The race to develop a blood glucose skin patch monitor speeds up with UCSD pilot

Are thin-film/adhesive patch glucose monitors the thing this year? University of California San Diego Health (UCSD Health)  opened earlier this month a clinical trial of their self-adhesive ‘tattoo’ type glucose monitor. This monitor measures the glucose present in perspiration through two electrodes embedded in the thin adhesive film that apply a small amount of electrical current to make glucose molecules in the skin rise. The clinical trial sampling people with Types 1 and 2 diabetes ages 18-60 with fasting plasma glucose (FPG) > 126 mg/dL, or hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) > 6.5%. Those in the trial will be comparing their readings from the thin film monitor with a standard glucometer through June 2019. Patients wearing the sensors will receive a minimum of two doses of pilocarpine gel to induce sweat, at fasting and at time points ranging between 15 to 200 minutes post meal. Neither the article nor the clinical trial explain the reading process.

In a Mobihealthnews interview with Patrick Mercier, codirector of UCSD’s Center for Wearable Sensors, the sensor can be produced for under $1, comparable to a blood glucose test strip.

Tattoo-type sensors and strips made the news about two-three years ago in their early stages of development and now are resurfacing with both trials and investment. Sano received $6 million from Fitbit for its combination of sensor and mobile app. The University of Bath has designed a multi-sensor patch that doesn’t need gel to raise a sweat; it measures interstitial fluid located between cells within the body-hair follicles [TTA 24 Apr]. We are rapidly moving towards less-invasive monitoring systems and better diabetes management.

UK-developed non-invasive skin patch monitors blood glucose; a ‘slow-mo’ injection to regulate it

[grow_thumb image=”http://telecareaware.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/diabetic-glucose-patch-1.jpg” thumb_width=”150″ /]A team from the University of Bath has developed a graphene-based blood glucose sensor that if successfully commercialized could eliminate the diabetic finger-stick. The sensor patch measures the interstitial fluid located between cells within the body-hair follicles–each mini sensor measures an individual follicle, where glucose collects in tiny reservoirs. The sensor patch can monitor every 10-15 minutes for continuous measurement. At this developmental point, readings are not sent to a smartphone. The researchers are focusing on optimizing the number of sensors in the patch, demonstrating successful use over 24 hours, and clinical trials. The University of Bath study with researchers from their Centre for Graphene Science, Centre for Nanoscience & Nanotechnology, and the Department of Pharmacy & Pharmacology, was published in Nature Nanotechnology in March. New Atlas

A possible combination? Treating Type 2 diabetes usually requires medication to regulate insulin. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP1) causes the pancreas to release insulin but has a short half-life. Researchers at Duke University have developed a way to bind GLP1 to a heat-sensitive elastin-like polypeptide which forms a gel-like depot that releases slowly into the body. In early tests with mice and monkeys, the ‘depot’ releases a constant rate of GLP1 for up to 14 days. The slower human metabolism means that this may be a feasible 14-30 day treatment–and translate to the controlled release of other medications. New Atlas

A salmagundi of (mainly free) opportunities to learn more about health technology this autumn (UK)

UKTI Belgium is running an excellent webinar series on eHealth & the European Union. Dates/times are:

  1. Thu, Nov 13, 2014 11:30 AM – 12:00 PM GMT
  2. Tue, Dec 2, 2014 11:30 AM – 12:00 PM GMT

During these webinars they will discuss tools that will enable you and your organisation to react to EU opportunities and challenges. For more information and to register go here.

TechUK and the BCS are running another of their very successful Healthtech Startup Schools, starting on Monday 20 October, ending on Monday 08 December. It is at techUK London , 10 St Bride Street, London , EC4A 4AD. Registration is here.

The University of Bath’s Assisted Living Action Network (ALAN) is holding an evening meeting in Bristol on 22nd October entitled on the flyer “Digital Health Apps: Insider views on the Challenges and Opportunities”, and on the website “Understanding the new regulatory and information environment for health apps”. It is being addressed by many worthies including Rob Turpin of BSI and Graham Worsley, recently retired from the TSB and now assembling a portoflio of really interesting roles. Book here

The GSMA has announced a whole bunch of awards for 2015 – entries are now open. Don’t dismiss them without checking each one out first – for example the Best Connected Life Award has eight categories, each with an award, including Best Mobile Innovation for Health. (If you wonder why this is under opportunities to learn (more…)