A gallimaufry of short digital health items to start the day with

The WHO has produced an excellent report on the state of eHealth in the European region, including a review of telehealth readiness. Ericsson have produced a very interesting report confirming what I guess anyone will have realised if they’ve traveled by public transport or have children: young people downloading video content are driving a surge in data usage: there’s much detail here though. Both are well worth the read.

Mentioning Ericsson reminds that the Telegraph recently produced a summary of the 20 best-selling mobile phones of all time – takes you back, with the substantial number once produced by Nokia.

The Royal Society of Medicine has it’s fifth annual medical app conference on April 7th – numbers booked have already well exceeded last year’s sellout so they are expecting to fill this year’s much larger conference venue. The focus this year is on the many legislative, regulatory and voluntary measures being introduced that will impact medical apps – there’s still room for old favourites though, such as Richard Brady’s always-topical (more…)

The hypealicious, hyperluxus Apple Watch debut–what the healtherati are interested in

[grow_thumb image=”http://telecareaware.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/gimlet-eye.jpg” thumb_width=”150″ /]L’œil de Gimlet eyes the Apple Watch. What’s down the road is more important than Monday’s unveil. Certainly The Eye, an adorer of all things over-the-top, would love to have the $10,000-and-up 18 karat, Daddy Warbucks, Solid Gold Cadillac edition of the Apple Watch. It is the sheer hyperluxus, Mercedes-Maybach S600-ness of it all that races my pulse. Stop at $4,000? Nein! $10,000 and up lends a golden glow to all those ordinary, plastic-banded, Mickey Mouse-faced $349 and up versions for the Applepolloi that take that pulse, burp your wrist when you’re not moving enough, open the garage door, play tunes and let you draw little thingies on the face that you can send to your friends. (Urp) What’s even better than a Merc-Maybach in Conspicuous Consumption-Ville? That it will be out of date in a year, unless Apple has a trade-in policy.

[grow_thumb image=”http://telecareaware.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/Tim-Cook-previews-the-App-008.jpg” thumb_width=”200″ /] Cue Tim Cook and the Happy Dance of the Watches. (Photo: Zuma/Rex via Guardian)

[grow_thumb image=”http://telecareaware.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/Apple-Goldfinger.jpg” thumb_width=”200″ /]Cue Shirley Bassey. (Gigaom via Twitter)

Ah, but let us get down to business and cut our swathe through the fog d’hype. (Editor Donna just walked in the door…)

As predicted and projected, the Apple Watch in stores 24 April in Australia, Canada, China, France, Germany, Hong Kong, Japan, UK and US goes light and standard on health measurement features: accelerometer, heart rate sensors, running and weekly activity reports. What’s different? Wrist burps you if you’re a lazy, sitting sod. (Not a great feature for deep meditators or napsters.) The leak from two weeks ago feinted health through downplaying the functionality of the Watch. Back in September, claims included blood pressure and stress monitoring. [TTA 18 Feb]

Now for the right cross. It’s not the Watch, it’s the ResearchKit. Apple gets serious in health apps beyond HealthKit, partnering with the stars in the medical research firmament. As reported: (more…)

Breaking news on the Apple phones & smartwatch

Breaking News from the CNet live coverage moving along in real time:

  • New iPhone 6 phones are both retina display. Phablet is 5.5″ screen (iPhone 6 Plus) and standard is 4.7″
  • Big play on NFC-driven mobile payments: Apple Pay at 220,000 locations, via 83 percent of US banks plus American Express (international?)
  • Security: Eddy Cue, senior vice president of Internet software and services–We’ve integrated security from software and hardware. We create a device only account number and put it in the Secure Element. No longer have the static code on the back of the card.
    • One time only use and claim no tracking on your purchases, no card info shared with retailer (!!!) Implications for healthcare payments?
[grow_thumb image=”http://telecareaware.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/Activity.jpg” thumb_width=”200″ /]
  • Here comes the Apple Watch (not iWatch)—CNet commentator says it’s like iPod Nano with sexy design upgrade. Health implications to follow. (more…)

Apple patents built in emergency alert for iPhone

Apple have filed a patent for a “Mobile emergency attack and failsafe detection” which uses the iPhone’s inbuilt sensors to detect a probable emergency situation, such as a physical attack against the user.  When the device is in ‘attack detection mode’, certain events can cause it to request help automatically, by calling a defined emergency contact or the emergency services. The GPS co-ordinates can also be transmitted. Apple Insider

Apple purchasing 3D gesture control developer PrimeSense

Breaking News

Based on the report you read, the deal is done or nearly done, but it is highly likely that Apple will be acquiring Tel Aviv-based PrimeSense for an amount in or around $345 million. PrimeSense developed the original 3D gesture control behind Microsoft Kinect (replaced by their in-house version); the company currently works with Asus and probably Apple. The purchase will enable Apple to add controls with body movements and hand gestures to its smartphone, tablet and TV products, as well as more closely defend its own patents in 3D gesture control lined out in Apple-ology blog 9to5Mac. Nothing in this or other reports about the Apple foray into smartwatches or wearables, but the capability fits. Watch 9to5Mac, TheNextWeb and TechCrunch for updates.

Apple’s tarnished luster predicted, interestingly

At the point where doctors and their children use iPhones routinely, iPad is the elite tablet and Apple’s balance sheet is deep in cash, University of Southern California business professor and management consultant Dave Logan is warning that the magic is waning. He uses a bit of communication analysis called ‘wordmapping’ that he’s developed to parse the remarks of Apple’s management, notably CEO Tim Cook, and concludes that Apple is losing its way. There is no longer a revolutionary-in-residence imagining something from nothing…none on the horizon, either. Apple-ologists have been tap dancing around this for awhile, but the protracted development of the Apple smartwatch is pinging all sorts of alarms, despite the flurry of activity in and around health ‘n’ fitness [TTA 20 July] We’ve been to this movie before when Blackberry was a must-have and dubbed ‘Crackberry.’ A rather cheeky headline that’s made a few AppleFans upset. Why Apple is a dead company walking (CBS MoneyWatch)

Related: Want to try wordmapping for yourself as a tool for ‘instant rapport’? Mr. Logan dishes on the fascinating pointers here.

Doctors wild about…what works

In the first half of the following blog item the author makes some valid points about doctors being quick to adopt mobile devices but that they were also quick to discover that the available apps are not much use in their work. The second half turns into a ‘knock Apple and big-up Windows 8 on tablets’ session. But then, as the author is Bill Crounse, MD, Senior Director, Worldwide Health at Microsoft, it would be surprising if he didn’t take that opportunity. Doctors wild about….. what works Hat tip to Bob Pyke.

UPDATE: related item, thanks to Toni Bunting: Health apps won’t reach core NHS patients (The Guardian). An NHS commissioner, writing under a pseudonym, also bemoans the lack of focus on appropriate apps and/or their use in the NHS. What the author focuses on is that the majority of NHS users are “the elderly, deprived and poorly-educated” and these people are less likely than most to be wielding and using smartphones.