TTA Fall Follies Week 3: redux strikes again with Doro, Teladoc suing Amwell, Theranos’ non-stick wall; also Tunstall and Buddi

 

 

Mostly a ‘redux’ of a week, with Doro acquiring another company, Teladoc suing Amwell, and Theranos’ judge telling the defense that nothing they threw at the wall stuck. Tunstall reminds us that the most vulnerable are at risk during the winter–you should too. And if you are seeking a sales manager position, see our UK highlights article–Buddi is hiring.

UK highlights: Doro acquires Connexus Careline, Tunstall warns on winter isolation and disconnected care, Buddi seeks Sales Account Manager  (Doro increases its second position, and happy to see more hiring!)
Teladoc sues Amwell on patent infringement–again (This time, much larger companies go head to head, creating bountiful Christmas bonuses for their lawyers)
The Theranos Story, ch. 67: the Holmes/Balwani indictments stay, Holmes’ defense strategy fails (Waiting for the Twinkie Defense II, or the money running out)

Leaves have started to turn and fall, but digital health just keeps rising with $9.4 bn in investment this year. Tunstall UK and Group Holdings report their financial status and preview their new ownership. And la scandale Theranos continues with a revelation of defense strategy.

Digital health investment smashes the ceiling: $9.4 bn invested through 3rd Q (It’s Bubble City!)
The Theranos Story, ch. 66: Walgreens and Safeway aren’t investors, they’re business partners! (Holmes’ defense strategy–erode her most serious charges)
Tunstall Healthcare (UK) and Group Holdings’ 2019 year end reports filed: highlights (The state of the company and a preview of new ownership) 

We open October with the US DOJ’s blockbuster indictments of multiple ‘telemedicine’ companies reaping billions in fraudulent payments. Sweden’s Doro continues its acquisition tear with Victrix, adding data analytics and proactive intervention capability to monitoring. Clinical trials are another coronavirus casualty–but RPM and telehealth may be able to help.

DOJ ‘takedown’ charges 86 defendants with $4.5 bn in fraudulent telemedicine claims in largest ever action (‘Telemedicine’ enters the big leagues of Medicare fraud for DME, tests, and drugs)
COVID-19’s negative impact on clinical trials–can remote patient monitoring and telehealth companies help? (Arkivum’s extensive study has implications)
Doro adds Spain’s Victrix SocSan to its growing brand portfolio for £1.28 million plus shares (A small but big move in Doro’s data analytics capabilities)

It’s summer’s last weekend, and we leave a Summer Like No Other bracketed by Amwell’s blockbuster IPO and Thank and Praise’s book on the early pandemic. Plenty of telehealth related reading with two reports from the Taskforce on Telehealth Policy and the UK TECS study. Walmart’s place in the Clinic Wars and a sensor-based fall detection system from Israel debuts. And the latest chapter in la scandale Theranos is la Holmes’ mental status.

News roundup: Amwell’s socko IPO raises $742M, Walmart and the Clinic Wars, Taskforce on Telehealth Policy report released, Israel’s Essence releases fall detection sensor system
Public Policy Projects, Tunstall UK release joint TECS study finding growth during pandemic, recommendations
The Theranos Story, ch. 65: Elizabeth Holmes’ “mental disease or defect” defense revealed (Stock up on popcorn and Twinkies)
The book of ‘Thank and Praise’ with a selection of their 1,000 messages (UK) (Thanking those who helped others)

Getting close to the unofficial end of summer in a year like no other (unless you count 1919?). We catch up with news and ISfTeH, Amwell finally IPOs with a Google kicker, Theranos’ denouement moves to 2021, and payer Humana sues a scam masquerading as a telehealth company. And we profile a movie project which will engage people on dementia.

Connected Health Summit 1-3 September (virtual): last days to register–50% off for TTA Readers! (see above)
Is the NHS ready to adopt telemedicine through and through–and is telemedicine ready? (COVID revealed the need, now for getting to the goal)
News roundup: CVS cashing out notes, catching up with ISfTeH, India’s Stasis Labs RPM enters US, Propeller inhaler with Novartis Japan, Cerner gets going with VA
QuivvyTech: a ‘telehealth’ company, sued by Humana in telemarketing scheme (US)
(An apparent scam with telehealth ‘lipstick’)
The Theranos Story, ch. 64: Holmes’ trial moved to March 2021 (Lady Justice is crying with boredom under that blindfold)
Amwell plans $100 million IPO, plus $100 million from Google as a kickoff (As predicted, but surprisingly modest in scope)
‘Before the Ashes Fall’: the story behind the book and the movie in development about dementia (Funding needed)

More signs of normality as we turn to topics other than COVID. We return to issues like data privacy and a Genomic Bill of Rights. ‘What’s hot in digital health’ lists reappear. And there’s another bumper crop of funding and acquisitions. Plus a fresh look at VR in medical education stimulated by the pandemic reaction.

Will the rise of technology mean the fall of privacy–and what can be done? UK seeks a new National Data Guardian. (Guarding the chicken coop with an open gate?)
CB Insights rounds up a 2020 Digital Health Top 150 (Not that different from 2019)
News Roundup of acquisitions, funding: Health Catalyst-Vitalware, Change Healthcare-Nucleus.io, Medtronic-Companion Medical, Cecelia Health; Proteus Health sale contested, but sold (updated 20 Aug) (More signs that we’re returning to a frothy ‘normal’)

Medical education going digital, virtual, and virtual reality (US/UK) (How med ed is adapting)

Is something vaguely resembling normality returning? We note and opine on multiple sales, acquisitions, and IPOs. The Propel@YH accelerator in Yorkshire returns for year 2. Walmart Health’s leader departs mysteriously. And another gimlety take on the Teladoc-Livongo deal from the ‘flight deck’.

News roundup: Ancestry sells 75% to Blackstone, Cornwall NHS partners with Tunstall, most dangerous health IT trends, Slovenski departs from Walmart Health (Activity a leading indicator of a return to normality)
Propel@YH digital health accelerator open now for applications to 24 September (UK) (Return to normality #2–important for your early stage company)
Doro AB acquires Eldercare (UK) Limited, creating #2 in telecare  (Piece by piece strategy)
Drug discounter GoodRx plans US IPO; Ginger mental health coaching raises $50 million (It’s getting foamier out there in the Digital Health Bubble Bath) 
Reflections in a Gimlet Eye: further skeptical thoughts on the Teladoc acquisition of Livongo (updated) (A message to Teladoc: just like on the flight deck, Human Factors will make–or doom–your success)

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Telehealth & Telecare Aware: covering the news on latest developments in telecare, telehealth, telemedicine and health tech, worldwide–thoughtfully and from the view of fellow professionals

Thanks for asking for update emails. Please tell your colleagues about this news service and, if you have relevant information to share with the rest of the world, please let me know.

Donna Cusano, Editor In Chief
donna.cusano@telecareaware.com

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UK highlights: Doro acquires Connexus Careline, Tunstall warns on winter isolation and disconnected care, Buddi seeks Sales Account Manager

Doro continues its acquisition streak in the UK, acquiring the assets of Connexus Careline from Connexus Housing Group. Connexus currently provides services to local authorities, housing associations, the private sector, and charities, with about 25,000 telecare connections in the UK. Terms and timing were not disclosed. Based on the August count, this brings Doro in at over 250,000 UK connections. Doro’s acquisitions have been ElderCare UK [TTA 11 Aug], Invicta Telecare, parent of Centra Pulse and Connect [TTA 19 Sept 19], and Welbeing [7 June 18], Press release (PDF).

So many open questions… What are their future plans for integrating all these individual systems and different technologies? What will Doro UK represent in the market, now that they are second in the UK?

Tunstall Healthcare UK is also reminding local governments, health and social care leaders that winter is approaching, and now is the time to set up remote patient monitoring to connect to care the most vulnerable in cold weather, a factor magnified by their isolation during the continuing pandemic. Tunstall features several solutions in RPM which are mentioned in the release.

Editor’s note: this type of seasonal release was a staple for QuietCare when I was in marketing for our activity/temperature monitoring of those living at home alone. We also included a proprietary study made during winter (and later summer) among our client base. 1) It’s surprising that more RPM and telecare companies don’t take this approach, especially now, but 2) Tunstall could have made an even greater case for itself with some quantitative research stats.

Buddi is seeking a Sales Account Manager position to join their Health Sales Team based in the southern half of England. The particulars are here (PDF) including application and contact information. Thank you Fiona Carmichael of Buddi for reaching out to us! (If you have a position to fill, our listings are complementary.)

Doro AB acquires Eldercare (UK) Limited, creating #2 in telecare

Healthcare acquisitions are not bypassing the UK and Europe. Today (11 Aug), Sweden’s Doro announced its acquisition of Eldercare (UK) Limited of Lancashire. Terms were announced as cash approximately UK £2.2 million on cash and debt free basis. It is effective immediately and Eldercare’s revenue will be consolidated into Doro’s from 11 August.

Eldercare adds 50,000 connections to the Doro portfolio, bringing them into second place in UK telecare with over 230,000 connections. Doro’s earlier UK acquisitions were in 2019, Invicta Telecare, parent of Centra Pulse and Connect, from Clarion Housing in the southeast [TTA 19 Sept 19] and in 2018, Welbeing in Eastbourne [7 June 18].

Doro’s CEO notes that Eldercare adds to their position in the North of England, important as telecare is a localized and council-focused business in the UK. With over 100 employees, Eldercare is also a Care Quality Commission (CQC) registered business and provides domiciliary care services. Eldercare’s CEO Chris Hopkinson is quoted in the release: “When we decided the time was right to step-change the development of our telecare services, we knew we needed an excellent partner. We chose Doro because we were impressed by their record of providing quality products and experience of delivering digital telecare solutions. They have shown their commitment to continue to improve and innovate the services we offer to our customers, as well as facilitating the transition to digital telecare in the UK.” 

Eldercare’s last independent financial report was for the financial year 2018/19, with revenue of UK £4.6 million (approximately SEK 52 million). 

Doro in many of its countries is best known for senior-friendly, easy to use wireless, mobile, and smart phones with add ons such as PERS apps. Eldercare, Invicta, and Welbeing are part of Doro Care, which markets social alarms and other home devices for the safety of older adults such as chair and epilepsy sensors. Hat tip to one of our faithful Readers.

Doro AB acquires Invicta Telecare from Clarion Housing, increasing to nearly 200,000 users (UK)

While this Editor was on holiday, Sweden’s Doro AB increased its presence in the UK with the acquisition of Invicta Telecare, parent of Centra Pulse and Connect. Invicta’s products will join the Welbeing PERS service. which at the time of their acquisition last June had about 75-80,000 users [TTA 7 June 18].

Invicta was sold by Clarion Housing Group, the UK’s largest social housing association, which includes a property development company and a charitable foundation. Invicta’s 2018 revenue was £6.3 million. Like Welbeing, Centra Pulse offers basic and mobile PERS, but also has multi-sensor in-home connected home capability. It is also one of the top three UK monitoring services and is a major provider of after-hours contact services for telecare providers, such as housing associations and local authorities. The sale was effective on 1 September.

The UK remains the largest telecare market in the European region with an estimated 1.8 million telecare connections. It faces a transition to digital from analog systems which affects social care spending and residential service capabilities. Doro operates in the UK and about 40 countries, with a core business in mobile phones specially designed for older adults. Doro announcement, press release

International acquisition roundup: Doro and Welbeing; Teladoc and Advance Medical

Two international telecare/telehealth/telemedicine M&A deals made the news this last week.

Sweden’s Doro AB acquired Welbeing, headquartered in Eastbourne UK. Welbeing (formally Wealden and Eastbourne Lifeline) is a telecare provider of home-based personal alarms which supports about 75,000 residents in local systems. Their revenue in last fiscal year (ending 9/17) was £7.6 million (SEK 90m). Doro operates in the UK and about 40 countries, with a core business in mobile phones specially designed for older adults. Their Doro Care solutions provide digital telecare and social services for older adults and the disabled in the home. Doro is paying SEK 130 million (£11.1 million) for the acquisition of Welbeing, equal to eight times estimated EBITDA for the financial year 2017/2018, with 85 percent cash and 15 percent in Doro shares with a bonus based on financial performance. Release 

Making a few headlines in the US is telemedicine leader Teladoc’s purchase of Barcelona’s Advance Medical for a hefty $352 million, giving Teladoc a major international footprint especially valuable for its corporate clients and major payers. Advance Medical provides complete telemedicine services in 125 countries in over 20 languages. Even more valuable is their knowledge of local healthcare delivery systems, global expert medical opinion, and chronic care. The acquisition also gives Teladoc an international network of offices and a significant entreé with international health insurance companies. Mobihealthnews, Seeking Alpha (Teladoc investor slideshow)

GreatCall’s acquisition: a big vote for older adult-centered healthcare tech

This midweek’s Big News has been the acquisition of the mobile phone/PERS company GreatCall by Chicago private equity firm GTCR. Cost of the acquisition is not disclosed. GTCR stated that they expect to make capital investments to GreatCall to fund future acquisitions and internal growth. GreatCall has over 800,000 subscribers in the US, generates about $250 million in profitable revenue annually, and employs about 1,000 people mainly in the San Diego area and Nevada. According to press sources, senior management led by CEO David Inns will remain in place and run the company independently. 

Our US Readers know of GreatCall’s long-standing (since 2006), bullseye-targeted appeal to older adults who desire a simple mobile flip phone, the Jitterbug, but has moved along with the age group to a simple smartphone with built-in health and safety apps. Along the way, GreatCall also developed and integrated the 5Star mPERS services on those phones, served by their own 24/7 emergency call center and developed an mPERS with fall detection. Their own acquisitions included the remnants of the Lively telecare home monitoring system in 2015 [TTA 5 Dec 15], adding the Lively Wearable mPERS/fitness tracker to their line; and senior community telecare service Healthsense last December. The original Lively home system and safety watch are sold in the UK (website) but apparently not the Jitterbug. In the UK and EU, the Jitterbug line would be competitive with established providers such as Doro.

What’s different here? GTCR is not a flashy, Silicon Valley PE investing in hot, young startups or a traditional senior health investor like Ziegler. Its portfolio is diversified into distinctly non-cocktail-chatter companies in financial services and technology; technology, media and telecommunications (including an outdoor ad company!); and growth businesses. It has real money, investing over $12 billion in 200 companies since 1980, and strategically prefers leadership companies. Their healthcare businesses have primarily been in life sciences, specialty pharma, dermatology, specialty services such as healthcare in correctional institutions, and device sterilization. Recent acquisitions have been San Diego-based XIFIN, a provider of cloud-based software to diagnostic service providers, RevSpring in billing and communications, and data analytics firm Cedar Gate Technologies. It also has partnered with newly formed medical device companies.

GreatCall crosses over into GTCR’s telecommunications sweet spot, but the older adult market and direct-to-consumer sell are different for them. Because it is unique in their portfolio, this Editor believes that GTCR sees ‘gold’ in the ‘silver’ market. Larry Fey, one of their managing directors, cited its growth and also GreatCall’s recent moves into senior communities with their products. GTCR also has expertise in the security alarm monitoring sector, which along with pharma clinical trials can bolster better utilization and broaden the utilization of GreatCall’s call centers.

However, this Editor would caution that the US senior community market has been having difficult times of late with overbuilding, declining occupancy, resident/labor turnover, and rising expenses–as well as recent coverage of security lapses and resident abuse. Telecare systems like Healthsense are major capital expenses, but the flip side is that communities can use technology to improve care, resident safety, and to differentiate themselves. To make the most of their Healthsense acquisition, GreatCall needs to bring innovation to the V1.0 monitoring/safety/care model that Healthsense is in its current state, and make the case for that innovation in cost/financials, usability and reliability. San Diego Union-Tribune, Mobihealthnews

MWC 2015 Part II – a few companies, some of potential interest

The Mobile World Congress in Barcelona does, as the name suggests, cover the whole mobile world. It can come as a disappointment then to find quite how insignificant Health is when compared to items like hardware, payment or even ‘4G backhaul’ (whatever that is). There certainly now seems to be a case for a sparate health stream, as finding the pearls proved very challenging for this reviewer. Relying on the search engine on the site too often revealed a company where too many boxes had been ticked. There was also an alarming number of healthtech ‘no shows’ on the when I reached the country stands of eg Finland, Greece & Italy.

However, there were a few exciting finds. These included:

Coros which are offering incredibly low-priced wearables: washable vests that do HR, respiration, temperature & ECG. If the prices I was quoted by Ethan Wu, Sales Director of a few $10s are good, and the kit works, they’ll be struggling to meet demand.

Dr Security offers an app that enables you to track all the people in your party, call for help, find your mobile device and more. Impressive and I’d have thought most welcome particularly for teachers with school parties or those with really any large outings.

Essence is an Israeli company that has been around for 20 years that offers an activities of daily living (ADL) monitoring service similar to (more…)

Doro opens first store, in Paris

Swedish firm Doro, best known for its easy-to-use mobile phones has announced the opening of its first [grow_thumb image=”http://telecareaware.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/Doro-Secure-211.jpg” thumb_width=”150″ /]store. The company, which bought the small French telecare technology provider Birdy Technology in 2011, says that the store, in Paris, will enable them to “get closer to the end user”.

Doro say in their press release that the store will enable them to show the full range of their offerings which are listed as smart devices, mobile phones and telecare solutions. The Birdy Box telecare hub, from their acquisition of Birdy Technology, has now been fully rebranded as Doro Gateway, part of the Doro Care offering. In addition, according to a quote from CEO Jérôme Arnaud, the store will enable Doro to increase its direct sales.

“The store in Paris will be followed by a gradual launch of Doro’s own e-commerce, planned to be introduced in several key markets during 2014” concludes the release, but no information is available as to what Doro plans to offer in the e-commerce arena.

How much longer will ‘mobile’ be different from ‘living’?

The news that the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona last week broke all attendance records is hardly surprising, given the way mobile communications are inserting their way into almost every aspect of life. It does though make one wonder how much longer the MWC can retain it’s broad focus as communications mobility becomes indistinguishable from normal living (and additional accommodation in Catalonia becomes harder to find). Indeed, as mHealth News pointed out last week, mobile comms keeps people living, worldwide

Not all age groups have been able to gain the same level of benefit from mobile comms though, most notably older people. It is therefore great to see (more…)

Doro 2.0 smartphone QSs with Withings (EU)

[grow_thumb image=”http://telecareaware.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/Doro-Liberto-810.jpg” thumb_width=”100″ /]Doro’s unveiling of their second smartphone, the Doro Liberto 810,  along with its ‘privileged access’ to two Withings devices–the Smart Body Analyzer (weight, body fat, heart rate) and Pulse Smart Activity Tracker–continues their moves into older adult-appealing mobile telecare/telehealth offerings, as tracked by founding Editor Steve since at least 2009.  Doro’s assertive move into Quantified Selfing as part of what they call ‘the world’s most liberating smartphone’, is more fully featured and was predicted by David Doherty earlier this year [TTA 25 Feb]. It is also not Doro’s first big alliance; late last year, Bosch Healthcare announced that Doro would be the mobile platform for telecare offerings in Germany and Sweden [TTA 16 Nov 2012]. Both the release and Mobihealthnews indicate that this offering will roll out to select European markets initially, but the latter states that a similar offering will debut in the US by early 2014. (For US readers, Doro is equivalent to GreatCall’s Jitterbug line) According to Mobile, the Liberto will be available in the UK in October.

Internet training for older people vs works-out-of-the-box mobiles

Echoing last week’s “the world has moved on” post on the WSD, the 3G Doctor (David Doherty) has an excellent opinion piece on how AGE UK should spend the money given to it by Google for making it to the final six in the Global Impact Challenge that supports British non-profits using technology to tackle tough problems.

In discussing Age UK’s current plans to use the money to teach older people about the internet he says: “For the £500,000 AGE UK would spend on training 16,000 seniors they could give away (at retail price!) 10,000 of the latest designed for senior 3G CameraPhones from Doro. Works straight out of the box. No training required.”

Elsewhere on his site he has an interesting take too on the reasons behind O2’s announcement last week.

Doro launches mobile telecare phone (EU)

Doro has revealed its latest handset – the Doro Secure 681.” According to an item in Mobile Magazine, the phone will launch in the second quarter of this year and is “aimed at people who currently rely on the support of a fixed-line telecare services, allowing them greater mobility outside the home.” The 681 is said to be the first mobile phone to feature an embedded ‘class one’ telecare radio receiver that is compatible with Doro’s wearable wrist, neck and fall sensors. Alerts can be sent to monitoring services via the internet or SMS. To this editor, if the photo in the above item is to be believed, the clamshell design and screen/keyboard layout is going to be too complicated for many people in the target market. It also looks like big-boy Doro has been learning a few lessons about the need to check and report battery charge levels automatically from UK small-guy Carephone. However Doro will have the advantage of being part of Bosch’s offering to the public. It will be interesting to see which gets traction with the public first, the Doro/Bosch combination or O2’s Health at Hand.