UK-developed non-invasive skin patch monitors blood glucose; a ‘slow-mo’ injection to regulate it

[grow_thumb image=”http://telecareaware.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/diabetic-glucose-patch-1.jpg” thumb_width=”150″ /]A team from the University of Bath has developed a graphene-based blood glucose sensor that if successfully commercialized could eliminate the diabetic finger-stick. The sensor patch measures the interstitial fluid located between cells within the body-hair follicles–each mini sensor measures an individual follicle, where glucose collects in tiny reservoirs. The sensor patch can monitor every 10-15 minutes for continuous measurement. At this developmental point, readings are not sent to a smartphone. The researchers are focusing on optimizing the number of sensors in the patch, demonstrating successful use over 24 hours, and clinical trials. The University of Bath study with researchers from their Centre for Graphene Science, Centre for Nanoscience & Nanotechnology, and the Department of Pharmacy & Pharmacology, was published in Nature Nanotechnology in March. New Atlas

A possible combination? Treating Type 2 diabetes usually requires medication to regulate insulin. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP1) causes the pancreas to release insulin but has a short half-life. Researchers at Duke University have developed a way to bind GLP1 to a heat-sensitive elastin-like polypeptide which forms a gel-like depot that releases slowly into the body. In early tests with mice and monkeys, the ‘depot’ releases a constant rate of GLP1 for up to 14 days. The slower human metabolism means that this may be a feasible 14-30 day treatment–and translate to the controlled release of other medications. New Atlas

Weapons in the Perpetual Battle of Stalingrad that is diabetes management

A major area for both medicine and for healthcare technology is managing diabetes–Type 1, Type 2 and also pre-diabetes, which is the term used to describe those who are on the path to Type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetics, because they have had it for years, usually since youth, have one battle and are fighting that Perpetual Battle of Stalingrad. As this Editor has noted previously, technological tools such as closed-loop systems that combine glucose sensors with insulin pumps take much of the constant monitoring load off the Type 1 person. [TTA 20 Aug, 5 Oct]

But the panel at MedCityNews’ ENGAGE touched on a point that rankles most pre-diabetics and Type 2 diabetics–the lack of empathy both healthcare and most people they know, including family, have for their chronic condition. Many feel personal shame. And digital health ‘solutions’ (a tired term, let’s retire it!–Ed. Donna) either drown the patient in data or send out, as Frank Westermann of Austria’s mySugr said, a lot of negative messaging. Adam Brickman of Omada Health, whose ‘Prevent’ programs are mainly through payers and employers, noted it was a real challenge to get people to change their lifestyle, but also change their state of mind. Their model includes peer support and health coaching, specifically to include that empathy. Home support also makes all ther difference between those who successfully manage their condition and those who don’t, according to Susan Guzman of the Behavioral Diabetes Institute. The approach is certainly not one-size-fits-all.  MedCityNews  In September, Omada received a sizable approval on its approach via a Series C round of $48 million. Current clients include Humana and Costco. Forbes attributes the size of the round to Omada’s approach in tying participant outcomes to over 50 percent of its compensation.