When disruptive healthcare tech disrupts the wrong things, including safety

[grow_thumb image=”http://telecareaware.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/Thomas.jpg” thumb_width=”150″ /]Last week’s Health 2.0 conference was (of course) a three-ring circus of new technology and its corollary, a lot of hype. An astute writer new to this Editor, Michael Millenson, draws together the key points of two prominent, but not hyped speakers there: Robert Wachter, MD and Michael Blum, MD, both practicing in University of California San Francisco’s (UCSF) medical center. Dr Wachter, chief of the Division of Hospital Medicine, has been profiled in these pages earlier this year in a review of an excerpt from his book, The Digital Doctor: Hope, Hype and Harm at the Dawn of Medicine’s Computer Age. There he wrote about the example of Pablo Garcia, nearly dying from over-prescribed doses of an antibiotic that a chain of errors in their EHR started. Dr Blum is Director of UCSF’s Center for Digital Health Innovation. But their points are on the same track: “the danger of disruptive technology that disrupts the wrong things: upsets checks and balances that keep patients safe, makes working conditions more stressful and simply doesn’t play well with others.” His conclusions are on the money: #1, it’s not the technology but the adaptive change that front and back line clinicians will need to make; #2, entrepreneurs with whiz-bang tech that zips data to the clinician without fitting it into a care process are doomed to fail; #3 some kind of curation is needed. But whether that will be Care Innovations’ Validation Institute or Social Wellth (which purchased the late Happtique from GNYHA) is another story. Key for Health IT Entrepreneurs: Don’t Disrupt the Wrong Thing (Forbes)

More Samsung ‘we try harder’ telehealth moves

Is Samsung playing Avis “We try harder®” to Apple’s Hertz?

Samsung’s other, less noticed end-run in addition to the Simband reference hardware and SAMI ‘open ecosystem’  is an initiative creating a joint research center with the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) called the Center for Digital Health Innovation (CDHI). It is being headed by Michael Blum, a medical doctor who is the UCSF assistant vice chancellor of informatics. From the statements made to The Atlantic, Dr Blum’s intent is to clinically validate the sensors and algorithms produced within the Samsung ecosystem. Already featured are four initial projects: CareWeb (a collaborative care platform built on Salesforce.com), Tidepool (infrastructure for diabetes apps), Health eHeart (clinical trial app on heart disease) and Trinity (‘precision team care’). On the frontier: ‘novel vital signs’ which he predicts will come out of the analysis of standard vital signs, “…new markers of health and wellness that come out of these large datasets.”  Is Samsung, rather than going head-to-head with Apple on Healthbook [TTA 22 Mar] is leapfrogging into something akin to Telehealth 2.0 or 3.0? Yet this Editor notes that we haven’t figured out, for the most part, the FBQs (Five Big Questions)* of 1.0….

* The Five Big Questions (FBQs)–who pays, how much, who’s looking at the data, who’s actioning it, how data is integrated into patient records.