TTA’s Midsummer Week 5: Hackermania runs wild on double summer time, LIVI expands to 1.8 M in UK, Allscripts deals with DOJ, and GSK IMPACT opens for UK charity applications

 

 

Summer is really flying by, but the daystopper of the week is the doubling of breached patient records this year. LIVI adds a lot of patients in the UK, Allscripts settles with DOJ on compliance, and GSK IMPACT opens for UK charitable organization applications.

The Breach Barometer hits a new high for healthcare–and the year isn’t over (The geometric increase in breaches and exposed records)
LIVI telemedicine app expands availability to 1.85 million patients with GPs in Birmingham, Shropshire, Northamptonshire, Southeast (The crowded UK telemedicine field)
Allscripts reaches deal with DOJ on Practice Fusion in compliance settlement for $145 million (Bargains are never bargains)
2020 GSK IMPACT/The King’s Fund Awards now open for applications (UK) (Apply soon!)

Summer is flying by, but rural health connectivity advances at the FCC. Smartphones now set up to detect viruses. Another smartphone enabled ultrasound player–but this time in 3D. A study connects health tech to retaining LTC workers. Connected Health Summit coming up, and Vivify Health acquires a new VP.

Comings and goings, short takes, and in other news…: Vivify’s new SVP Sales, Parks’ Connected Health Summit, $35M for 3D portable ultrasound, Oxford Medical Sim new pilot (Events, products, and more)
Technology will help ease, but not replace, rising workforce demand in long-term care: UCSF study (It’s almost all about the workers and retaining them in the face of technology)
Can a smartphone camera, app, and device detect viruses at low cost? (A University of Tokyo team says yes)
FCC reforming Rural Health Care Program to improve telehealth funding in addition to Connected Care Pilot (US) (About time, but still underfunded)

A news-filled week with events, executive moves at Verily, Teladoc, and ATA, a challenging take on oral health, a dim view on AI, mall ‘medtail’, CVS’ SDH initiative, and Call9’s fan dance.

Comings and goings, short takes and upcoming events: MedStartr Wed night, Mad*Pow acquired, Teladoc’s new COO, JAMA ponders telepharmacy, NHS London anxiety apps partner (updated)
Oral health: more than a public health challenge, an opportunity for telehealth? (Two Lancet articles make the case)
News roundup: docs dim on AI without purpose, ‘medtail’ a mall trend, CVS goes SDH, Kvedar to ATA, Biden ‘moonshot’ shorts out, and Short Takes
Call9: we’ll be back — with a different model! (Not forthcoming to Crain’s on what it looks like, though)

Rock Health assesses the first half 2019 funding picture and is reassured at the pressure that investors have to exit–but we see other and somewhat cautionary things. And the hearings on the CVS-Aetna merger slump towards an exhausting close in Judge Leon’s court.

Health tech bubble watch: Rock Health’s mid-2019 funding assessment amid Big IPOs (Why the funding picture is far more interesting than Rock Health thinks)
The CVS-Aetna merger hearing draws to a dreary, weary close (But when?)

A just-published UK survey of the care tech landscape has implications in the worldwide trend of community-based wellness and disease prevention. CVS-Aetna goes another round in Judge Leon’s court, this time with five states; he should Ask Alexa as NHS patients in the UK shortly will. And did you attend DHACA’s most recent meeting on the 17th?

Care Technology Landscape Review: Socitm Advisory for Essex County Council (UK) (A UK study which has international resonance)
‘Ask Alexa’ if you’re sick, says the NHS (But what if Alexa no comprende?)
Another round this Wednesday in the CVS-Aetna merger hearings (We’ll see what happens next in the longest post-merger hearing in healthcare history)
Come and listen to Julian Hitchcock talking regulation next Wednesday 17th July! (It’s past, but keep in touch with DHACA)

A sanguine look at CVS-Aetna’s possible merger denial indicates it may not be all bad. EHRs in the news as another cause of doctor burnout, and Malaysia’s $360M implementation plan. GreatCall’s lawsuit on its mobile PERS–and how not to approach an Editor on said subject. 

A measured look at the uncertainty around the CVS-Aetna merger (A numbers-backed perspective that says an un-merger may not be all bad)
Malaysia to spend over $360M for EHRs over the next five years (Only a few markets left for EHRs in Asia)
EHR system-generated emails/inbasket messages contributing to burnout in 36% of doctors: study (And EHRs were going to fix 21st Century Medicine)
The GreatCall Lively Mobile Plus Federal District Court lawsuit–and TTA (A few thoughts about Doing Right and The Right Approach–and we note that Scott Barnes has withdrawn himself from the class action lawsuit)


Have a job to fill? Seeking a position? Free listings available to match our Readers with the right opportunities. Email Editor Donna.


Read Telehealth and Telecare Aware: http://telecareaware.com/  @telecareaware

Follow our pages on LinkedIn and on Facebook

We thank our present and past advertisers and supporters: Tynetec, Eldercare, UK Telehealthcare, NYeC, PCHAlliance, ATA, The King’s Fund, DHACA, HIMSS, Health 2.0 NYC, MedStartr, Parks Associates, and HealthIMPACT.

Reach international leaders in health tech by advertising your company or event/conference in TTA–contact Donna for more information on how we help and who we reach. See our advert information here. 


Telehealth & Telecare Aware: covering the news on latest developments in telecare, telehealth, telemedicine and health tech, worldwide–thoughtfully and from the view of fellow professionals

Thanks for asking for update emails. Please tell your colleagues about this news service and, if you have relevant information to share with the rest of the world, please let me know.

Donna Cusano, Editor In Chief
donna.cusano@telecareaware.com

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TTA’s Midsummer Week 4: FCC revamps rural health connectivity, a 3D ultrasound smartphone, mobile virus detection, retaining LTC workers through tech

 

Summer is flying by, but rural health connectivity advances at the FCC. Smartphones now set up to detect viruses. Another smartphone-enabled ultrasound player–but this time in 3D. A study connects health tech to retaining LTC workers. Connected Health Summit coming up, and Vivify Health acquires a new VP.

Comings and goings, short takes, and in other news…: Vivify’s new SVP Sales, Parks’ Connected Health Summit, $35M for 3D portable ultrasound, Oxford Medical Sim new pilot (Events, products, and more)
Technology will help ease, but not replace, rising workforce demand in long-term care: UCSF study (It’s almost all about the workers and retaining them in the face of technology)
Can a smartphone camera, app, and device detect viruses at low cost? (A University of Tokyo team says yes)
FCC reforming Rural Health Care Program to improve telehealth funding in addition to Connected Care Pilot (US) (About time, but still underfunded)

A news-filled week with events, executive moves at Verily, Teladoc, and ATA, a challenging take on oral health, a dim view on AI, mall ‘medtail’, CVS’ SDH initiative, and Call9’s fan dance.

Comings and goings, short takes and upcoming events: MedStartr Wed night, Mad*Pow acquired, Teladoc’s new COO, JAMA ponders telepharmacy, NHS London anxiety apps partner (updated)
Oral health: more than a public health challenge, an opportunity for telehealth? (Two Lancet articles make the case)
News roundup: docs dim on AI without purpose, ‘medtail’ a mall trend, CVS goes SDH, Kvedar to ATA, Biden ‘moonshot’ shorts out, and Short Takes
Call9: we’ll be back — with a different model! (Not forthcoming to Crain’s on what it looks like, though)

Rock Health assesses the first half 2019 funding picture and is reassured at the pressure that investors have to exit–but we see other and somewhat cautionary things. And the hearings on the CVS-Aetna merger slump towards an exhausting close in Judge Leon’s court.

Health tech bubble watch: Rock Health’s mid-2019 funding assessment amid Big IPOs (Why the funding picture is far more interesting than Rock Health thinks)
The CVS-Aetna merger hearing draws to a dreary, weary close (But when?)

A just-published UK survey of the care tech landscape has implications in the worldwide trend of community-based wellness and disease prevention. CVS-Aetna goes another round in Judge Leon’s court, this time with five states; he should Ask Alexa as NHS patients in the UK shortly will. And did you attend DHACA’s most recent meeting on the 17th?

Care Technology Landscape Review: Socitm Advisory for Essex County Council (UK) (A UK study which has international resonance)
‘Ask Alexa’ if you’re sick, says the NHS (But what if Alexa no comprende?)
Another round this Wednesday in the CVS-Aetna merger hearings (We’ll see what happens next in the longest post-merger hearing in healthcare history)
Come and listen to Julian Hitchcock talking regulation next Wednesday 17th July! (It’s past, but keep in touch with DHACA)

A sanguine look at CVS-Aetna’s possible merger denial indicates it may not be all bad. EHRs in the news as another cause of doctor burnout, and Malaysia’s $360M implementation plan. GreatCall’s lawsuit on its mobile PERS–and how not to approach an Editor on said subject. 

A measured look at the uncertainty around the CVS-Aetna merger (A numbers-backed perspective that says an un-merger may not be all bad)
Malaysia to spend over $360M for EHRs over the next five years (Only a few markets left for EHRs in Asia)
EHR system-generated emails/inbasket messages contributing to burnout in 36% of doctors: study (And EHRs were going to fix 21st Century Medicine)
The GreatCall Lively Mobile Plus Federal District Court lawsuit–and TTA (A few thoughts about Doing Right and The Right Approach–and we note that Scott Barnes has withdrawn himself from the class action lawsuit)

The first formal week of summer brings good news for several companies from startups to ‘teenagers’, Best Buy, and vets at suicide risk–and not good news with the shuttering of a recently profiled company and HIMSS’ “strategic” Cleveland exit. 

News roundup: Phreesia’s IPO, Chiptech enters UK telecare market, PatientsLikeMe goes to UHP, Medopad-Tencent UK Parkinson’s pilot, Oxford VR goes to HK, Cigna Singapore’s telehealth intro, HIMSS exiting Cleveland
VA’s REACH Vet uses algorithms and AI to predict critical mental health needs–including suicide risk (Reducing veteran suicide)
SNF emergency telehealth provider Call9 shuts down most operations, after $34M raise (updated) (Sad news, and the dark side of the bubble)
Best Buy enlarges health tech footprint with Tyto Care expansion, connected fitness products (updated) (Best Buy’s multiple digital health efforts keep growing)


Have a job to fill? Seeking a position? Free listings available to match our Readers with the right opportunities. Email Editor Donna.


Read Telehealth and Telecare Aware: http://telecareaware.com/  @telecareaware

Follow our pages on LinkedIn and on Facebook

We thank our present and past advertisers and supporters: Tynetec, Eldercare, UK Telehealthcare, NYeC, PCHAlliance, ATA, The King’s Fund, DHACA, HIMSS, Health 2.0 NYC, MedStartr, Parks Associates, and HealthIMPACT.

Reach international leaders in health tech by advertising your company or event/conference in TTA–contact Donna for more information on how we help and who we reach. See our advert information here. 


Telehealth & Telecare Aware: covering the news on latest developments in telecare, telehealth, telemedicine and health tech, worldwide–thoughtfully and from the view of fellow professionals

Thanks for asking for update emails. Please tell your colleagues about this news service and, if you have relevant information to share with the rest of the world, please let me know.

Donna Cusano, Editor In Chief
donna.cusano@telecareaware.com

– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

Technology will help ease, but not replace, rising workforce demand in long-term care: UCSF study

A just-published research paper by researchers at the University of California, San Francisco Health Workforce Research Center on Long-Term Care, has come to the not entirely unsurprising conclusion that the current technology targeted to the LTC area is helpful but won’t displace any workers from their jobs in the immediate future. The qualitative study evaluated 13 current health tech technologies in 14 areas for their potential impact on the care of older persons as it affects LTC workforce recruitment, training, and retention. 

Some key findings were: 

  • Technology will not even come close to replacing the LTC workforce. At most it will aid LTC workers.
  • Tools such as data collection and remote patient monitoring systems that distribute data to the care team can improve staff’s understanding of client behavior and manage day-to-day tasks
  • Technology can also address workforce recruitment, retention, and staffing efficiency, such as predictive analytics used in identifying candidate suitability, improved staff management in shift scheduling, work location, and clientele, and real time location tracking, can improve the work environment
  • Technologies that monitor health and activity measurements, integrating with predictive modeling, can benefit clients, family caregivers, and care teams, but may suffer from complexity and duplication in their category. 
  • Educational tools also improve care delivery by instructing on proper caregiving techniques, increasing knowledge on medical or behavioral conditions, and by promoting sympathy/empathy

Some of the barriers included:

  • It comes at a cost which LTC is reluctant to pay
    • Initial and ongoing cost with lack of third-party Medicare/private reimbursement
    • Dependence on unattractive long term subscription-based models 
  • Threats to privacy and the security of health data
  • Potential differences in product specificity or acceptance among diverse racial and ethnic groups
  • Technology lacking user-centered design and not developed/tested in conjunction with real-world LTC 
  • Funding: only two US VCs fund LTC tech is a bit of an exaggeration, but the pool of interest is shallow nonetheless

The overall conclusion struck this Editor as less than enthusiastic, perhaps because We’re Not There Yet and it’s still so far away.

The appendix lists the 13 companies surveyed with summaries of each health tech company interviewed: Alma’s House (Sweden), Arena (staffing/recruitment), Canary Health (education/caregiver education), CarePredict (wearables/alert monitoring), Clear Care (management). Embodied Labs (education), Intuition Robotics (ElliQ), GrandCare (monitoring/client engagement), Honor (staffing), La
Valeriane (documentation), LifePod (voicetech/monitoring), UnaliWear (wearables/monitoring), VisibleHand (documentation/EHR).

The study was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).com. UCSF summaryThe Impact of Emerging Technologies on Long-Term Care & the Health Workforce (full text)  Hat tip to Laura Mitchell of GrandCare via Twitter

AI good, AI bad (part 2): the Facebook bot dialect scare

[grow_thumb image=”http://telecareaware.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/ghosty.jpg” thumb_width=”175″ /]Eeek! Scary! Bots develop their own argot. Facebook AI Research (FAIR) tested two chatbots programmed to negotiate. In short order, they developed “their own creepy language”, in the words of the Telegraph, to trade their virtual balls, hats, and books. “Creepy” to FAIR was only a repetitive ‘divergence from English’ since the chatbots weren’t limited to standard English. The lack of restriction enabled them to develop their own argot to quickly negotiate those trades. “Agents will drift off understandable language and invent codewords for themselves,” said Dhruv Batra, visiting research scientist from Georgia Tech at Facebook AI Research. “This isn’t so different from the way communities of humans create shorthands.” like soldiers, stock traders, the slanguage of showbiz mag Variety, or teenagers. Because Facebook’s interest is in AI bot-to-human conversation, FAIR put in the requirement that the chatbots use standard English, which as it turns out is a handful for bots.

The danger in AI-to-AI divergence in language is that humans don’t have a translator for it yet, so we’d never quite understand what they are saying. Batra’s unsettling conclusion: “It’s perfectly possible for a special token to mean a very complicated thought. The reason why humans have this idea of decomposition, breaking ideas into simpler concepts, it’s because we have a limit to cognition.” So this shorthand can look like longhand? FastCompany/Co.Design’s Mark Wilson sees the upside–that software talking their own language to each other could eliminate complex APIs–application program interfaces, which enable different types of software to communicate–by letting the software figure it out. But for humans not being able to dig in and understand it readily? Something to think about as we use more and more AI in healthcare and predictive analytics.

ATA trend #2: is this the ‘second generation’ of remote patient monitoring?

Guest columnist Dr Vikrum (Sunny) Malhotra attended ATA 2015 last week. This is the second of three articles on his observations on trends and companies to watch.

During the course of the ATA conference, I was inundated with the concept of “dumb” data whereby biosensors track patient clinical data and will alarm to clinical staff if outside designated parameters. However, the call center filter between the patient’s data and physician is often a primary cause of increased unnecessary admissions. The Sentrian Remote Patient Intelligence Platform (Sentrian RPI) received recognition for its advancement in utilization of sensors, enabling healthcare providers to utilize this “dumb” data and make it “smart”. For clinicians like myself, this was a new way of looking at an age old problem: “How do we safely and comprehensively support physician decision making at a standard high enough to detect pathologies earlier and more accurately?”

Sentrian has used machine learning to support the work of a dedicated clinical team by monitoring patient data 24/7 to detect subtle signs that warn a family member or care provider of future problems through biometric patterns of thousands of patients, comparing their medical histories, vitals and health information. This novel approach to remote monitoring won Sentrian the ATA President’s Innovation Award. (more…)

NYeC Digital Health: two diverging visions of a connected future (Part 1)

The New York eHealth Collaborative’s fourth annual Digital Health Conference is increasingly notable for combining both local concerns (NYeC is one of the key coordinators of health IT for the state) and nationally significant content. A major focus of the individual sessions was data in all flavors: big, international, private, shared and ethically used. Another was using this data in coordinating care and empowering patients. Your Editor will focus on this as reflected in sessions she attended, along with thoughts by our two guest contributors, in Part 2 of this roundup.

[grow_thumb image=”http://telecareaware.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/Topol-Compressed.jpg” thumb_width=”150″ /]The NYeC Conference was unique in presenting two divergent views of ‘Future IT’ and how it will affect healthcare delivery. One is a heady, optimistic one of powerful patients taking control of their healthcare, personalized ‘democratized medicine” and innovative, genetically-powered ‘on demand medicine’. The other is a future of top-down, regulated, cost-controlled, analyzed and constrained healthcare from top to bottom, with emphasis on standardizing procedures for doctors and hospitals, plus patient compliance.

 

[grow_thumb image=”http://telecareaware.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/Topol-tech-adoption-compressed.jpg” thumb_width=”150″ /]First to Dr Topol in Monday’s keynote. The good side of people ‘wired’ to their phones is that it is symptomatic, not of Short Attention Span Theatre, but of Moore’s Law–the time technology is now taking for adoption by at least 25 percent of the US population is declining by about 50 percent. That means comfort with the eight drivers he itemizes for democratizing medicine and empowering the patient: sensors, labs, imaging, physical examination, records, costs, meds and ‘Uber Doc’.

(more…)