‘Protecting Patient Information’–a ‘worst case scenario’ book for HIT

A much-needed book in the age of Hacker/RansomwareMania. A new book published, ‘Protecting Patient Information’ by Paul Cerrato, is subtitled ‘A Decision-Maker’s Guide to Risk, Prevention, and Damage Control.” It’s not a tome at 162 pages, since it’s written not for academics or IT Gearheads, but for physicians (including doctors running small practices), nurses, healthcare executives and business associates. It takes a practical, three-part approach to IT security in healthcare organizations which can be applied internationally:

  1. How to do an in-depth analysis of the organization’s risk level
  2. How to lower the risk of a data breach within the myriad of Federal and state rules regarding protected PHI
  3. How to deal with a data breach, even if you’ve followed 1) and 2) (This may be the ‘worst case scenario’ part of the book)

The preface to the book is written by John Halamka, MD, himself a CIO of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston and a professor at Harvard Medical School. It will set you back about $42, but worth it. Hat tip to our friends at HITECH Answers via Twitter. If you’ve read the book or will read it soon, this Editor and your fellow Readers would be interested in your thoughts or even a review.

Accenture projects that 50 percent of digital health startups fail after two years

[grow_thumb image=”https://telecareaware.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/Accenture-zombie_webready.jpg” thumb_width=”175″ /]Based on historical funding data and analyzing 900 healthcare IT start-ups, Accenture predicts that within two years of life, 50 percent will fail. These ‘zombie startups’, in Accenture’s charming term, burned through $4 bn in funding between 2008 and 2013. An additional $2.5 bn will go to fund digital health in 2015-16.

Does this mean that for the angels to the VCs, a visit to Las Vegas may be more fun? What remains can be mined for gold. There’s a wealth of IP–1,700 patents between the 900 startups analyzed–and experienced people who can be “aqui-hired”. Their solutions, despite failure, can be sound. Kaveh Safavi, managing director of Accenture’s global health care business, said, “Many digital startups that are dying or in danger of failure have developed solutions that can help traditional and non-traditional health care companies achieve their goals.” Mobihealthnews, iHealthBeat, FierceHealthIT. Accenture announcement.

HC2014

19-20 March 2014, Manchester Central, Petersfield, UK

For over 30 years, HC has delivered thought leadership; informing and educating its audience on the how the latest innovations in technology support the increasing demands within healthcare. HC2014 will address all the current healthcare reforms with a number of themes referring to the call for paperless NHS by 2018. Key sessions will demonstrate technology to support Patient Engagement, Safer Hospitals and Integrated Care. Conference and exhibition presented by the BCS, The Chartered Institute for IT, in partnership with HIMSS. Conference keynoters include Tim Kelsey, NHS England; Andrea Sutcliffe, Care Quality Commission; Mike Pringle, Royal College of GPs; Kingsley Manning, HSCIC. Information and registration. Hat tip to reader Louise Sinclair. If there are TTA readers planning to attend, we are once again inviting you to contribute an article or a compilation of impressions. This can be filed within 72 hours of the close of event; alternatively, during or at day’s end/start. If you are interested, please email EIC Donna here (donna.cusano@telecareaware.com). It is expected that you can be selective and interesting rather than comprehensive. You will be credited of course but expenses and article will not be covered.