health, enterprise change management, enterprise process improvement, multiple VPs, sales engineers, application services/support, marketing (of course), talent acquisition, and other areas. People ranged from new hires who had offers pulled, to those under one year, to highly experienced employees with a decade or two in the company. UK tech site The Register has an estimate from one posting of 10,000 layoffs. Given that Cerner has about 20,000 employees, that is close to 50%.

As is typical of mass layoffs, those at Cerner reported that they were notified en masse by managers on Monday through snap meetings. Their packages were cleverly designed to skate through the 60-day WARN notice to the state in the US, providing for an end date in 60 days, just before the official cutover to Oracle on 1 October. Severance packages without insurance or benefits after the 60 days were two weeks for every year at Cerner, not particularly generous given the uncertain economy and freezes all over tech. If the individual sought and was offered a position at Oracle, the severance package would be pulled, which is the usual maneuver to discourage any internal job-seeking from this group.

There is no indication of any cuts to Cerner outside the US, yet. The Independent, citing The Information, indicated that further Oracle cuts may come from Canada, India, and Europe. Oracle has a goal of saving $1 billion.

In this Editor’s view, Oracle is erasing Cerner as fast as it can [TTA 19 July] and doing internal housecleaning (bloodletting) at the same time. As to the former, Mike Sicilia’s testimony to the Senate committee about Cerner at the VA [TTA 28 July] had a distinct tone of cleaning up the previous regime’s mess–this should be no surprise. Yet Cerner’s tippy-top management remains in place, with generous compensation and separation arrangements in place [TTA 19 July with links to prior articles]. Cerner’s healthcare customers should take note, either way.

Having been there and done that more than once, our best wishes to everyone affected. Remember that you are not your job, pack up your learnings in your kit bag for a new journey, and you will land a good job soon.

Hat tip to HISTalk as well for covering this story and reaching many on the provider and partner side in the industry that we do not.

The Theranos Story, ch. 32: 155 employees out in latest layoffs, 220 left to go

[grow_thumb image=”https://telecareaware.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/Yak_52__G-CBSS_FLAT_SPIN.jpg” thumb_width=”150″ /]Endlessly, flatly spinning, towards Ground Zero…. As a marketing person made redundant (US=laid off) for various reasons by companies (moving out of area, acquisition, dissolution, etc.), this Editor has zero joy in reporting that 155 Theranos employees will be discharged as it “re-engineers its operations” “towards commercialization of the miniLab testing platform and its related technologies” “aligned to meet product development, regulatory and commercial milestones.” Their Friday press release successfully buried itself on a weekend, aided by a tragic Heaping Helping of Bad News out of Fort Lauderdale. The rationale is that this is justified to better position itself to commercialize the miniLab and “related technologies”. The miniLab reportedly is a compact, microwave-sized lab that automates small volume samples by sending them for analysis to a central server which would do the full analysis, thus driving down cost and time.

Theranos is a company flailing. This Editor notes in its string of releases an endless emphasis on compliance, regulation and operational expertise, the kind of attitude and caution that should have been present years ago. The layoffs follow on last October’s involuntary exits of 340 employees and lab closings (Chapter 21). Run the numbers and there are 220 employees left to go. Will the miniLab, seemingly hastily concocted, be their salvation? Flip back to our Chapter 18 about the October AACC meeting.  Chemical laboratory professionals were distinctly underwhelmed by the miniLab and CEO Elizabeth Holmes’ presentation. Also not boding well was Theranos’ withdrawal of a miniLab Zika test FDA emergency clearance in late August, at the height of the crisis. What may be wafting is the aroma of performing seals on a hot day.

Speaking of leadership, is Ms Holmes among the fired or demoted? Highly unlikely as she controls all $9 of the company’s formerly $9 bn Unicorn Worth. Is she even taking a pay cut? Will you see her out in front of Palo Alto HQ mowing the long grass?

To nearly 500 people now wondering about their livelihood in one of the most expensive areas of the US, how damaged they will be by their association with Theranos? Despite the ‘fail fast’ mantra of Silicon Valley, there’s little tolerance by employers for those at the operational level having a failed company in their past. These people should have our empathy, not ‘guilt by association’, and as appropriate, respect for their skills which were badly used in their last situation.

One also wonders how long it will take before there is another Chapter in The Theranos Story, one that they will file via one of their multitudinous law firms–Chapter 11. Consumerist (Consumer Reports), Yahoo News.

See here for the 31 previous TTA chapters in this Continuing, Consistently Amazing Saga, including the resignation of General Mattis from the BOD (Ch. 31), Theranos’ annus horribilis (Ch. 30) and the law firm feeding frenzy (Ch. 29).