NYeC’s 2017 Gala and Awards (NYC) 1 November

Wednesday, 1 November at the Edison Ballroom, NYC, 6:30pm

The New York eHealth Collaborative, which promotes healthcare in NY State and elsewhere by leading, connecting, and integrating health information exchanges in New York, will again host their annual evening Gala and Awards in NYC. This year the lead award (Transformative Leadership) will be awarded to David Blumenthal, MD, President of The Commonwealth Fund (the home of the Triple Aim). Having been to this event in the past, it is attended by the leadership of most major health organizations in New York such as New York-Presbyterian, NYU-Langone, Maimonides, and payers such as Aetna. Click here for more information and for tickets. The revenues support the work of NYeC in promoting interoperability through entities such as the Statewide Health Information Network for New York (SHIN-NY), which links New York’s eight regional health information organizations (RHIOs) or Qualified Entities (QEs) throughout the state. They also fund NYeC’s work in developing policies and standards supporting the use of health IT and EHR adoption. Hat tip to Jesse Giuliani of NYeC and Sarianne Gruber of Answers Media.

EHRs can’t exchange patient records? $$ in workarounds.

Some of the Excedrin/Panadol Headaches (#11, #14, #23 and #54) in healthcare are around the very ‘miracle technology’ that was supposed to make it all seamless, non-duplicative, time/cost-effective and coast-to-coast–EHRs. The exchange of patient records between hospitals, within health systems between sites and with medical practices plus vice versa–works haltingly if at all. It works best within well-established, highly integrated delivery systems –the VA, DOD, Mayo Clinic, Kaiser, Geisinger, Intermountain Healthcare. But once you’re away from it–good luck. Where are the problems? The closed standards of the major hospital EHRs–Epic, Cerner, Allscripts, McKesson and brethren; the extreme customization most health systems demand (nay, a major Epic selling point!); structured versus unstructured data and how handled; a lack of a secure interoperability standard are but a few. Where is the gold? Getting patient health records exchanged, accessible and transportable, among systems that were essentially designed not to speak with each other. (more…)

Patients’ records could be shared between NI and New York for clinical trials!

Patients’ records could be shared between Northern Ireland and New York as part of a proposal to improve healthcare and research. NI Health Minister, Edwin Poots was recently in the US for high-level talks about developing the collaboration with the New York State Health Department. Read more… TANN Ireland

Editor Donna note: Though not stated, this well could take advantage of the expansion of the SHIN-NY health information exchange (HIE) connecting hospitals, medical practices and nursing homes along with medication and management interfaces. See NYeC Digital Health Conference 2013, especially the link to the HITECH Answers article which has more information on SHIN-NY. 

NYeC Digital Health Conference 2013: the trends

Updated 21 November

The third annual New York eHealth Collaborative (NYeC) Digital Health Conference in New York City attracted several hundred people from the worlds of hospitals, public health, academia, policy makers and health insurers–and the myriad related products and services which will enable these entities to improve their health IT, organization and engage patients in their own health. If there were three buzzword phrases setting the tone, they were interoperability, patient portals and technological innovation. All relate to data–data transfer of patient records between providers to be available regionally (RHIOs) and throughout the state via the SHIN-NY health information exchange (HIE); using data to help people visualize and improve their health;  putting data into ‘whole person’ context for providers, integrating it into workflows and to save lives; using data to serve process improvement and tougher standards. And finally there is that old devil cost: reducing the cost of care, reducing expensive readmissions plus co-morbidities and making those tools to do this job more affordable for providers and patients.

NYeC has developed considerably since its early days seven years ago (more…)