TTA’s Holiday Runup 2: Outcome Health exec pleads guilty, Proteus runs out of road, malware-ridden 2020 forecast, HHS execs fight, Leeds leads, DOJ looks at Fitbit, more

 

 

Barely two weeks to Christmas, but a blue one for Proteus Digital Health employees and six former Outcome Health execs. HHS leadership mixes it up in public, malware bites Hackensack, but it’s lovely in Leeds–and if you have a new job.

News roundup: Proteus may be no-teous, DOJ leads on Google-Fitbit, HHS’ mud fight, Leeds leading in health tech, malware miseries, comings and goings (Proteus runs out of road for 300, DOJ looking at Fitbit acquisition, HHS execs no lika each other, malware 2020, and it’s Leeds leading)
“There were practices going on there that were wrong”: Outcome Health’s Desai pleads guilty, cooperates with DOJ. (One pleads guilty, three not guilty, with the major players pleading on Monday)

Snow falls, what’s left of freeze-dried leaves clog the gutters, and we’re revving up the charge cards in our run up to the Christmas holidays. Dr. Halamka follows the AI Star to Mayo. But already there’s coal in the stocking for six former Outcome Health-ers.

News roundup: Philips allies with Humana for pop health, Dexcom’s outage outrage, Halamka ankles Lahey for Mayo, Google and NHS Wales changes, Agfa’s health sale, Victrix/WhatsApp, more

SEC, DOJ charges Outcome Health founders Shah and Agarwal, others, with $487 million fraud, 26 counts of indictment (Club Fed looms for decades)

BRRR! Winter’s preview has hit the US East Coast. Walgreens Boots Alliance and Google’s Project Nightingale may be feeling the chill. And NHS tries to find a workaround for app vetting.

Walgreens Boots going private in the largest ever leveraged buyout: reports (Maybe too big for the market?)
Google’s ‘Project Nightingale’–a de facto breach of 10 million health records, on a bridge too far? (Is there no end to Google intrusion?)
A change of vetting for the NHS Apps Library by spring 2020 (Outsourcing the accreditation problem)

Leaves are turning–and falling–as fall gets on. Getting on, many face the care gap that happens after a hospital discharge. Teladoc looks healthier, but Walgreens is rethinking its clinic strategy. Outcome Health avoids a reckoning with the DOJ. 

Short takes: Outcome Health pays up, Teladoc’s up in double-digits, Walgreens closing 40% of clinics, a health kiosk for hospital employees?
The biggest care gap: the fear of going home after discharge (What do you do–when you can’t do for yourself? The British Red Cross is applying some answers.)

Autumn’s more pleasant this week. As leaves fall, questions on age tech rise. Dissatisfaction with healthcare continues despite digital health’s rise. Cleveland Clinic’s telehealth tieup with American Well, Amazon’s buy of Health Navigator, and more. And get away to a digital health conference in historic Trondheim.

Short Takes: Amazon buys symptom checker Health Navigator; Ettain Group acquires EHR consultant Leidos Health (Amazon’s new foray into Amazon Care)
Is ‘age-tech’ a stereotype that misses the larger mark–and market? (A pernicious belief that helps no one)
Over half of Americans of all ages use digital health tools, self-diagnose after internet search: ResMed/Edelman survey (High levels of dissatisfaction with healthcare despite digital tools)
Cleveland Clinic, American Well extend partnership to high-acuity telehealth services with ‘The Clinic’ (Health system growth pinned to telehealth–and virtual visits specializing in complex conditions)
Tyto Care partners with Avera eCARE for telehealth delivered to medically underserved populations (Tyto Care obviously building a use case)
Call for abstracts extended: ISG’s 12th World Conference of Gerontechnology (Norway) (A chance to visit Trondheim)

Autumn’s rainy days set the stage for much M&A, departures, and company moves from Appello, NHS Digital, Babylon Health, Verita, Tyto Care, and more. And slow gait=fast aging in Duke University five-decade study. 

News, moves and M&A roundup: Appello acquires RedAssure, Shaw departs NHS Digital, NHS App goes biometric, GP at Hand in Manchester, Verita Singapore’s three startup buys, Novant Health and Tyto Care partner
Slow gait speed at age 45 as an accelerated aging predictor–and result: Duke University study (A Must-Read if you are interested in aging and its causes)


Have a job to fill? Seeking a position? Free listings available to match our Readers with the right opportunities. Email Editor Donna.


Read Telehealth and Telecare Aware: http://telecareaware.com/  @telecareaware

Follow our pages on LinkedIn and on Facebook

We thank our present and past advertisers and supporters: Tynetec, Eldercare, UK Telehealthcare, NYeC, PCHAlliance, ATA, The King’s Fund, DHACA, HIMSS, Health 2.0 NYC, MedStartr, Parks Associates, and HealthIMPACT.

Reach international leaders in health tech by advertising your company or event/conference in TTA–contact Donna for more information on how we help and who we reach. See our advert information here. 


Telehealth & Telecare Aware: covering the news on latest developments in telecare, telehealth, telemedicine and health tech, worldwide–thoughtfully and from the view of fellow professionals

Thanks for asking for update emails. Please tell your colleagues about this news service and, if you have relevant information to share with the rest of the world, please let me know.

Donna Cusano, Editor In Chief
donna.cusano@telecareaware.com

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TTA’s Holiday Runup 1: Halamka follows the AI Star to Mayo. Changes at Google and NHS Wales Informatics. Dexcom’s outrageous outage. 26 counts and counting for Outcome Health.

 

Snow falls, what’s left of freeze-dried leaves clog the gutters, and we’re revving up the charge cards in our run up to the Christmas holidays. Dr. Halamka follows the AI Star to Mayo. But already there’s coal in the stocking for six former Outcome Health-ers.

News roundup: Philips allies with Humana for pop health, Dexcom’s outage outrage, Halamka ankles Lahey for Mayo, Google and NHS Wales changes, Agfa’s health sale, Victrix/WhatsApp, more

SEC, DOJ charges Outcome Health founders Shah and Agarwal, others, with $487 million fraud, 26 counts of indictment (Club Fed looms for decades)

BRRR! Winter’s preview has hit the US East Coast. Walgreens Boots Alliance and Google’s Project Nightingale may be feeling the chill. And NHS tries to find a workaround for app vetting.

Walgreens Boots going private in the largest ever leveraged buyout: reports (Maybe too big for the market?)
Google’s ‘Project Nightingale’–a de facto breach of 10 million health records, on a bridge too far? (Is there no end to Google intrusion?)
A change of vetting for the NHS Apps Library by spring 2020 (Outsourcing the accreditation problem)

Leaves are turning–and falling–as fall gets on. Getting on, many face the care gap that happens after a hospital discharge. Teladoc looks healthier, but Walgreens is rethinking its clinic strategy. Outcome Health avoids a reckoning with the DOJ. 

Short takes: Outcome Health pays up, Teladoc’s up in double-digits, Walgreens closing 40% of clinics, a health kiosk for hospital employees?
The biggest care gap: the fear of going home after discharge (What do you do–when you can’t do for yourself? The British Red Cross is applying some answers.)

 

Autumn’s more pleasant this week. As leaves fall, questions on age tech rise. Dissatisfaction with healthcare continues despite digital health’s rise. Cleveland Clinic’s telehealth tieup with American Well, Amazon’s buy of Health Navigator, and more. And get away to a digital health conference in historic Trondheim.

Short Takes: Amazon buys symptom checker Health Navigator; Ettain Group acquires EHR consultant Leidos Health (Amazon’s new foray into Amazon Care)
Is ‘age-tech’ a stereotype that misses the larger mark–and market? (A pernicious belief that helps no one)
Over half of Americans of all ages use digital health tools, self-diagnose after internet search: ResMed/Edelman survey (High levels of dissatisfaction with healthcare despite digital tools)
Cleveland Clinic, American Well extend partnership to high-acuity telehealth services with ‘The Clinic’ (Health system growth pinned to telehealth–and virtual visits specializing in complex conditions)
Tyto Care partners with Avera eCARE for telehealth delivered to medically underserved populations (Tyto Care obviously building a use case)
Call for abstracts extended: ISG’s 12th World Conference of Gerontechnology (Norway) (A chance to visit Trondheim)

Autumn’s rainy days set the stage for much M&A, departures, and company moves from Appello, NHS Digital, Babylon Health, Verita, Tyto Care, and more. And slow gait=fast aging in Duke University five-decade study. 

News, moves and M&A roundup: Appello acquires RedAssure, Shaw departs NHS Digital, NHS App goes biometric, GP at Hand in Manchester, Verita Singapore’s three startup buys, Novant Health and Tyto Care partner
Slow gait speed at age 45 as an accelerated aging predictor–and result: Duke University study (A Must-Read if you are interested in aging and its causes)


Have a job to fill? Seeking a position? Free listings available to match our Readers with the right opportunities. Email Editor Donna.


Read Telehealth and Telecare Aware: http://telecareaware.com/  @telecareaware

Follow our pages on LinkedIn and on Facebook

We thank our present and past advertisers and supporters: Tynetec, Eldercare, UK Telehealthcare, NYeC, PCHAlliance, ATA, The King’s Fund, DHACA, HIMSS, Health 2.0 NYC, MedStartr, Parks Associates, and HealthIMPACT.

Reach international leaders in health tech by advertising your company or event/conference in TTA–contact Donna for more information on how we help and who we reach. See our advert information here. 


Telehealth & Telecare Aware: covering the news on latest developments in telecare, telehealth, telemedicine and health tech, worldwide–thoughtfully and from the view of fellow professionals

Thanks for asking for update emails. Please tell your colleagues about this news service and, if you have relevant information to share with the rest of the world, please let me know.

Donna Cusano, Editor In Chief
donna.cusano@telecareaware.com

– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

News roundup: Philips allies with Humana for pop health, Dexcom’s outage outrage, Halamka ankles Lahey for Mayo, Google and NHS Wales changes, Agfa’s health sale, Victrix/WhatsApp, more

Insurer Humana is identifying high-acuity and chronic CHF Medicare Advantage members and deploying two support programs utilizing Philips PERS and remote patient monitoring (RPM) systems. The first program identifies at-risk older people with chronic conditions and offering them Philips Lifeline with AutoAlert, Lifeline’s fall detection technology, and their CareSage predictive analytics. Philips Lifeline is already offered in select Humana Medicare Advantage plans. The second is a pilot with telehealth RPM to monitor a select group of CHF patients. This will use a Philips interactive tablet and connected measurement devices for care teams to actively monitor congestive heart failure patients. The rationale in the press release is centered on population health management, quality of care, and positively influencing patient outcomes, with “more efficient resource utilization” a/k/a lowering cost of care. Philips release.

Health tech is great, when it works–and Dexcom found out how serious it can get when it doesn’t. Dexcom, a continuous glucose monitoring system, experienced a server outage over the US Thanksgiving holiday weekend into Monday. It knocked out its updates in the Follow feature, frequently used by parents to monitor Type 1 diabetic children, and those with artificial pancreas devices that adjust insulin based on monitored BG levels. Dexcom was not only blasted by users on the server outage, which they attributed to ‘overload’, but also on its communications of the problem to users which depended on Facebook postings and not on real-time direct contacts or messaging. It was a ‘big surprise’ to their CEO, who also dismissed the possibility of a data breach, which seems a bit premature. Both Google and Microsoft provide cloud and tech services to Dexcom. CNBC 12/2, 12/3

Comings and goings: HIT pioneer, strategist, and general guru John Halamka is following the AI Star, leaving Boston’s Beth Israel Lahey Health to head up a machine learning/AI initiative at the Mayo Clinic in Minneapolis. Mayo this fall announced a 10-year high-level partnership with Google Cloud to store patient data and analysis. Modern Healthcare  According to the Healthcare IT News article, he’ll be returning on weekends to the Bay State to his 250-acre working farm….Also moving on to Google Health is Facebook’s Hema Budaraju, a product management director. Business Insider has annoyingly hid the news behind its paywall, leading to speculation in Mobihealthnews that she will be engaged in Google’s “social and environmental impact” efforts as she was at FB…And speaking of Google, founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin are stepping down at long last from active management. Google CEO Sundar Pichai will now be running Google and its corporate parent, Alphabet. See their letter on the GoogleBlog.DigitalHealth reports on changes at the NHS Wales Informatics Service. Helen Thomas is now interim director as NWIS director Andrew Griffiths is departing this month. NWIS is also transitioning to a new Special Health Authority….Agfa’s Healthcare Information Solutions and Integrated Care, plus their imaging division, are definitely going to Italy’s Dedalus Holdings S.p.A. for €975 million. It awaits approval from various authorities, their employee groups, and the usual closing conditions. Release, DigitalHealth.

UK healthcare analytics company Victrix Socsan has signed a licensing agreement last month with WhatsApp. Victrix will use Whats App for communications with beneficiaries as part of their furnishing proactive preventive care services and provide secure information. Release.

Another Tunstall Americas distributor acquisition

[grow_thumb image=”http://telecareaware.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/Big-T-thumb-480×294-55535.gif” thumb_width=”150″ /]Another press release from Tunstall Healthcare Group is also about Tunstall Americas, in this case the acquisition of Syracuse NY (Central NY State)-based Health Care Monitoring Systems (HMS). This continues this year’s strategy of purchasing or partnering with local home care providers. Like Mountain Home and Kupuna Monitoring (previously in TTA), HMS’ website prominently features a competitor–Philips Lifeline. Notable in the spare release is that the HMS founder notes “strong relationships with referral partners and government agencies.”  Release

The traditional PERS as ‘ancient history’

[grow_thumb image=”http://telecareaware.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/Fallen-woman.jpg” thumb_width=”150″ /]Something to think about. How many families and older adults are aware that the traditional PERS emergency pendant, which has been around for at least 40 years, is sadly outdated and in fact inadequate for those at greatest risk? While major advertisers on US media such as Life Alert, Life Call, ADT and Philips Lifeline present crisis situations where the older person is on the floor and is rescued after pressing the pendant button, they barely advertise their other available products that incorporate passive fall detection and cellular, even if somewhat inadequate for soft falls or unconsciousness. Families unwisely feel ‘protected’ when paying for traditional PERS, not realizing that more advanced technology is readily available and not that much more expensive. Moreover, and only mentioned in the context of his grandmother’s fall while in senior housing, there is a distinct recalcitrance of senior housing executives to rid their apartments of the (cheap) old pendants and replace them with (pricier) passive/cellular assistance systems, much less more advanced wearables/RFID systems or mobile/watch combinations. This Editor also notes that the major drugstore chains also sell PERS; while they trumpet wellness in their advertising, they are as behind the curve in this area as senior housing. Neil Versel in MedCityNews.

For our Readers: can we compare/contrast how the UK, EU and US are still wedded to traditional PERS after 40 years, and if more advanced forms are starting to take hold? Click on the headline to see comments, including this Editor’s opining on traditional PERS as ‘cash cow’.

Accelerometers, false positives/negatives and fall detection

Tom Doris, KeepUs project founder and technical lead, responds to our recent post [TTA 28 Aug] critiquing Philips Lifeline with AutoAlert’s accelerometer and its possible failure to detect a fall which resulted in the death of a Massachusetts woman. His analysis concludes that accelerometers on their own are surprisingly inaccurate. The false positives/negatives may be minimal but they do exist, and they should not be the only indicator of a fall.

Mr Doris has a PhD in computer science and was formerly an R&D engineer at Intel. Earlier in TTA: 4 Oct 13, 22 July

Falling Down is a Surprisingly Hard Problem

More than 250,000 people suffer a hip fracture in the US every year. More than 20 percent will die within 12 months as a consequence of their fall. One in three who lived independently before the fracture will need at least a year of rehabilitation in a nursing home. While rehabilitation methods are improving, the single most important factor influencing the long-term outcome is the length of time between the fall and getting medical attention at a hospital. A few hours more or less makes the difference between life and death.

People are living longer, and current projections make it clear that elderly people will have to live independently in their own homes for as long as possible. You just can’t provide residential care for 20 percent of the population. Smartphones and wearable technology have the potential to dramatically improve eldercare. A relatively cheap smartphone can track activity and location. Modern platforms analyze the data in real-time over the internet and can, in theory, immediately spot when something is wrong and raise an alert.

The theory doesn’t always work however. (more…)

Philips Lifeline introduces a mPERS app

[grow_thumb image=”http://telecareaware.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/philips-lifeline-app.jpg” thumb_width=”120″ /]Philips Lifeline has debuted in the US an unbranded mPERS-like app which allows the user from a smartphone (iPhone/Android only) to access the Philips Lifeline call center. The app is free but the service to voice connect to their call center, according to their customer center, is a (bargain compared to standard PERS) $13.95. The phone’s GPS geo-locates the person in need. The fact that the introduction is in the ‘dog days of August’ is one indicator that they are readying well ahead of the late fall (autumn) bump in demand. (Both this Editor and Mobihealthnews see a back and fill for the much-touted GoSafe introduction which 18 months later is still not in market.)

But walk with your Editor through this scenario:

  • Smartphone-equipped older person takes a fall, has an accident or is a crime victim
  • Despite the fact that all smartphones have accelerometers, the app does not tie in to this data, (more…)