September-Autumn Events: The King’s Fund, Aging2.0 London, Health 2.0 NYC, RSM, ATA

Summer is evaporating before our eyes. Fill your calendars to shake off the blues! Here are some events that depending on where you are, should go on it:

At The King’s Fund, London:

Monday 4 September, 5:30-8:30pm: HealthChat with Claire Murdoch and Roy Lilley. Ms. Murdoch is Chief Executive of Central & North West London NHS Trust and NHSE’s new National Mental Health Director. Tickets are £39.95 through Eventbrite here. (Note: this is a private event organized by UK HealthGateway, the publisher of the nhsManagers.net newsletter.)

We thank Roy Lilley for the top-of-the-letter mention of our recent article on telemedicine and retail healthcare. Until today, this Editor was not aware that the NHS was the largest purchaser in the UK of fax machines. Will Sarah Wilkinson’s appointment as the head of NHS Digital change that?)

Friday 6 October, 12.00pm-7.00pm: Ideas that change health care–a festival of ideas to inspire and challenge the future of health care. Free, but tickets are limited. Sponsorships available. More information here. #kfIdeas17

Wednesday 29 – Thursday 30 November, 8.30am – 5.15pm both days: The King’s Fund Annual Conference 2017. Day 1 concentrates on population health, Day 2 on modernizing the health and care system. More information here. #kfAnnual2017

Aging2.0 London at Innovation Warehouse

Thursday 7 September, 6-9pm: Aging2.0 London 2-Pint-0 presents Chris Sawyer from Innovate UK on the Digital Health Technology Catalyst 2017 – Round 1 [TTA 14 Aug]. More information here.

Health 2.0 NYC/MedStartr, midtown NYC

Wednesday 27 September, 6-9pm: Mental Health Innovations 2017. The rising need for and increased scarcity of mental health care calls for new approaches in technology and innovation. The usual lively panel of speakers, company presenters, and engaged audience. More information on their Meetup page here. (more…)

‘We carry on’ this Memorial Day

As our Readers and Editors make our getaways for this holiday weekend (on Monday, in the UK the Spring Bank Holiday, in the US Memorial Day), it cannot help be on our minds the terrorist bombing this week killing concertgoers in Manchester and the extreme likelihood of further terror attacks. NHS trauma centers are already on highest alert specifically for this weekend, and there are reports that there may be another or even more devices in the hands of terrorists, ready for further slaughter, based on the remains of the home bomb factory. Here in New York, it is also Fleet Week, where many of our Navy’s and Coast Guard’s ships, along with sailors and Marines, visit the city. There are multiple, well-publicized events all over the metropolitan area. Evidence of increased security is everywhere.

On this US Memorial Day, where we remember and honor our fallen soldiers, sailors, airmen, Marines, Coast Guard, Merchant Marine and civilians in military service, we also include in our thoughts and prayers the innocent Manchester children and adults killed for simply enjoying themselves at a concert. We also remember that there are 18 adults and 14 children still in hospital, and that NHS emergency and trauma staff, under extreme pressure, performed magnificently.

Hundreds, perhaps thousands, of lives are forever changed. What really hits the heart, more so than at Bataclan, are that most of the dead and survivors, are children and adults waiting to take them home. Innocent lives snapped out in a few seconds. Holes in the heart that will never close.

What also hit the heart was Roy Lilley’s Friday newsletter, which says it better and more than this Editor can express. We carry on because we have to, until we can do better. We are pleased to link to it here.

TSA chair selection critiqued

Today’s Must Read  Published today in Roy Lilley’s influential NHSManagers.net newsletter (by free subscription, click on link) is Paul Harper’s commentary on the appointment of TSA Chair Andrew Gardner. Mr Harper’s view is informed by considerable experience in the UK health services concentrating on telehealth and telemedicine. His key point is that an ‘independent chair’ should be exactly that. Moreover, standards of public governance should apply (the Nolan Principles of Public Life), as these private companies are largely doing public sector business. Your Editor will let Mr Harper state the rest; a PDF of his article is attached.

In the US, where your Editor is from, it is commonplace to have an association chair from ‘inside the industry’ whether healthcare or in other areas where I’ve worked, (more…)