Facebook Meta Pixel update: Nemours Children’s Health using 25 ad trackers on appointment scheduling site

The Meta Pixel tracker study gets a little worse–this time, it’s information on appointments for children. The Markup’s investigation on healthcare use of ad trackers continues with an examination of Nemours Children’s Health, a Delaware-based multi-state health network with 97 locations in Delaware, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Florida that serve about 500,000 families. Once again, Meta Pixel and other ad trackers were found to capture personal information and patient/family details entered by an adult on the appointment scheduling site to Facebook that may constitute protected health information.

Meta Pixel was recorded as tracking:

  • IP addresses
  • Scheduled doctor and his or her specialty
  • In some cases, the first and last name of the child being scheduled

It is not this information alone, but in combination with other information that Facebook possesses, that can profile any user’s health conditions, link specific conditions to individuals and parents, and thus constitute a privacy violation. IP addresses are one of the factors that HIPAA cites as when linked to other information, create a violation.

The Markup used a tool called Blacklight to scan Nemours’ websites.

What was Nemours thinking in building their website? In addition to Meta Pixel, the scheduling site is riddled with 25 ad trackers and 38 third-party cookies. These are coded in by Facebook, Amazon, Google, and The Latest Healthcare Transformer, Oracle. Oracle claims it has healthcare data on 80% of US internet users, and one can assume this is how they get it. Ad platforms MediaMath and LiveRamp also captured data. The Markup’s team could detect the trackers, but not determine what information these ad trackers were capturing. 

In addition to the trackers on the scheduling site, Blacklight picked up a session recorder from Mouseflow. This is code that can potentially track what people click on a page. Mouseflow states on its Legal Hub that in order to transmit HIPAA-protected information to a third party, a business associate agreement (BAA) must be in place. Mouseflow did not confirm a BAA agreement to The Markup, but in a statement to them insisted that Mouseflow does not permit the transmission of PII or PHI and masks that information.

Not all health data transmitted constitute HIPAA violations, but capture of appointment scheduling information is right on the line of HIPAA violations, though not 100% conclusive.

Elsewhere on the Nemours website, there were nine ad trackers and ten third-party cookies. 

Even after they were notified by The Markup, Nemours persisted in using Meta Pixel. While many of the trackers on the scheduling site were removed, trackers from Facebook, Google, and Salesforce remained. Facebook’s Meta Pixel was removed after last week’s story.

This is certainly another gap between the suits in the suites and the IT/developers rowing in the galley.

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