TTA’s Week: Babylon Health’s 81% diagnostic rate challenged, Canary Care re-emerges, CVS-Aetna’s Thanksgiving, top changes at Watson Health, more

 

 

Babylon Health’s AI diagnostic efficacy challenged. CVS-Aetna’s merger out of the oven by Thanksgiving. And a win for TECS with Canary Care.

Is Babylon Health’s AI on par with a human diagnostician? Claim questioned in ‘The Lancet’. (What $100 million should be solving)
Comings and goings: CVS-Aetna finalizing, Anthem sued over merger, top changes at IBM Watson Health 
Canary Care re-emerges as Canary Care Global Ltd, confirms continued operations (A happier outcome)

Was Pepper’s Question Time a media stunt that overshadowed the larger discussion around robotic disruption? And we wind up the UK telehealth event year.

Upcoming UK telecare and telehealth events; SEHTA calls for Healthcare Business Awards nominees (Winding up the year)
A critical take on Pepper’s Parliament Question Time (UK) (Larger questions on robotics’ effect were missed)

A robot speaks to a Commons select committee and may be more lively than most of the MPs. The FCC backs telehealth with $100 million plus, a report on NIH’s massive ‘All of Us’ population health initiative, and MIT’s emotional support robots. 

Pepper pays a first-ever robot visit to Commons on the future of AI and robotics on education, older adult care (UK) (Is the US Congress next?)
Connected Health Conference highlights (so far): FCC’s $100 million telehealth pilot, NIH’s ‘All of Us’, MIT’s social robots integrating AI

DNA analysis goes food shopping to prevent Type 2 diabetes in the prone. Zimmer uses Apple Watch to monitor hip/knee replacement patients. A Code of Practice for IoT in UK. Plus NYeC’s Gala Awards, MedStartr’s latest challenge at AMIA, and our international company news roundup.

DNA-based personalized food choices to prevent Type 2 diabetes onset in test with Imperial College, London and Waitrose (UK) (Combining DNA testing with food shopping)
Apple Watch, Zimmer Biomet in clinical trial for monitoring hip and knee replacements (Potentially huge impact on outcomes)
News roundup: Partners HealthCare Pivot Labs, TytoCare’s CE Mark, ISfTeH’s 2019 conference calls for presentations, three Smart Ageing Prizes awarded (From Bilbao to Boston)
MedStartr Challenge at the AMIA Annual Symposium 5 November (Pick your companies!)
NYeC’s 2018 Gala & Awards on 27 November (US) (Mix with the top folk in NY healthcare)
UK sets forth a Code of Practice for secure IoT for connected devices and smart homes (Sound guidelines, but enforcement?)

Digital health funding finally soars to the moon–in the home. BlackBerry is alive and Sparking, Withings is back. E-triggers to detect misdiagnosis. And are you going to Connected Health in Boston?

$6.8 bn in digital health funding through Q3 blows the doors off 2017: Rock Health (And the vote’s for in-home health)
It’s Alive! BlackBerry still Sparking with an ‘ultra-secure hyperconnectivity’ healthcare platform (Plugging the gap in EoT)
Diagnostic ‘e-triggers’ in EHRs to detect misdiagnosis, identify high-risk patients over time (Mining that data with machine learning and AI)
Withings returns to international markets with Steel HR Sport and a new Go (From Finland to France, and back to design heritage)
A preview of this week’s Connected Health Conference in Boston (Three days of immersion at the Seaport)

Lessons from Theranos for Silicon Valley? Are the new Apple Watch health features a mismatch to their market? Whither GEHC’s future within the Death Star? Will healthcare AI hype melt from a dash of cold water? Accreditation increasing provider burden?

The Theranos Story, ch. 57: was it Silicon Valley and Startup Culture bad practices pushed to the max? (The ‘hit to hope’ has two meanings)
Accrediting telehealth and remote patient monitoring providers (US) (Another try that may work this time, but increasing the training burden)
The Apple Watch, ECG and fall detection–a trend too far? (A market disconnect between those who buy and who actually need)
CEO change at GE may mean delay or cancellation of GE Healthcare spinoff–for good or ill (Time to destroy the Death Star?)
A sobering, mercifully hype-free view of AI in healthcare (A needed cold water bath)

Vital signs monitoring that reads people through walls and could revolutionize RPM.

No more smartwatches or connected tablets? Reading human vital signs through walls via a reverse Wi-Fi box and machine learning (A future without PERS, tablets, watches….)

Breaking news about 3rings and Canary Care. Babylon Health has no problem with funding–and spending. Cigna-Express Scripts clears DOJ. Two warnings about code running amuck if we don’t chill. More on Best Buy’s Assured Living. And more!

3rings assistive tech will be ringing off next March (UK) (Breaking news on yet another sad health tech closure)
Canary Care goes into administration, is acquired by Lifecycle Software (UK) (Breaking, but perhaps some hope)
AI promises, promises! Babylon Health to spend $100m, hire 1,000 to develop leading AI platform (Attracting funding like a magnet)
Cigna’s $69 million acquisition of Express Scripts clears US Department of Justice hurdle (But 50 hurdles lie ahead)
Weekend reading: the deadly consequences of unpredictable code (don’t be in a bike in front of a self-driving car)
IoT=Cyberdisaster, if we don’t chill innovation and secure it. It’s hip to be scared! (An argument for rational regulation)
Best Buy update: ‘Assured Living’ assuredly up and running. And was this Editor’s in-store experience not typical? (Should have the Geeks to the house for the TV)


Have a job to fill? Seeking a position? Free listings available to match our Readers with the right opportunities. Email Editor Donna.


Read Telehealth and Telecare Aware: http://telecareaware.com/  @telecareaware

Follow our pages on LinkedIn and on Facebook

We thank our present and past advertisers and supporters: Tynetec, Eldercare, UK Telehealthcare, NYeC, PCHAlliance, ATA, The King’s Fund, HIMSS, Health 2.0 NYC, MedStartr, Parks Associates, and HealthIMPACT.

Reach international leaders in health tech by advertising your company or event/conference in TTA–contact Donna for more information on how we help and who we reach. See our advert information here. 


Telehealth & Telecare Aware: covering the news on latest developments in telecare, telehealth, telemedicine and health tech, worldwide–thoughtfully and from the view of fellow professionals

Thanks for asking for update emails. Please tell your colleagues about this news service and, if you have relevant information to share with the rest of the world, please let me know.

Donna Cusano, Editor In Chief
donna.cusano@telecareaware.com

– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

Canary Care re-emerges as Canary Care Global Ltd, confirms continued operations

Canary Care, which entered administration in late August, has been reorganized and continues as Canary Care Global Ltd, remaining in Abingdon. The purchaser in the pre-packaged sale, as Readers learned here, is Lifecycle Software Ltd. Their marketing office sent a release last week confirming their operations. Stuart Butterfield, who answered our inquiries in September, is now managing and technical director. He is quoted in the release: “This is a really positive development for our company. We will continue to provide the Canary Care product and service that our existing customers know and love. Our new owner provides us with the stability and resources to further enhance the Canary Care offering and we’re very excited and optimistic about the future and the opportunity to bring Canary Care to a wider audience.”

The administrator’s latest filing with Companies House is clearly a wrapup of the sale as the best possible outcome for the company. Shareholders included major investor Mercia Fund Management. A quick read of the administrator’s proposal is an object lesson how quickly an insolvency can happen. In section 2, the company went from seeking fresh funding to expand markets in May, having been turned down by Mercia due to their funding criteria, to having an interested buyer who ultimately was not approved by the shareholders by a hairsbreadth, to insolvency by August.

We do wish Canary Care luck with their new ownership and success in this very difficult time for acceptance of –and payment for–telecare and TECS services. Release (PDF) Hat tip to Nicola Hughes of Lifecycle Software

Upcoming UK telecare and telehealth events; SEHTA calls for Healthcare Business Awards nominees.

Winding up the year….

Managing digital change in health and care/The King’s Fund/Thursday 22 November/8.30am-4.30pm/The Met Hotel, King Street, Leeds, LS1 2HQ

This conference aims to support health and social care organisations that are looking to undertake large-scale digital change, no matter what their current level of technological advancement. Understand the factors that contribute to successful change by showcasing the experiences of different case study sites and Global Digital Exemplars that have already made significant progress. More information and registration here

UK Telehealthcare has several events coming up all over the country. For more information and registration, click here or the advert in the right sidebar and scroll down to ‘Members Events Coming Up’.

8th November 2018 – Suppliers’ Forum, Hammersmith Town Hall, King St. London W6 9JU
9th November 2018 – Providers’ Forum, Hammersmith Town Hall, King St. London W6 9JU
14th November 2018 – CECOPs Digital Health Masterclass, Carisbrooke Hall, Victory Services Club, 63-79 Seymour Street, London, W2 2HF
5th December 2018 – CECOPs Digital Health Masterclass, 2 Brewery Wharf, Kendell Street, Leeds, LS10 1JR.

UK HealthTech/4 December/Cardiff Park Plaza

At the UKHT conference, over 300 delegates will hear speakers discuss the major strategic issues and policy developments facing the life science and healthcare sectors. Showcases include the latest advances in R&D technologies and up and coming spinout companies. It closes with the 13th annual MediWales Innovation Awards, celebrating the achievements of the NHS, life science and health technology communities in Wales. More information and registration here.

SEHTA is calling for nominees for its 2018 Healthcare Business Awards through Friday 14 December. They are looking for the best achieving companies of 2018 in the following five categories: Export Achievement, Start-up, Innovation, Partnership with the NHS
MedTech, and the new category of Healthcare Investment of the Year (most significant/transformational public and/or private sector funding received in 2018). To download application forms, click here. Completed forms should be returned to Clare Ansett – clare.ansett@sehta.co.uk 

Who’s available? A user training professional with experience in security, social alarm, and telecare control rooms

Mr. Paul Dixon has taken advantage of our open offer to Readers who are available to lend their talents to new or established companies in the healthcare or healthcare tech field. 

I am a “tech-savvy” and experienced user training professional with extensive experience in providing training in a broad range of contexts and environments. I am specifically experienced in security, social alarm and telecare control rooms. As I also have a background in management and leadership, one of my key differentiators is that I focus on behavioural change in staff, not just on “mechanical” user processes.

In addition to training, I can create a full range of user-focused training materials.

Mr. Dixon was kind enough to include a comprehensive overview of how he can contribute to a company. He’s available for short and medium term projects as a freelancer, or on-going user training on an ad-hoc or retainer basis. Contact him on (m) 07734 600950 (UK) or paul@pauld.pro.  He’s on Twitter at @PaulWBM.

International acquisition roundup: Doro and Welbeing; Teladoc and Advance Medical

Two international telecare/telehealth/telemedicine M&A deals made the news this last week.

Sweden’s Doro AB acquired Welbeing, headquartered in Eastbourne UK. Welbeing (formally Wealden and Eastbourne Lifeline) is a telecare provider of home-based personal alarms which supports about 75,000 residents in local systems. Their revenue in last fiscal year (ending 9/17) was £7.6 million (SEK 90m). Doro operates in the UK and about 40 countries, with a core business in mobile phones specially designed for older adults. Their Doro Care solutions provide digital telecare and social services for older adults and the disabled in the home. Doro is paying SEK 130 million (£11.1 million) for the acquisition of Welbeing, equal to eight times estimated EBITDA for the financial year 2017/2018, with 85 percent cash and 15 percent in Doro shares with a bonus based on financial performance. Release 

Making a few headlines in the US is telemedicine leader Teladoc’s purchase of Barcelona’s Advance Medical for a hefty $352 million, giving Teladoc a major international footprint especially valuable for its corporate clients and major payers. Advance Medical provides complete telemedicine services in 125 countries in over 20 languages. Even more valuable is their knowledge of local healthcare delivery systems, global expert medical opinion, and chronic care. The acquisition also gives Teladoc an international network of offices and a significant entreé with international health insurance companies. Mobihealthnews, Seeking Alpha (Teladoc investor slideshow)

UK roundup: CCIO Simon Eccles warns against ‘shiny objects’, NHS Liverpool CCG award to Docobo, 87% concerned with NHS info security

[grow_thumb image=”http://telecareaware.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/Lasso.jpg” thumb_width=”100″ /]NHS Digital CCIO doesn’t like ‘shiny objects’. Dr. Simon Eccles used his first NHS Digital board meeting as national CCIO to encourage delivering the current agenda first and not getting distracted by the ‘shiny objects’ of new innovations which also divert funding. “It is our collective challenge to make sure that doesn’t happen to things that are valued by the NHS – to do what we said we’d do and not be too distracted by new and shiny things.” This seems to be at odds with non-executive director Daniel Benton, who “suggested that NHS Digital needed to become more flexible as an organisation so that it was in a better position to roll with the punches in future.” Digital Health News

Docobo announced their win of the NHS Liverpool Clinical Commissioning Group‘s scale up of telehealth as part of the Healthy Liverpool program. The three to five-year contract has a maximum value of £11.5 million. The current Mi Programme (More Independent) partly funded by the Innovate UK dallas initiative and using Philips equipment is at 900 patients with 5,300 total patients since 2013. The plan is to scale up the program to 4-5,000 patients a year and support new clinical pathways and conditions including lung conditions, heart failure, and diabetes. Docobo’s platform is Doc@Home which uses patient information from the CarePortal device or their own digital devices. Docobo release. NHS Innovation Accelerator, Digital Health News

A survey of 500 British adults conducted by UK IT VAR Proband found that perceptions of public sector information security are poor. 87 percent were concerned about the security of their information with the NHS. Of that 87 percent, 34 percent were ‘very concerned’ about their cybersecurity. Taking this with a grain of salt, 80 percent distrusted security at the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) and 78 percent on data held by the police. The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) can’t come too soon [TTA 17 Feb] — but are you ready? More in Proband’s Online Security Audit (PDF).

The UTOPIA Project evaluation of telecare in social care report published (UK)

[grow_thumb image=”http://telecareaware.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/Utopia-project-report-2018.jpg” thumb_width=”150″ /]An important and comprehensive evaluation of telecare in use in UK social care has been published this past week by King’s College London. The UTOPIA Project (Using Telecare for Older People In Adult social care) surveyed local authority telecare managers (114 valid responses or 75 percent of responders) November 2016-January 2017 to find out how telecare is being used by local authority adult social care departments in England to support older people.

This study springboards from the £80m Whole System Demonstrator (WSD) and its “curious neglect” by those engaged in UK telecare. The WSD’s findings contradicted earlier research in finding that telecare did not have long-term improvement of outcomes, gauged after only 12 months. It created, in the UTOPIA’s study’s terms, a ‘policy problem’ among major stakeholders. “The WSD remains an important study and its neglect is curious. The research team wondered why the findings had been overlooked and what, if any, consequences might have flowed from this.” The study thus looks at local authority aims, how local evidence is being collected, and how telecare is operationalized and delivered.

The areas surveyed and some highlights of the findings are:

  • Use of research: 33 percent were informed by research and 47 percent were aware of but did not agree with the WSD’s findings which were negative on the long-term value of telecare.
  • Where does telecare fit in?:  “Telecare ‘fitted’ best if it was provided alongside social care (77%), to support reablement (77%), for people eligible for and funded by the adult social care department (75%) as well as for people who pay for their own care (75%).” Only 24 percent collaborated with the NHS or other partners. There was full (100 percent) agreement that telecare helps to reduce risk and promote safety and 81 percent agreement that it supports unpaid carers. 
  • Achieving strategic aims and monitoring of progress: Over half (53 percent) of respondents said their local authority was accredited to the Telecare Services Association (TSA) Codes of Practice for Telecare and Telehealth. 
  • Barriers and facilitators: Barriers mentioned were skill deficits among professionals and installers, as well as contract inflexibility with suppliers. There was also concern about the reduction of face-to-face contact and care. Access to telecare and availability of advice and support were good for both users and family carers, but levels of awareness about it were only average.
  • Financial commitment: Not surprisingly, funding is scarce and usually cobbled together from several sources including local authorities, CCGs, and users. 24 percent felt it saved money but many found it difficult to provide hard evidence.
  • What’s considered in telecare assessments?:  Nearly all (92 percent) agreed that a key assessment included the user’s ability to move around, their memory status, the person’s ability to communicate, and their daily routines. Flipping the script, “40% of respondents said that their local authority’s telecare assessment focused on what it was hoped would be achieved through using telecare.”
  • Who are the assessors, and is assessment always required?(more…)

Tender Alert: Oxfordshire County Council, Housing & Care 21 Birmingham

Our Tender Watcher, Susanne Woodman, has two more before we break for the holiday season–which may make your 2018 brighter!

  • Oxfordshire County Council: This is for a comprehensive telecare service for call monitoring of telecare alarms, a 24/7 emergency response service for telecare alarms, plus the installation, assessment and review of telecare and associated equipment. The Service Provider(s) will work closely with the Equipment Service Provider. This starts in April 2018 for five years with option to extend for two; value not correctly posted (£1?). Closing 15 January 2018. Gov.UK 
  • Housing and Care 21: This is an open future opportunity for providers to indicate interest in providing a new warden call supplier to maintain the existing stock of warden call products across the estate. The contract will be for one to five years with funding of £500k per year. This includes bridging equipment from analogue to digital. The approach to market date is 9 April 2018 with a start date of 1 July. More information at Gov.UK.

Tender/Prior Information Alerts: North Yorkshire, North Ayrshire

Susanne Woodman, our Eye on Tenders, has located more complete information on a North Yorkshire tender we listed on 7 Nov and a prior information notice by North Ayrshire for a contract to be published next month.

  • North Yorkshire: The North Yorkshire County Council has listed full information on the tender for Assistive Technology services for North Yorkshire. It is for technology, monitoring and support to extend healthier independent living in the home and reduce demand on social care services. It is a three-year contract (extension up to 24 additional months) valued at £4.85 m. Bids close on 17 January 2018. TED–Tenders Electronic Daily 
  • North Ayrshire (Scotland): This Prior Information Request by North Ayrshire Council is for a 24/7/365 call handling system which is fully compatible with alarm equipment and telecare peripherals installed or provided by the Council in the full North Ayrshire Council area which includes the islands of Arran and Cumbrae. There are about 4,200 services users of primarily Tunstall equipment with a volume of 21,000 to 28,500 calls per month. The contract will be from 01 September 2018 to 31 August 2019. The contract will be published on 4 Dec. Public Contracts Scotland and TED

Impact of IP telephony on UK telecare systems

The Telecare Services Association (TSA) in the UK has recently released a white paper addressing the impact of a fundamental change to the [grow_thumb image=”http://telecareaware.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/connecting-people-saving-lives.jpg” thumb_width=”150″ /]UK Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN) that is now being contemplated. This change will eventually see the replacement of the current PSTN and Integrated Services Digital Network landline networks with IP telephony (the type of phone connectivity that has been commonly used in most modern office environments for some years).

Two years ago BT, who essentially owns practically the whole of the UK PSTN, proposed that the change of their network would be completed in 2025.

This has an impact on the telecare services to the extent that many telecare alarm devices in use connect to the call centres via the PSTN and hence such devices and/or the infrastructure used by suppliers of such services will need to be upgraded when the underlying network is changed. There are, according to the TSA paper, 1.7 million users of such devices in the UK.

The TSA is essentially the UK industry body for telecare and telehealth and as such it is understandably trying to raise awareness of the need for both the commissioners and suppliers of these services to prepare for the change. This paper is said to be a result of gathering views from “key stakeholders” related to this change.

The potential impact, however, seems to be somewhat exaggerated. It should be remembered that the UK very successfully underwent another major switch-over not that long ago in 2012 – from analogue to digital TV. It required every analogue TV in the country to be either fitted with a set top box or replaced with a digital TV.

TSA also suggest that this changeover be used as an opportunity to roll out more internet based digital health functionality to end users. Of course, such functionality is already widely appearing in the form of health monitors, exercise and medication reminders etc. and are not dependent on the switch over. So it is unfortunate that the paper flips between the two topics and asserts a dependence of internet based digital services on the PSTN switch-over.

The document feels more like marketing material than a white paper with about 1/3 of it taken up by irrelevant photographs of random happy smiling or laughing (mostly older) people. It reminded me of some of the material that came out the the 3 Million Lives project. If only our elderly people living alone or in our care homes were as happy as this!

The paper is available to download here.

BioSensics’ Huntington’s Disease remote monitor gains NIH grant

[grow_thumb image=”http://telecareaware.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/PAMSysMotionSensorWHITE.jpg” thumb_width=”125″ /]Watertown, Massachusetts-based BioSensics announced that the company has received a $2.5 million, two-year grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to develop a continuous remote monitor for Huntington’s disease motor symptoms. The HDWear monitor uses BioSensics’ PAMSys sensor technology tested during pilot work performed with the University of Rochester Medical Center and Teva Pharmaceuticals. The study, published in the Journal of Huntington’s Disease (2016, Vol. 5, pp. 199-206), demonstrated a wearable sensor solution for remotely monitoring the severity of upper extremity chorea in Huntington’s disease.

The study will also use the HDWear monitor for a clinical study on patient response to anti-chorea medication or subtle motor abnormalities in the premanifest stage of Huntington’s disease.

It is interesting that the press release uses ‘telecare’ for HDWear, which is not much used in the US for behavioral monitoring though perfectly correct. HDWear’s use here builds on the company’s earlier sensors-based systems for telehealth, physical activity monitoring, fall risk assessment and detection. This Editor notes that BioSensics is one of the older telehealth companies still operating (2007), and now is primarily using its devices in research studies. Drug Discovery & Development,  Release.  Hat tip to Guy Dewsbury via LinkedIn (again)

Equivocal long term telemonitoring studies released by Telemonitoring NI, U. of Wisconsin

The HSC Public Health Agency for Northern Ireland and Queen’s University Belfast have released an evaluation of the six-year (2011 – 2017) Remote Telemonitoring Service for Northern Ireland (RTNI). The Centre for Connected Health and Social Care (CCHSC) launched the Telemonitoring NI project in 2011, which enrolled over 3,900 patients with COPD, diabetes, weight management, stroke, heart failure and kidney problems in both telehealth (vital sign) and telecare (behavioral) monitoring. The study period was through 2015, but the program continues to be implemented by all five NI Health and Social Care (HSC) Trusts across a range of chronic conditions. 

The Northern Ireland findings were at best equivocal. While the qualitative data gathered from patient, carer, and clinician focus groups and interviews were positive in terms of engagement and on reassurance–to be able to carry on with their lives as usual–the quantitative data did not confirm gains in effective care.

Although there were a number of testimonials from the participants in the patient focus groups regarding
reduced hospitalisations and a reduced need to attend outpatient clinics, this did not carry through to
the data obtained in the effectiveness aspect of the current evaluation. In general terms, the number
of hospitalisations, length of hospital stay and outpatient clinic attendance (and therefore overall cost
of healthcare provision) did not differ between the quasi-control ‘never installed’ group and any of the
groups who received some amount of telemonitoring. The results, where they were statistically
significant, were largely driven by an anomalous result for the heart failure ‘never installed’ group. (page 17)

The Executive Summary, Telehealth, and Telecare Reports are available for free download on the HSC R&D Division website. Many thanks to former TTA Ireland Editor Toni Bunting for the information, summary, and researching the previous TTA coverage below.

This is the second discouraging study on the long term effectiveness of patient monitoring released in the past month. A five-year, 140,000 patient/90 provider study conducted by the University of Wisconsin found that giving patients the option of telemedicine, instead of being more convenient for the provider, created new issues. It increased office visits by six percent, added 45 minutes per month of additional visit time to practices, and reduced the number of new patients seen each month by 15 percent. For the patient, the researchers found “no observable improvement in patient health between those utilizing e-visits and those who did not. In fact, the additional office visits appear to crowd out some care to those not using e-visits.” The study suggested that the telemedicine visits could be made more effective by structured questions prior to the visit. (This approach has been taken by telemedicine provider Zipnosis with adaptive online interviews and patient triage.) Mobihealthnews

Previous commentary by TTA’s Editor Emeritus Steve Hards on the procurement of the NI Remote Telemonitoring Service:

http://archive1.telecareaware.com/the-long-and-winding-road-that-leads-to-your-doorin-northern-ireland/
http://archive1.telecareaware.com/african-elephant-ecch/
http://archive1.telecareaware.com/remote-telemonitoring-northern-ireland-service-tender-long-list-mystery/
http://archive1.telecareaware.com/short-listed-companies-rtni-service/
http://archive1.telecareaware.com/northern-ireland-remote-monitoring-servicegoes-to-tf3/

 

Tender Alert: NHS England–IAPT, Arden & GEM, Yorkshire and The Humber

Susanne Woodman, our Eye on Tenders, has three that cover a major initiative of NHS England, plus two regional telecare projects.

  • NHS England–IAPT (Improving Access to Psychological Therapies). NHS Shared Business Services is procuring ‘Digital Therapies for IAPT Assessment: Project Management Organisation’. The aim of the programme is to find good quality, evidence-based digital therapy packages for use in IAPT services. Up to 14 digital therapy products will be assessed for IAPT by 2020. This will help expand provision of psychological therapies, as well as improving access to digital services, both goals set out in the Five Year Forward View for Mental Health. Clarification questions are due by Wednesday 13 September at 10am. Bid deadline is Monday 18 September at noon. More information and contact here on Gov.UK Contracts Finder. Additional programme information on NICE and IAPT here.
  • Arden & Greater East Midlands: Bravo reference Project 851 is an Innovation and Technology Tariff. There are three parts (2-4): the closest related to health tech is #4, web-based applications for the self-management of COPD. Deadline is 2 October 2017 at 5pm. More information and application links on the Arden-GEM website here.
  • Yorkshire and The Humber: Kirklees Council is seeking a provider of assistive technology and telecare solutions aimed at supporting vulnerable people to live safely and independently in their own home. This also includes support for existing and future social care applications, lone workers, and building security. Value of the contract is £210,000. Deadline is 2 October 2017. There’s not a lot of information on the Gov.UK page and it directs questions to the Kirklees coordinator.

Tender Alerts: Warwickshire, Thurrock, and Hertfordshire

Susanne Woodman of BRE, our Eye on Tenders, alerts our Readers to two open and one probable new tenders:

  • Nuneaton and Bedworth Borough Council (NBBC) in Warwickshire is seeking a 24/7 ‘reactive repair service’ for Tunstall telecare equipment presently in 35 independent living accommodations. The contract is for an initial period of two years, with two optional one-year extensions. Closing is 4 August. Details here.
  • Thurrock Council in Essex is seeking “to appoint a Consultant who will work as Project Manager with Adult Social Care and Health staff to develop an Assistive Technology Strategy and support implementation of the strategy.” The contract is valued at £25-50,000. Interest must be registered by 28 July at the Council’s Delta eSourcing page. On the Council page there is additional information in a summary of the Council’s of the Careline service and a resolution to expand/upgrade assistive technology for local users. 

Not registered as a tender yet is a plan by Hertfordshire County Council to bring wearables such as activity trackers and software-enabled clothing into the homes of at-risk local adults, plus online systems for video-link calls, scheduling messages and reminders for people to take their medication and connect with families. This article in the Watford Observer tells some of the story but the page on the Hertfordshire blog is oddly missing–however, captured by the sharp-eyed Ms. Woodman here. They advise monitoring the Herts County Council on social media–right now they are burning up Twitter @hertscc on the alphabet countdown to potholes and fire safety tips from Reqs the Fire Dog!

Tender Alert: Scotland Excel, Leeds, London/Manchester, Thurrock

Our Eye on Tenders, Susanne Woodman of BRE, has a new batch for your telehealth business consideration. (Thank you, Susanne!)

  • Scotland Excel: A Prior Information Notice (PIN) for suppliers of “digital dispersed alarm units that communicate information digitally between alarm unit and alarm centre”. They are invited to note interest to Scotland Excel and to demonstrate what digital equipment they can currently offer, including any relevant peripherals, such as alarm triggers. The estimated date for the contract notice is February 2018. More information on Public Contracts Scotland.
  • Leeds City Council: A £400k contract for telecare equipment is on offer for North East, Yorkshire and The Humber. This includes alarm units, fall detection, pendants, multiple sensors, and more. It is a 12 month framework with approval obtained to re-procure for the following two subsequent years, expiring 31st March 2020. Submit by 17 July. More information on Gov.UK.
  • General Medical Council, North West (Manchester) and London: An unusual tender for research comparing UK health regulators to counterparts in overseas countries (i.e. Canada, US, Australia, New Zealand or European member states). This covers the regulation of doctors, other healthcare providers (e.g. pharmacists) and healthcare services. Submit by 17 July. More information on Gov.UK.
  • Thurrock Council: This is for community alarm telecare monitoring and administration platforms, with all associated hardware required. Value stated is £100k – £500k, and contract ends 31 July 2021. Submit by 17 July. More information on Gov.UK.

GreatCall’s acquisition: a big vote for older adult-centered healthcare tech

This midweek’s Big News has been the acquisition of the mobile phone/PERS company GreatCall by Chicago private equity firm GTCR. Cost of the acquisition is not disclosed. GTCR stated that they expect to make capital investments to GreatCall to fund future acquisitions and internal growth. GreatCall has over 800,000 subscribers in the US, generates about $250 million in profitable revenue annually, and employs about 1,000 people mainly in the San Diego area and Nevada. According to press sources, senior management led by CEO David Inns will remain in place and run the company independently. 

Our US Readers know of GreatCall’s long-standing (since 2006), bullseye-targeted appeal to older adults who desire a simple mobile flip phone, the Jitterbug, but has moved along with the age group to a simple smartphone with built-in health and safety apps. Along the way, GreatCall also developed and integrated the 5Star mPERS services on those phones, served by their own 24/7 emergency call center and developed an mPERS with fall detection. Their own acquisitions included the remnants of the Lively telecare home monitoring system in 2015 [TTA 5 Dec 15], adding the Lively Wearable mPERS/fitness tracker to their line; and senior community telecare service Healthsense last December. The original Lively home system and safety watch are sold in the UK (website) but apparently not the Jitterbug. In the UK and EU, the Jitterbug line would be competitive with established providers such as Doro.

What’s different here? GTCR is not a flashy, Silicon Valley PE investing in hot, young startups or a traditional senior health investor like Ziegler. Its portfolio is diversified into distinctly non-cocktail-chatter companies in financial services and technology; technology, media and telecommunications (including an outdoor ad company!); and growth businesses. It has real money, investing over $12 billion in 200 companies since 1980, and strategically prefers leadership companies. Their healthcare businesses have primarily been in life sciences, specialty pharma, dermatology, specialty services such as healthcare in correctional institutions, and device sterilization. Recent acquisitions have been San Diego-based XIFIN, a provider of cloud-based software to diagnostic service providers, RevSpring in billing and communications, and data analytics firm Cedar Gate Technologies. It also has partnered with newly formed medical device companies.

GreatCall crosses over into GTCR’s telecommunications sweet spot, but the older adult market and direct-to-consumer sell are different for them. Because it is unique in their portfolio, this Editor believes that GTCR sees ‘gold’ in the ‘silver’ market. Larry Fey, one of their managing directors, cited its growth and also GreatCall’s recent moves into senior communities with their products. GTCR also has expertise in the security alarm monitoring sector, which along with pharma clinical trials can bolster better utilization and broaden the utilization of GreatCall’s call centers.

However, this Editor would caution that the US senior community market has been having difficult times of late with overbuilding, declining occupancy, resident/labor turnover, and rising expenses–as well as recent coverage of security lapses and resident abuse. Telecare systems like Healthsense are major capital expenses, but the flip side is that communities can use technology to improve care, resident safety, and to differentiate themselves. To make the most of their Healthsense acquisition, GreatCall needs to bring innovation to the V1.0 monitoring/safety/care model that Healthsense is in its current state, and make the case for that innovation in cost/financials, usability and reliability. San Diego Union-Tribune, Mobihealthnews