Search Results for ehr implementation

Will Yorkshire CCGs pull the plug on the NYY telehealth project? (UK)

It seems but yesterday that Telecare Aware readers were flagging up that the £3.2 million procurement by NHS North Yorkshire and York PCT (NYY) of Tunstall telehealth monitoring equipment (including ‘free’ implementation consultancy services but plus ongoing costs of £1.7m per year) looked too hasty, too large and too soon. But no, it is over two years since NYY PCT responds to Telecare Aware item: The £3+ million telehealth spend that has achieved…what? was published. So it gives editor Steve no pleasure at all to point you to the following article that appeared in the Yorkshire Post today: Telehealth revolution... Continue Reading

EHR misery continues

EHRs are rapidly becoming the Rodney Dangerfield of eHealth (‘I don’t get no respect’). No surprise to any doctor or clinical staff who uses them–but the realization has dawned that it has actually made charts more labor intensive. “I think we’ve sort of made the paper chart electronic, but what we’ve done almost nothing of is automation.” has to be one of the drollest quotes of the past few years (Dr. Donald Rucker, VP and chief medical officer of Siemens Healthcare USA). Instead of using computers to automate, EHRs make records even ‘stickier’. Hospitals like it because it helps capture... Continue Reading

Why Athenahealth bought Epocrates

...this HIStalk Connect article [WARNING 31 Aug 2014: linked page may now be infected with malware] to our earlier one [TA 8 Jan] but it’s an extremely thorough external analysis of why Epocrates‘ core product–a mobile drug reference–would be worth nearly $300 million (a 22% premium to share value) to Athenahealth. While most have pointed out the mHealth aspects in improving the latter’s mobile offerings, the real reason, according to writer Travis Good, MD, is for Athenahealth to gain exposure to a hard-to-reach group via Epocrates’ ubiquity, and gain more physician users of its core services, practice management and EHR.... Continue Reading

Further sad confirmation of CTE

...readers: Do you believe that sensors in helmets and EHRs can mitigate this, which is where the NFL (and Army-NFL) funding is directed? Is this being found in other countries in contact sports such as rugby? Is there evidence, in other countries’ armed forces which have participated in Iraq and Afghanistan action, of suspected high frequencies of brain trauma? Related: National Football League Readies New EHR System To Boost Care Quality for Players (includes Olympics and NBA) (iHealthBeat audio interview 06:13 and PDF transcript) NEW: CTE, as cumulative, starts early Institute of Medicine Studying Concussions in Young Athletes (NY Times)... Continue Reading

Consolidation strikes: the Athenahealth-Epocrates acquisition

The much-rumored acquisition of major medical point-of-care reference database Epocrates by practice management/EHR leader Athenahealth has many good points for the latter, including the integration of drug interaction alerts into EHRs. Epocrates’ stumbles into mobile EHRs may also have, paradoxically, made it more attractive. But even with this, financial observers see Athenahealth as essentially sideways in terms of growth. But it may point to the major trends of 2013 your Editors have seen for awhile: a push for integration into easier-to-by ‘all in one’ packages; consolidation in order to stay in place in a muddling market. 4 observations about the... Continue Reading

Brace yourself: worldwide telehealth to grow by 55% in 2013

InMedica, the health tech research analytics arm of UK-based IMS Research, released in December this startling growth number for telehealth–55% vs. 2012–applying to both device and service revenue for 2013. Startling because 2012/2011 growth in revenue was only 18% and 2011/2010 growth was a paltry 5%, even as patients grew by 22%. InMedica cites the uncertain economic situation in Europe and ‘ambiguity on the impact of healthcare reform’ in the US as dampening growth. In 2013, InMedica sees growth drivers in the US as the implementation of CMS 30-day re-admissions penalties and the influence of new care models for hospital... Continue Reading

The last weekend update for 2012

Where did it go? Some short cuts and loose ends tied up from a very fast year… LifeNexus scores $2.2 million for credit card-type PHR from 16 investors. The proprietary software/card reader/provider terminal system can handle up to six persons per card and also can double as a prepaid card. According to reports, 4,000 cards are already in use in Washington state. Pluses: convenience, privacy and security. Minuses: potential loss, closed system and EHR interoperability. MedCityNews We haven’t heard from the LifeBot emergency telemedicine system in a long time–early 2011. Their news is that they have finally untethered their units... Continue Reading

High-tech aging: improving lives today (video)

Just released by LeadingAge CAST (Center for Aging Services Technologies) is a ‘vision video’ that demonstrates how various technologies interact in the life and medical situation of one 83 year old woman. What is more, every bit of health tech in the story is available right now. Sharp-eyed viewers will see Care Innovations’ QuietCare and Philips LifeLine (but not the Auto-Alert) but the telehealth hub and the EHR are not identified. (List your guesses in Comments.) It was also put together with the assistance of many other organizations, notably Selfhelp Innovations and their Virtual Senior Center. CAST page and videos... Continue Reading

One quarter of Americans trust mHealth apps as much as their doctor

A new survey by Philips reveals that one in four Americans trust mobile health resources as much as their own doctor…one in ten participants believed that without web-based health resources, they might already be dead or severely incapacitated. One in three participants believes that monitoring their health through mobile technology is the key to a long and healthy life…The implications of this information are far-reaching. Patients may not believe that their symptoms are worth the hassle of seeing their physician, and serious conditions may go undiagnosed. One quarter of Americans trust mHealth apps as much as their doctor EHR Intelligence... Continue Reading

Some ‘awards’ for 2012 digital health

David Shaywitz, co-founder of the Boston-based Center for Assessment Technology and Continuous Health (CATCH) and advocate for humanism in digital health [TA 6 Nov], surprises in his Forbes picks for digital health company, person and book of 2012. First, the company: the EHR that dominates large hospital systems, Epic. Why? It may be awful and the bane of M.D.s, but the hospital system gets basic connectivity that chains together the bits, in a proprietary way, delivered with ‘flawless implementation’–the kind of customer services that holds every hand in MIS and HIT until the boo-boo is better. In other words, they... Continue Reading