The confusion within TEC/telehealth between machine learning and AI-powered systems

Defining AI and machine learning terminology isn’t academic, but can influence your business. In reading a straightforward interview about the CarePredict wearable sensor for behavioral modeling and monitoring in an AI-titled publication, this Editor realized that AI–artificial intelligence–as a descriptor is creeping into all sorts of predictive systems which are actually based on machine learning. As TTA has written about previously [TTA 21 Aug], there are many considerations around AI, including the quality of the data being fed into the system, the control over the systems, and the ability to judge the output. Using the AI term sounds so much more ‘techie’–but it’s not accurate.

Artificial intelligence is defined as the broader application of machines being able to carry out tasks in a ‘smart’ way. Machine learning is tactical. It’s an application that assumes that we give the machine access to data and let the machine ‘learn’ on its own. Neural networks in computer design have made this possible. “Essentially it works on a system of probability – based on data fed to it, it is able to make statements, decisions or predictions with a degree of certainty.”, as stated in this Forbes article by Bernard Marr.

CarePredict has been incorporating many aspects of machine learning, particularly in its interface with the wrist-worn wearable and its interaction with sensors in a residence. It gathers more over time than older systems like QuietCare (this Editor was marketing head) and with more data, CarePredict does more and progressed beyond the relatively simple algorithms that created baselines in QuietCare. They now claim effective fall detection, patterns of grooming and feeding, and environment. (Disclosure: this Editor did freelance writing for the company in 2017)

In wishing CEO Satish Movva much success, this Editor believes that using AI to describe his system should be used cautiously. It makes it sound more complicated than it is to a primarily non-techie, senior community administrative and clinical audience. Say what you do in plain language, and you won’t go wrong. AI for Healthcare: Interview with Satish Movva, Founder & CEO of CarePredict

 

Categories: Latest News, Opinion, Soapbox, and Terminology.

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