MedStartr Momentum ’17 this Thursday–50+ speakers, 20 pitches, $2M in prizes! (NYC)

MedStartr Momentum (#MedMo17), 30 Nov-1 Dec, PwC HQ, 300 Madison Avenue (@42nd) NYC

Now that you’ve finished off the last of the Thanksgiving leftovers, leave some room for this year’s MedMo17. You’ll feast on over 50 speakers and panelists in two full days of talks, networking, and real discussion on how to improve healthcare. There will be plenty of ideas served piping hot on innovation, adoption, and investment in the future of healthcare. Highlights:

  • Nine Momentum Talks on Healthcare innovation from inspirational leaders like Deborah Estrin of Cornell Tech,  Maria Gotsch of the Partnership Fund for NYC, Jack Barrette of WEGO Health, Jay Helmer of Livongo, Stuart Hochron MD of Uniphy Health, Jim Lebret MD of NYU,  and George Mathew, MD of DXC Technologies and CarePredict.
  • Four panels with thought leaders and CEOs on healthcare innovation and investing, reviewing the hottest topics for 2018, such as blockchain, smart cities, empowered patients and digital health for the rest of us.
  • Four Grand Challenge pitch contests covering wearables/ IoT, hospital solutions, clinical innovations, pharmatech, patient connectivity, AI, precision medicine, and more. (Rumor has it that this Editor will be on one judging panel!)

Join 200 attendees who are leading the healthcare innovation drive. There’s a great team that puts this all together, with Alex Fair of MedStartr the real spark plug behind it all. Much credit is due to generous sponsors and supporters like PricewaterhouseCoopers, DataArt, SparkLabs, HealthTechTalk Live, Moses & Singer, CohnResnick, McCarter & English, Epion Health, WEGO Health, Chardan Capital Markets, NJ Innovation Institute/NJIT, and others. 

TTA has been a supporter of MedStartr/Health 2.0 NYC since early days (2010). We’ve been able to obtain this special offer for our Readers–25% off a regular $299 ticket. Use Code TTA25. It’s an unbeatable deal for two full days with lunch and coffee breaks–conferences of this type are usually three to five times more. (And if you fall into certain special categories, like student or a pre-revenue startup founder, it’s even less; though our discount isn’t available on these ‘specials’, you won’t need it.) For our UK and EU Readers, it makes it worthwhile to catch an inexpensive NY flight, attend, and get started on your holiday shopping! See the action on Twitter #MedMo17, updates on @MedStartr.

MedStartr Momentum 2017 – coming up 30 Nov!

[grow_thumb image=”http://telecareaware.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/medstartr-400×400.jpg” thumb_width=”125″ /]Momentum 2017, PricewaterhouseCoopers headquarters, 300 Madison Avenue (42nd Street), NYC, 30 Nov (8.45am-5pm)-1 Dec (9am-3pm)

MedStartr/Health 2.0 NYC Momentum is back for a third year, returning to PwC’s NYC headquarters. The format is unusual because it blends nine speakers in Momentum Talks with five pitch contests and seven panels totaling over 70 participants on stage. The subject is all about driving innovation in healthcare from the wide variety of perspectives seen by patients, doctors, partners, institutions, and investors.  Speakers, sponsors and agenda are all on the main page here.

The culmination is the award of the 2017 Grand National Challenge. Up to 25 teams will be invited to New York or the Healthcare Financial Summit 6-7 October in Las Vegas. Each winning team that enters the MedStartr Acceleration Program (MAP) will receive up to $250,000 in funding and services–and, as in all MedStartr Crowd Challenges, companies keep control of their pilots, partnerships, funds raised, investors engaged, and traction.

Registration is open–and early bird tickets are only $99. (You can’t get a better value!) More to come as we get closer to the event! TTA is a MedStartr and Health 2.0 NYC supporter/media sponsor since 2010; Editor Donna will be a host for this event and a MedStartr Mentor. Check the MedStartr page to find and fund some of the most interesting startup ideas in healthcare.

A ‘desperate’ call for healthcare innovation creates a stir

When you are trying to shake things up in healthcare, sometimes enthusiasm gets mistaken for desperation.

Alex Fair is known to many of our American Readers as one of the Grizzled Pioneers of what eventually became known as Health 2.0. He’s head of a Meetup group in NYC with close to 5,000 members (Health 2.0 NYC, for which this Editor was an event organizer/producer for over a year), founder of health innovation-only crowdfunding platform Medstartr (see ‘Websites We Like’), a successful health tech event producer (MedMomentum 16 coming up 1-2 December) and a few other things in between. In short, Alex Hustles For The Cause.

One of his projects is the Major Depressive Disorder (MDD)/Depression Care Innovation Challenge with Takeda, which closed for applications last Monday. There was a last flurry of promotion via personal notes in social media and emails which is standard–well-known in style for those of us on Alex’s lists. But sometimes enthusiasm gets misinterpreted.

So a funny thing happened to me yesterday on Twitter. Someone told us that we sounded “desperate” in our tweets and posts. At first, my lizard brain said “what, I don’t want to be seen as desperate!” as if I was trying to get a date for the Junior Prom (which I did, thank you very much.) But then my mission-driven, we-have-got-to-fix-this-NOW-so-more-people-like-Jess_Jacobs-Live-longer-and-better-lives brain fired up and said, “Damn Right I’m Desperate!” The fact is that if we want to move the needle on innovation, we need to do something about it and desperate times DO call for desperate measures.

Read all about it here. If you want to change healthcare, especially in the US, you might get a little frustrated! (P.S. Along with the controversy is a calendar of upcoming NYC health tech events).

6 helpful hints for healthcare startup founders–and funders

Investor Skip Fleshman of Palo Alto (of course)-based Asset Management Ventures has six points of sound advice for founders and developers–and funders of same–who think that their Big Idea(s) are the one thing which will revolutionize healthcare, particularly because of their personal experiences. We’ve observed that successful startups have fitted themselves into the Healthcare Establishment’s game [TTA 19 May], but if an investor is still seeing that attitude, it’s still there. AMV’s track record is there with investments in several healthcare companies, including Proteus Digital Health and HealthTap. Mr Fleshman’s points with this Editor’s comments:

1. Listen to the market–and it’s not direct-to-consumer, despite a cursory reading of Eric Topol. Find where your product or service can reduce or avoid cost, increase engagement and improve quality i.e. patient outcomes (which are all linked, see #4)
2. Hire people who know how to speak the language–experienced healthcare people who can work the system but also get the changes and want to make a difference. And no, they may not look or act like you. They’ll often have gray hair and families. Unless they are independently wealthy, they also expect to be paid decently. Quite a few will be women who don’t act or look like you either, but are invaluable in your organization in multiple ways.
3. Understand how the money flows–and the money is with providers, payers, self-insured employers and (Mr Fleshman doesn’t mention this) government (Medicare, Medicaid, the alphabet soup of HHS, CMS…). The incentives (shared savings) are now to providers to pull cost out of their system but somehow maintain population health quality and outcomes. How to pull this off is where the innovation is needed. Partner wherever you can–and this Editor would add, with other successful early-stage companies as well.
4. Read the Affordable Care Act–with a bottle of painkillers and eyedrops. (more…)