The implications of Teladoc’s integration into Microsoft Teams

The Big News this week was the terse announcement by Microsoft and Teladoc that Teladoc’s Solo application for hospitals and health systems will be integrated into Microsoft Teams applications. The integration includes workflows and through Solo, integration into EHRs while remaining in Teams.

During the pandemic, many health systems resorted to Microsoft Teams to communicate internally and one-on-one with patients. Integration means that while on the Teams consult, a clinician can securely access clinical data included within the EHR and workflows via Teladoc Health Solo without leaving it. It can also connect care teams on the consult. The release also mentions the magic words artificial intelligence and machine learning, without giving examples. 

As of now, with telehealth receding to perhaps 5% of visits based on claims [TTA 9 July], it’s a strategic win for Teladoc to integrate with a part of the Microsoft suite widely used by providers. It also builds on an existing relationship between the companies, as Teladoc already uses Azure as one of its cloud providers. Health systems still have to license Teladoc Solo if they do not already, and engineering work is yet to be done. Teladoc has a substantial foothold in this market due to its July 2020 acquisition of InTouch Health. InTouch’s hospital-to-home telehealth is now Teladoc Solo, with a separate line of business into the specialty telehealth consult market through its portable wheeled telehealth carts for in-hospital use. It’s notable that the InTouch brand remains, albeit visibly transitioning to Teladoc.

According to Credit Suisse’s analysis (page 3), 46% of C-Level executives from hospitals and health systems (combined representing 563 hospitals) said that they currently work with Microsoft Teams as a telemedicine vendor. 11% said they already work with Teladoc/InTouch Health.

As for telehealth already used by providers, such as Zipnosis’ ‘white label’ triage/telehealth system (now owned by insurtech Bright Health) and Bluestream Health, can they compete? Also FierceHealthcare

News and deals roundup: CoverMyMeds ‘big bang’, Noom’s $540M Series F, insurtech Bright Health’s IPO, Grand Rounds-Included Health, GoodRx, Cedar-OODA, Huma, Bluestream Health’s outreach

McKesson shmushes four units into CoverMyMeds. McKesson’s Big Bang combines four McKesson business units–RelayHealth (pharmacy networking), McKesson Prescription Automation (software), CoverMyMeds (medication access for patients), and RxCrossroads by McKesson (therapeutic and drug commercialization). They are being reassembled into one massive unit under the CoverMyMeds name. The unit will have about 5,000 people and will be headed by Nathan Mott. More here in a blog post/announcement posting that’s short on information and long on cheerleading.

And the funding rounds keep marching down the alphabet. Noom, the weight loss app, gained a generous Series F of $540 million led by Silver Lake with participation from Oak HC/FT, Temasek (Singapore), Novo Holdings, Sequoia Capital, RRE and Samsung Ventures. Valuation is now at $4 billion. Adam Karol, a managing director at Silver Lake, and former TaskRabbit chief executive Stacy Brown-Philpot will join Noom’s board. The fresh funding will be used to expand into areas such as stress and anxiety, diabetes, hypertension, and sleep.

Noom had a banner year in 2020, with $400 million in revenues as people tried to shed Pandemic Pounds (aided by a near-ubiquitous ad push). The app has had 45 million downloads to date in 100 countries, largely in the US, UK, Canada, Australia, Ireland, and New Zealand. According to a (paywalled) Bloomberg News report, feelers are out for an IPO which may be valued at $10 billion. TechCrunch, Reuters, FierceHealthcare

Bright Health Group filed its S-1 registration statement with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). Their rumored $1 billion IPO will be on the NYSE and trade under the symbol BHG. Timing, share value, and number of shares are to be determined. It’s speculated that the valuation at that point is expected to be between $10 and $20 billion. Bright Health is an insurtech operating exchange and Medicare Advantage (MA) health plans under Bright HealthCare  in 14 states and 50 markets, covering over 620,000 lives. They also have a separate care delivery channel called NeueHealth, 61 advanced risk-bearing primary care clinics delivering in-person and virtual care to 75,000 unique patients. Last month, they purchased Zipnosis, adding their white-labeled telemedicine for large health systems business. Bright Health Group release, Mobihealthnews

Short takes:

Doctor on Demand and Grand Rounds, which finalized their merger earlier this month, have agreed to acquire Included Health. Terms and timing were not disclosed. Included Health specializes in care concierge and healthcare navigation services for the LGBTQ+ community. FierceHealthcare, Release

GoodRx acquired rival RxSaver for $50 million in cash in late April to bulk up against Amazon. FierceHealthcare

Medical billing and pre-visit tech company Cedar is acquiring payer workflow tech company OODA Health for $425 million deal in a mix of cash and equity. It’s expected to close at end of May. OODA’s co-founder, chairman, and co-CEO is Giovanni Colella, MD, also co-founded Castlight Health and founded RelayHealth (see above), so another successful exit for him. FierceHealthcare, HISTalk

London-based Huma, raised $130 million in a Series C. Leaps by Bayer and Hitachi Ventures led the round. The former, mysterious Medopad now seems to have settled on a platform that supports ‘hospital at home’ plus pharma and research companies in large, decentralized clinical trials. There’s an add-on of $70 million to the Series C that can be exercised at a later date. Release, HISTalk

White-label telehealth provider Bluestream Health is partnering with The Azadi Project to provide virtual care services to refugee women and girls fleeing from countries like AfghanistanIranIraq, and Syria for safety in Greece. “Bluestream Health has teamed with The Azadi Project to provide a virtual care platform that stretches around the world. The women fleeing war-torn and conflict-affected countries have suffered unspeakable abuse, and while seeking safety in Greece, they are further exposed to terrible living conditions and hostility.”  said Matthew Davidge, co-founder and CEO of Bluestream Health.  Release

Two major moves and what they mean: Doctor on Demand, Grand Rounds to merge; Amazon Care will go national by summer (updated)

This week’s Digital Health Big Deal (as of Wednesday!) is the merger agreement between telehealth/virtual visit provider Doctor on Demand and employer health navigator Grand Rounds. Terms were not disclosed. It’s important because it extends Grand Rounds’ care coordination capabilities beyond provider network navigation and employee clinical/financial tools for six million employees into an extensive telehealth network with 98 million patients in commercial, Federal, and state health plans.

Both companies had big recent raises–$175 million for Grand Rounds in a September 2020 Series E (Crunchbase) and Doctor on Demand with a $75 million Series D last July (Crunchbase). The transaction is a stock swap with no cash involved (FierceHealthcare, CNBC), and the announcement states that the two companies will operate under their own brands for the time being. Owen Tripp, co-founder and CEO of Grand Rounds, will run the combined company, while Doctor on Demand CEO Hill Ferguson runs DOD and joins the board. The combined company is well into Double Unicorn status with over $2 bn in valuation. Also Mobihealthnews.

What it means. Smaller (than Teladoc and Amwell) telehealth companies have been running towards M&A, with the most recent MDLive joining Optum’s Evernorth [TTA 27 Feb] creating interstate juggernauts with major leverage. Doctor on Demand was looking at their options for expansion or acquisition and decided 1) the time and the $ were right and 2) with Grand Rounds, they could keep a modicum of independence as a separate line while enjoying integration with a larger company. The trend is profound enough to raise alarms in the august pages of Kaiser Health News, which decries interstate telehealth providers competing with small and often specialized in-state providers, and in general the loosening of telehealth requirements, including some providers still only taking virtual visits. Contra this, but not in the KHN article, this Editor has previously noted that white-labeled telehealth providers such as Zipnosis and Bluestream Health have found a niche in supplying large health systems and provider groups with customized telehealth and triage systems.

UPDATED. In the Shoe Dropping department, Amazon Care goes national with virtual primary care (VPC). To no one’s surprise after Haven’s demise, Amazon’s pilot among their employees providing telehealth plus in-person for those in the Seattle area [TTA 17 Dec 20] is rolling out nationally in stages. First, the website is now live and positions the company as a total care management service for both urgent and primary care. Starting Wednesday, Amazon opened the full service (Video and Mobile Care) to other Washington state companies. The in-person service will expand to Washington, DC, Baltimore, and other cities in the next few months. Video Care will be available nationally to companies and all Amazon employees by the summer.

Notably, and buried way down in the glowing articles, Amazon is not engaging with payers on filing reimbursements for patient care. Video Care and Care Medical services will be billed directly to the individual who must then send for reimbursement to their insurance provider. The convenience is compromised by additional work on the patient’s part, something that those of us on the rare PPO plans were accustomed to doing back in the Paper Age but not common now. It also tends to shut out over 65’s on Medicare and those on low-income plans through Medicaid. It is doubtful that Amazon really wants this group anyway. Not exactly inclusive healthcare.

TechCrunch, FierceHealthcare. Jailendra Singh’s Credit Suisse team has a POV here which opines that Amazon continues to have a weak case for disruption in VPC, along with their other healthcare efforts, and an uphill battle against the current telehealth players who have already allied themselves with employers and integrating with payers.

News roundup: Hacks, ransomware of medical records, security cameras spike; Withings launches new mobile-direct devices; Bluestream Health adds Leon Medical (FL) to telehealth

In recent weeks, hackermania has been romping in healthcare. A compilation of incidents revealed just in the past few weeks have affected hundreds of thousands of patients, employees, and providers:

  • Security cameras produced by Verkada, Inc. were hacked across the US, including at Tesla. Healthcare organizations affected by the hack were Daytona Beach, Fla.-based Halifax Health, where the video showed “what appeared to be eight staffers tackling a man and pinning him to a bed.” Texarkana, Texas-based Wadley Regional Medical Center and Tempe (Ariz.) St. Luke’s Hospital were also hacked. The means in was described by one of the hackers (appropriately female for this month) as through a “super admin” account where the username and password appeared online. Becker’s Health IT 10 March, Bloomberg News
  • 210,000 MultiCare patients, providers, and employees of Tacoma, Wash.-based MultiCare had personal information exposed in a December ransomware attack on their medical practice management company’s IT services vendor. Becker’s Health IT 9 March
  • A clinic in North Carolina had a six-day ransomware attack starting 23 February. Hackers demanded a $1.75 million payment in exchange for giving back the clinic access to its data. The clinic came back online 1 March but did not disclose any payment. Becker’s Health IT 5 March
  • NBC News revealed that hackers stole employee files from Gallup, New Mexico-based Rehoboth McKinley Christian Health Care Services after a ransomware attack on its computer network in February. Those employee files were posted online; information included employee job applications and background check authorizations with Social Security numbers. Earlier attacks by the same hacker group included Leon Medical Centers of Miami-Dade Florida (see following) and Nocona (Texas) General Hospital resulted in the online publishing of tens of thousands of patient records. Becker’s Health IT 4 March
  • Hackers attacked biochemical machines used to prepare samples in Oxford University’s Division of Structural Biology. Forbes received the information from Hold Security chief technology officer Alex Holden, who provided screenshots of the hackers’ access to Oxford University systems, and notified the university.
  • The cutely-named DopplePaymer attacked a county government office in Chatham County, North Carolina, and stole residents’ PHI and PII between November 2020 and this past January. Becker’s 10 Feb 
  • And on the ‘Someone Got Fired For This One’ list is the response to hacking at Boise, Idaho’s Saint Alphonsus Health System. The health system had a data breach in January. Patients were routinely notified. However, the mail merge, not the hack, created an incorrect status for some patients, sending them letters as if they were deceased or a minor. Becker’s Health IT 10 March

It’s cold comfort when the US Department of Justice announces that they are indicting three North Korean hackers who inflicted the WannaCry malware and $1.3 bn in extortion damage on the world back in 2018. All three were members of North Korea’s intelligence agency, the Reconnaissance General Bureau (RGB). The likelihood of their extradition is one word: none.

And in other news….

Withings unveils new professional devices. The Body Pro smart scale and BPM Connect Pro, distributed to doctors, out of the box will transmit health data directly from patient to doctor. Neither require Wi-Fi nor a mobile phone, since they have embedded SIM cellular cards to directly connect to a mobile network. They are both sold through Withings’ professional division. FierceHealthcare

Telehealth provider Bluestream Health has added Leon Medical Centers, a seven-location Miami-Dade FL provider. Bluestream Health provides whitelabeled secure telehealth services that combine with medical workflows to approximately 50,000 providers in 500 facilities. Release.

Bluestream Health telehealth partners with Impresiv Health management consultants

Bluestream Health, which we noted back in November as partnering with LanguageLine to add language interpretation to their telehealth platform, has a new partnership with the interestingly named Impresiv Health. Impresiv is a national healthcare management consulting firm concentrating in clinical, operations management, and software consulting for payers and accountable care organizations (ACOs). They also provide permanent and interim staffing in multiple healthcare areas. Adding virtual care now allows Impresiv to deliver telehealth services as part of their management services menu. Bluestream Health is a secure telehealth platform which provides whitelabeled telehealth services to approximately 50,000 providers. Release   Hat tip to Erin Farrell-Talbot

Short Takes 20 Nov: Doro Eliza social alarm in UK, R2G diabetes market study, KOMPAÏ Robotics update, Bluestream Health integrates LanguageLine translation, and Optum’s 18

Why does this whole year feel like we are Pauline in Peril, all tied-up, with an Evil Man menacing us while the Train barrels down the tracks? Nonetheless, there are bites of news to be consumed, even though this year’s Thanksgiving in the US will be at best a muted one, and the Grinch may be stealing Christmas.

Doro remains ‘on a tear’ with new product introductions for the UK. The Doro Eliza (right) is a 4G/digital IP compatible social alarm/”smartcare” hub, with a modern design that connects to telecare accessories. The modern design has HD audio on the speaker for personal alarms, and also connects to smoke detectors, fall sensors, security cameras, and pill dispensers. Already introduced in Europe, its timing is part of the transition from analogue to digital telecare for 1.7 million UK telecare users as telecom moves to full digital by 2025. Release.

If your business is in diabetes care and the apps that assist them, Research2Guidance’s study and forecast, “The Global Digital Diabetes Care Market 2020: Going Beyond Diabetes Management” will be of interest. The 91-page report covers a global picture of growth from 2008 projecting out to 2024, as well as digital solutions, their segmentation, and competition. For instance, from 2019 to 2024, the number of diagnosed diabetics with access to smart devices is set to increase from 109 million to 180 million. It includes profiles of 10 countries. Priced from €3,290, so it will set you back a bit. More information here

We missed updating you on KOMPAÏ Robotics, which Editor Emeritus Steve Hards first covered in 2011. Their latest developments were earlier this year as their assistance/companion robot finally debuted for sale–right in the middle of the pandemic. This Pulse article recounts the road for CEO Vincent Dupourqué from 1975 to the third version of KOMPAÏ.

LanguageLine, which is a long-time provider of language translation services live to in-patient and acute care settings, announced an integration with Bluestream Health’s virtual visits. With a single click, a Bluestream user can access audio and video interpretation in 240 languages and over 13,000 interpreters. LanguageLine also assists with deaf and hard-of-hearing users. Bluestream provides whitelabeled telehealth services to approximately 50,000 providers. LanguageLine has headquarters in California, with offices in Taiwan and London.  Release

And finally, Optum’s 18. Optum Ventures, the funding arm of UnitedHealth Group’s Optum, has invested in a large number of healthcare ventures this year, nearly all with a health tech or AI spin. It’s neatly distributed internationally and between Series A through C, with UK companies like Oxford VR (VR used for therapies, no connection to Oxford Medical Simulations) as part of a $12.5 million Series A, Germany’s Kaia Health with a $26 million Series B tranche, and US companies like LetsGetChecked as part of a $71 million Series C. Not quite Ocean’s 11, but Optum’s bet a lot more than Danny Ocean got from those casinos in 1960. Becker’s Health IT.