TTA’s Week: Analyzing DNA for pre-diabetics’ food shopping, Zimmer/Apple Watch trial, UK’s IoT Code of Practice, digital news from all over, more!

 

DNA analysis goes food shopping to prevent Type 2 diabetes in the prone. Zimmer uses Apple Watch to monitor hip/knee replacement patients. A Code of Practice for IoT in UK. Plus NYeC’s Gala Awards, MedStartr’s latest challenge at AMIA, and our international company news roundup.

DNA-based personalized food choices to prevent Type 2 diabetes onset in test with Imperial College, London and Waitrose (UK) (Combining DNA testing with food shopping)
Apple Watch, Zimmer Biomet in clinical trial for monitoring hip and knee replacements (Potentially huge impact on outcomes)
News roundup: Partners HealthCare Pivot Labs, TytoCare’s CE Mark, ISfTeH’s 2019 conference calls for presentations, three Smart Ageing Prizes awarded (From Bilbao to Boston)
MedStartr Challenge at the AMIA Annual Symposium 5 November (Pick your companies!)
NYeC’s 2018 Gala & Awards on 27 November (US) (Mix with the top folk in NY healthcare)
UK sets forth a Code of Practice for secure IoT for connected devices and smart homes (Sound guidelines, but enforcement?)

Digital health funding finally soars to the moon–in the home. BlackBerry is alive and Sparking, Withings is back. E-triggers to detect misdiagnosis. And are you going to Connected Health in Boston?

$6.8 bn in digital health funding through Q3 blows the doors off 2017: Rock Health (And the vote’s for in-home health)
It’s Alive! BlackBerry still Sparking with an ‘ultra-secure hyperconnectivity’ healthcare platform (Plugging the gap in EoT)
Diagnostic ‘e-triggers’ in EHRs to detect misdiagnosis, identify high-risk patients over time (Mining that data with machine learning and AI)
Withings returns to international markets with Steel HR Sport and a new Go (From Finland to France, and back to design heritage)
A preview of this week’s Connected Health Conference in Boston (Three days of immersion at the Seaport)

Lessons from Theranos for Silicon Valley? Are the new Apple Watch health features a mismatch to their market? Whither GEHC’s future within the Death Star? Will healthcare AI hype melt from a dash of cold water? Accreditation increasing provider burden?

The Theranos Story, ch. 57: was it Silicon Valley and Startup Culture bad practices pushed to the max? (The ‘hit to hope’ has two meanings)
Accrediting telehealth and remote patient monitoring providers (US) (Another try that may work this time, but increasing the training burden)
The Apple Watch, ECG and fall detection–a trend too far? (A market disconnect between those who buy and who actually need)
CEO change at GE may mean delay or cancellation of GE Healthcare spinoff–for good or ill (Time to destroy the Death Star?)
A sobering, mercifully hype-free view of AI in healthcare (A needed cold water bath)

Vital signs monitoring that reads people through walls and could revolutionize RPM.

No more smartwatches or connected tablets? Reading human vital signs through walls via a reverse Wi-Fi box and machine learning (A future without PERS, tablets, watches….)

Breaking news about 3rings and Canary Care. Babylon Health has no problem with funding–and spending. Cigna-Express Scripts clears DOJ. Two warnings about code running amuck if we don’t chill. More on Best Buy’s Assured Living. And more!

3rings assistive tech will be ringing off next March (UK) (Breaking news on yet another sad health tech closure)
Canary Care goes into administration, is acquired by Lifecycle Software (UK) (Breaking, but perhaps some hope)
AI promises, promises! Babylon Health to spend $100m, hire 1,000 to develop leading AI platform (Attracting funding like a magnet)
Cigna’s $69 million acquisition of Express Scripts clears US Department of Justice hurdle (But 50 hurdles lie ahead)
Weekend reading: the deadly consequences of unpredictable code (don’t be in a bike in front of a self-driving car)
IoT=Cyberdisaster, if we don’t chill innovation and secure it. It’s hip to be scared! (An argument for rational regulation)
Best Buy update: ‘Assured Living’ assuredly up and running. And was this Editor’s in-store experience not typical? (Should have the Geeks to the house for the TV)

It’s a busy start to September, including Apple and M&A Action, AliveCor’s FDA breakthrough, plus Tunstall’s Danish snack. Some thoughts on Best Buy and how not to serve the older adult market. Aging2.0 invites you to pitch. VistA EHR’s international future. And more!

Rounding up September’s start: AliveCor’s hyperkalemia detector, Apple’s ECG Watch, Tunstall Nordic’s EWII, steps towards a bionic eye, Philips licenses BATDOK, VistA’s international future
Apply to pitch your older adult health solution at the SOMPO Digital Lab Pitch Event (At Aging2.0’s OPTIMIZE)
Can Best Buy have an effective older adult strategy when they can’t sell a TV? (One Editor’s predictive visit)
CVS-Aetna, Cigna-Express Scripts reportedly on road to merger approval; Athenahealth in hostile takeover (M&A heats up, not always for the better)

Theranos runs out of cash and dissolves, but the litigation lingers on. Two more events for your fall calendar.

The Theranos Story, ch. 56: Bye, bye Theranos…but the litigation continues (Fortress collects the remains. Holmes and Balwani face the hard, cold DOJ with no company behind them)
Two more events for the calendar: ATA’s EDGE18 (Austin TX), SEHTA/Brunel MedTech Connects (London) (Is your calendar filled yet?)

Facing September–and facing that we need to protect personal genomic data. What’s the difference between being embarrassed and indicted? (Mortal risk to patients?) Blending direct and telehealth for mental care. The US Army’s telehealth innovations in medical triage. Social determinants of health applied right can save acute care money. Why telehealth needs compliance folks. And you’ll ‘fall’ for our extended listing of international events.

Soapbox: Big Genomics and DNA testing–why we need a Genomic Data Bill of Rights

The Theranos Story, ch. 55: ‘Bad Blood’s’ altered reality on ‘Mad Money’; it was all Bad Blitzscaling (Fascinating Fraudsters Meet Mortal Risk )
Rounding up August’s end: ‘blended’ mental healthcare, Army’s telehealth innovation, Montefiore’s 300% ROI on social determinants, telehealth needs compliance (More short takes on articles in the hopper)
More events for your autumnal calendar, from Israel to Ireland to Santa Clara to NYC! (updated) (And there’s a Mediterranean Ventures winner!)

 


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NYeC’s 2018 Gala & Awards on 27 November (US)

The influential New York eHealth Collaborative (NYeC) is honoring four highly influential leaders in improving healthcare through the use of technology on Tuesday 27 November in NYC: Michael Dowling, CEO of Northwell Health; Linda A. Lambert, CAE, Executive Director of the New York State Chapter of the American College of Physicians; and CEO/founders Ido and Roy Schoenberg, MD of American Well.

The gala will be at the Edison Ballroom, which this Editor can confirm was a top-notch venue last year. More information and registration is here.

If you are at all engaged with healthcare systems and technology in the New York metro area, it’s worth your time and fisc to attend this event to be the company of over 250 C-suite executives, leaders, and policymakers.

NYeC is a non-profit which works with the New York State Department of Health to improve healthcare by collaboratively leading, connecting, and integrating health information exchange (HIE) across the state. One of their major tasks is to advance the Statewide Health Information Network for New York (SHIN-NY), a network connecting healthcare professionals statewide. 

EHRs: now safety, info exchange concerns (US, AU, CA)

What’s this? EHRs reducing, not increasing, safety? Reports from both the US and Australia seem to indicate another spanner (US: wrench) in the EHR works, aside from the laggardness in achieving the HITECH Act’s goals [TTA 27 Mar].

  • The Joint Commission, which is the chief US accreditation and certification body for healthcare organizations and programs, and thus to be taken very VERY seriously, released a Sentinel Event (Patient Safety Event) Alert yesterday. It warned of EHR-related adverse events affecting patient health, resulting from incorrect or miscommunicated information entered into EHRs. Interfaces built into the technology can contribute and studies have documented mixed results in the systems’ ability to detect and prevent errors. It identifies eight key factors,led by human-computer interface, workflow and communication and clinical content, that can lead to a sentinel event and three major remedy actions. While the JC does take pains to confirm the positive effects of well-designed and appropriately used EHRs, with strong clinical processes in place, it is the first ‘red flag’ this Editor can recall (more…)

Patients’ records could be shared between NI and New York for clinical trials!

Patients’ records could be shared between Northern Ireland and New York as part of a proposal to improve healthcare and research. NI Health Minister, Edwin Poots was recently in the US for high-level talks about developing the collaboration with the New York State Health Department. Read more… TANN Ireland

Editor Donna note: Though not stated, this well could take advantage of the expansion of the SHIN-NY health information exchange (HIE) connecting hospitals, medical practices and nursing homes along with medication and management interfaces. See NYeC Digital Health Conference 2013, especially the link to the HITECH Answers article which has more information on SHIN-NY. 

Systems sharing data, still behaving badly

A straight-shooting article in Healthcare Technology Online provides a overview of the EHR and Health Information Exchange (HIE) mess in the US. Essentially our major EHR systems (Cerner, McKesson, athenahealth, Greenway, Epic) don’t interchange data well, if at all–and the 600-odd practice EHRs were built on siloed designs, existing software and used proprietary formats, often in a rush to take advantage of Federal subsidy programs in Stage 1 Meaningful Use–as HTO’s EIC Ken Congdon stated, “electronic filing cabinets”–and heavily outsourced. Well, it’s now ‘uh-oh’ time as a key part of Stage 2 MU is interoperability. Basically we now have a set of what this Editor would term ‘paste ons’ and ‘add-ins’ to facilitate data exchange between systems that speak different languages (Editor’s emphasis):

direct protocol (a standards-based method for allowing participants to send authenticated and secure messages via the National Health Information Network), as well as those developed by HL7 (Health Level Seven), a nonprofit global health IT standards organization, provide EHR users with the building blocks for exchanging data. Blue Button, an application developed by the VA that allows patients to download their own health records, is also being adopted and manipulated by EHR vendors and independent developers as a way for providers to exchange data between systems. Moreover, regional and state-run HIEs offer healthcare providers in several parts of the country a network they can join (and technology infrastructure they can leverage) to share health data with other HIE members.

Some systems work well–EHR and pharmacy systems seem to. However, EHR to EHR interfaces are up to the provider and are expensive. Sharing/translation does not mean that all information makes it over without getting ‘bruised’ or having to be reentered manually.  HIEs, acting as a focal point for data exchange, are also generally non-profit; the exchange platforms cost millions to develop and further millions to maintain–and buy-in is low, as the article states. Fixing The EHR Interoperability Mess (free registration may be required)

(Updated 8/7 pm for Editor Donna’s POV) This is what happens when you rush adoption and development processes that should take years in order to gain quick subsidy money, and non-healthcare entities (that is you, the US Government) encouraged this, distorting the process. The private and public waste of scarce healthcare funds is appalling, and the disruption to the healthcare system is unforgivable–especially in practices where doctors and managers in many cases have been sold a bill of goods, and they are revolting by changing EHRs, going back to paper or retiring. And the Government should look to itself first. Look no further than to the multiple failures of two branches of the US government, Veterans Affairs and Department of Defense, which have the responsibility for current and veteran members of our Armed Services. They have failed spectacularly in serving Those Who Have Served not only the integration of their two EHRs but also in updating their basic architecture [TTA 27 July ‘Pondering the Squandering’… and 3 Apr ‘Behind the Magic 8 Ball’ both review the sad details.] The belief that HIEs with limited funding will solve the interoperability problem is Magic Thinking. At least one move in this direction makes sense: the CommonWell Alliance of six EHR heavy hitters to work on ‘data liquidity’ [TTA 5 Mar announced at HIMSS], but this may be another ‘uh-oh’ and face saving.

With basic, necessary health and patient information stuck in systems and getting lost in translation, how can anyone rationally expect that personal data from telehealth devices will be integrated anytime soon, in any meaningful way? Does this mean that parallel, separate systems and platforms will continue to develop–and yet another wave of integration?