Xcertia takes another pass at app certification, but will it fly? (US)

[grow_thumb image=”http://telecareaware.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/alp-mountains-peaks-in-winter.jpg” thumb_width=”150″ /]An app developer and a healthcare/digital health innovation lab get into the certification game. Can they fly over the treacherous peaks this time? Social Wellth made good on their promise (or threat?) to get into the app vetting business this past week through announcing a partnership with Columbia University-based HITLAB at the HITLAB Summit this week to develop a certification organization known as Xcertia. Last year, Social Wellth acquired the remains of Happtique from GNYHA Ventures [TTA 12 Dec 14]. The Xcertia principles center around privacy, security, operability and content–as Happtique’s did. The intent is to not only develop a program to certify apps based on established standards, but also form a Signature Steering Committee to ensure they maintain “their definitive set of criteria for evaluating mobile health apps.” MedCityNews, release

Possible conflict of interest. It all sounds positive, but the head of Xcertia, David Vinson, is also the CEO of Social Wellth, which despite its nonprofit-ish name makes its living by developing consumer apps and “dashboards” for insurance companies, a task grandly called (from their press release) “the curation of digital health experiences by leveraging mobile health technologies that allow for integration and aggregation of all digital assets.” Social Wellth also makes quite a bit of hay on its website about app curation for its clients. (more…)

When disruptive healthcare tech disrupts the wrong things, including safety

[grow_thumb image=”http://telecareaware.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/Thomas.jpg” thumb_width=”150″ /]Last week’s Health 2.0 conference was (of course) a three-ring circus of new technology and its corollary, a lot of hype. An astute writer new to this Editor, Michael Millenson, draws together the key points of two prominent, but not hyped speakers there: Robert Wachter, MD and Michael Blum, MD, both practicing in University of California San Francisco’s (UCSF) medical center. Dr Wachter, chief of the Division of Hospital Medicine, has been profiled in these pages earlier this year in a review of an excerpt from his book, The Digital Doctor: Hope, Hype and Harm at the Dawn of Medicine’s Computer Age. There he wrote about the example of Pablo Garcia, nearly dying from over-prescribed doses of an antibiotic that a chain of errors in their EHR started. Dr Blum is Director of UCSF’s Center for Digital Health Innovation. But their points are on the same track: “the danger of disruptive technology that disrupts the wrong things: upsets checks and balances that keep patients safe, makes working conditions more stressful and simply doesn’t play well with others.” His conclusions are on the money: #1, it’s not the technology but the adaptive change that front and back line clinicians will need to make; #2, entrepreneurs with whiz-bang tech that zips data to the clinician without fitting it into a care process are doomed to fail; #3 some kind of curation is needed. But whether that will be Care Innovations’ Validation Institute or Social Wellth (which purchased the late Happtique from GNYHA) is another story. Key for Health IT Entrepreneurs: Don’t Disrupt the Wrong Thing (Forbes)

ATA in the accreditation arena for online patient visits

[grow_thumb image=”http://telecareaware.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/ata-seal-of-accreditation.png” thumb_width=”150″ /]The American Telemedicine Association (ATA) has joined the gold rush of accreditation, in this case for online ‘virtual’ visits between doctor and patient only. US providers (only) can apply to ATA’s Accreditation Program for Online Patient Consultations through a multi-step process for vetting up to three years.

  • First round application clears a company for eligibility. Through 28 Feb 2015, it is also open to ATA members only: Institutional Members, Sustaining President’s Circle and President’s Circle. On 1 March it will open to all companies in the US. Canada accreditation will start at a date to be announced in 2015.
  • Once eligible, the second round application contains ATA Administrative Rules & Terms, Standards and Guidance, Application Form, Program Overview and Fee Schedule. Fees are annual, based on the numbers of providers of online, real-time patient consults in all service lines, which presumably means areas such as primary care, behavioral, pediatric etc.
  • The company provides an application and supporting documentation. ATA then conducts a survey to review the documentation, online resources and demonstration of online services. During the process, ATA says it will notify about areas which are not compliant and organizations will have the opportunity to “provide a plan of corrective action and present corrective materials to show compliance before a final decision regarding accreditation is rendered.”
  • The accreditation is valid for three years, contingent on submitting an Annual Accreditation Report at the beginning of year 2 and 3 of its accreditation cycle.

Of interest to your Editors and readers is how this accreditation was developed.  (more…)