A possible win for diabetics–a glucose monitoring ‘tattoo’ patch

[grow_thumb image=”http://telecareaware.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/102337982-tattooHR.530×298.jpg” thumb_width=”150″ /]A possible advance in the perpetual Battle of Stalingrad that diabetics face in their self-monitoring has been developed through research at the University of California at San Diego (UCSD)’s Center for Wearable Sensors. A flexible skin tattoo-like patch has been used to monitor pre- and post-meal blood glucose levels. It works by using a small electrical current directed to the two small electrodes in the clear patch which activate an enzyme that reacts with glucose, giving a reading to the researchers on the seven subjects which correlates to conventional needle-stick metering. It’s not so advanced yet that it delivers information to a smartphone or dedicated meter, but directionally it’s in the right direction. And think of the savings both in disposables and cost ($1 each). The Center for Wearable Sensors is further developing (more…)

The ultimate ‘comfy sensor patch’–an implant

[grow_thumb image=”http://telecareaware.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/3036175-inline-i-2-from-the-designers-of-fitbit-a-digital-tattoo.jpg” thumb_width=”175″ /]John A. Rogers and his ‘skunkworks’, take notice. From the design shop that brought you Fitbit, NewDealDesign (FDR would be puzzled), comes the next big step in wearables–a sensor patch concept which would be implanted in your hand and multi-task till the cows come home. Project Underskin would detect fitness levels, vital signs such as blood glucose or body temperature, unlock your door or pre-authorize your credit card. The curved implant (more…)

Wearables: the ‘comfy sensor patch’ changes color, a cushion nags on posture

[grow_thumb image=”http://telecareaware.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/skin_heart_monitor-1.jpg” thumb_width=”175″ /]Another sensor patch out of the John A. Rogers ‘skunk works’ at the University of Illinois-Urbana/Champaign is designed to be continually worn (presumably in a discreet–not discrete–place) and is capable of monitoring temperature and moistness on the skin’s surface, relating to cardiovascular health and skin care. This ‘epidermal photonic sensor’  has 3,600 0.5mm squared “thermochromic liquid crystals patterned into large-scale, pixelated arrays on thin elastomeric substrates” (meaning a stretchy sensor). Based on this Editor’s reading of the research abstract, color changes with temperature; algorithms and a digital camera shot of the patch then turn temperature data into decipherable health information. What’s not known is how the sensor information transmits. Gizmag, Nature Communications (abstract) Rogers’ previously developed sensors: Biostamp and Reebok Checklight TTA 28 July, the original ‘comfy sensor patch’ 10 April and 8 April.

And watch how you sit. The Darma seat cushion adds 1mm fiberoptic sensors (more…)