TTA’s week: CVS-Aetna–does it make sense? The Rivers of Babylon (Health). Tender alerts gift wrapped!

More on the ground-breaking CVS-Aetna merger–does it make sense? We wade into the rivers of Babylon Health’s pilots and present you with a large box of Tender Alerts for our UK companies.

And a reminder that you have just two more days to 15 Dec to submit your project for The King’s Fund 2018 Digital Health Congress.


Tender Alert: NHS England, London South Bank, Univ. of Leeds, NHS Digital, Halifax, Healthy New Towns (The last is big…really big)
Babylon Health: correcting earlier NW London CCG report; other concerns raised by CQC report (A deeper dive into The Rivers of Babylon and lessons to learn)
CVS-Aetna: the canary says that DOJ likely to review merger–plus further analysis and developments (It faces legal headwinds, may not make the most business sense–and has international repercussions affecting Walgreens Boots)

Is the CVS-Aetna merger heralding a new era, or an executional disaster in waiting? A lively #MedMo17 awards six startups. And Australia tries Health Care Homes for coordinated care.

Analysis of the CVS-Aetna merger: a new era, a canary in a mine–or both? (Are US healthcare execs in shock?)
#MedMo17: the conference, winning startups, Bayer, blockchain, and more (A lively conference report!)
Health Care Homes – treating chronic diseases in Australia (Coordinating care Down Under)

Does telemental care work?–the VA record. Secretary Shulkin moves forward on private care, Mayo’s Dr. Montori on care fitting into life. And HeyDoctor is Text 4 Doc.

OnePerspective: VA shows how technology can improve mental health care (Telemental health’s expansion chronicled in our new section)
VA’s Secretary Shulkin wants more private care options for veterans as part of reforms (Telehealth, private care coverage leading to better care)
Mayo Clinic’s Victor Montori MD calls for a ‘patient revolt’ for ‘careful and kind care’ (Expanding minimally disruptive medicine concept)
HeyDoctor! Come and get your diagnosis via text here! (Intriguing, but we see the downside)

Plenty of news before (US) Thanksgiving: NHS/Babylon Health’s London tests, Tunstall, Caribbean telemedicine. 

Rollout of second planned Babylon Health GP pilot for North West London scuttled (More unsettling news for Babylon’s model)
NHS, Public Health England testing multiple digital health devices for obesity, diabetes (Taking a year to do so with five suppliers)
NHS ‘GP at hand’ via Babylon Health tests in London–and generates controversy (Hits a GP brick wall)
Tunstall partners with voice AI in EU, home health in Canada, update on Ripple alerter in US (Changing their model, hopefully to profit)
Telemedicine comes to Saint Lucia–and the Caribbean (Seeking warmer climes doesn’t mean you leave telemedicine behind)

FDA’s approval of the first digital drug tracker. Reports on CES 2018, Aging 2.0.  Roundups on telehealth and companies. And Editor Charles cheerfully points out the difference between doers and advisors. 

Breaking: FDA approves the first drug with a digital ingestion tracking system (Proteus only took 16 years)
Telehealth roundups: Cuyahoga County (OH), BMJ systematic review, AAFP Forum (Telehealth results, PCP challenges)
Tender/Prior Information Alerts: North Yorkshire, North Ayrshire (Closing early 2018)
CES Unveiled’s preview of health tech at CES 2018 (5G, AI, VR, Extreme Tech, more)
BU CTE Center post-mortem presentation on Aaron Hernandez: stage 3 CTE (Can health tech even help?)
Some quick, cheerful updates from Welbeing, CarePredict, Tunstall, Tynetec, Hasbro, Fitbit
Themes and trends at Aging2.0 OPTIMIZE 2017 (Reinventing aging to thrive, not just survive)
A blogger’s lot is not a happy one (Editor Charles opines on the increasing disproportion between doers and advisers in the NHS) 

Of continued interest….

Fall risk in older adults may be higher during warm weather–indoors (A counterintuitive surprise marks need for gait detection/analytics)
How does the NHS get funded and work? The King’s Fund pulls it together for you. (Graphics and video)
Public Health England: we’re hiring to expand digital initiatives (A hiring blitz of 9 openings, more to come)
A few short topical items: NHS Digital, DHACA, IET, more (Editor Charles’ update)

CareRooms: the perils of “Silicon Valley hype” when your customer is the NHS (Discretion is the better part of valor)
Tender Alert: advance notice for NHS England ACS-STP Innovation Framework (Another big part of this NHS initiative)
Will Japan’s hard lessons on an aging population include those with dementia? (Japan’s bellwether rings again)

Have a job to fill? Seeking a position? Free listings available to match our Readers with the right opportunities. Email Editor Donna.


Read Telehealth and Telecare Aware: http://telecareaware.com/  @telecareaware

Follow our pages on LinkedIn and on Facebook

We thank our present and past advertisers and supporters: Tynetec, Eldercare, UK Telehealthcare, NYeC, PCHAlliance, ATA, The King’s Fund, HIMSS, Health 2.0 NYC, MedStartr, Parks Associates, and HealthIMPACT.

Reach international leaders in health tech by advertising your company or event/conference in TTA–contact Donna for more information on how we help and who we reach. See our advert information here. 


Telehealth & Telecare Aware: covering the news on latest developments in telecare, telehealth, telemedicine and health tech, worldwide–thoughtfully and from the view of fellow professionals

Subscribe here to receive this Alert as an email on Wednesdays with occasional Weekend Updates. It’s free–and we don’t lend out or sell our list–no spam here!

Donna Cusano, Editor In Chief, donna.cusano@telecareaware.com, @deetelecare

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Babylon Health: correcting earlier NW London CCG report; other concerns raised by CQC report (updated)

Correcting and commenting on our earlier report. This Editor had earlier published on 11 Dec, as follow up to the extensive coverage on Babylon Health’s ‘GP at hand’ pilot activity in London, summarizing a report in Digital Health stating that the North West London Collaboration of Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCG) ended plans for expanding a test of the Babylon video consult/symptom checker app for GP practices in that area and that the app could be ‘manipulated’ to secure GP appointments faster and would not reduce demands on GPs. The original article was first corrected at an NHS England‘s representative’s request to reinforce that this was a local CCG project and that NHS England was not involved. The second request we received last Friday was from Babylon Health’s PR representative, Giles Kenningham, principal at Trafalgar Strategy. It was certainly strong and quoted here, edited as indicated to remove the link to the original article and Mr. Kenningham’s signature:

Your recent article on Babylon is factually wrong and misleading (link removed):
You claim the babylon app was dropped after being manipulated by patients. The term ‘manipualtion’ has been removed from the board papers and is wrong. Similarly the planned pilot had never begun so there so nothing to roll out.
This story is based on incorrect board papers which have now been corrected.

Please find a spokesman quote below. (closing signature removed)

A spokesperson for Babylon said:

“No pilot was ever carried out, nor any agreement signed with Babylon for such a pilot.

“Discussions were held after Babylon was selected in a competitive procurement exercise as the best technology to trial in GP practices across North West London. Subsequently, a decision was taken not to fund the pilot.”

This Editor then checked on the Digital Health article and found it had been removed without any follow-up or correction. Thus on Friday 8 Dec, this Editor removed the article, thanked Mr. Kenningham for bringing it to attention, and added that our report cited Digital Health as the source. I also requested a reference or third-party confirmation of his corrections. (This last request was not received as of the time of this writing.)

Wanting to get to the bottom of this for our Readers–and as a marketer who’s corrected more than a few inaccurate reports, your Editor has located the CCG’s report which is here published 22 November. It corresponds with Mr. Kenningham’s full note. The CCG report appears to have been revised (the URL indicates a v3), there never was a Babylon pilot, this version does not use the word ‘manipulation’, and the end result was that the CCG decided not to proceed to the pilot stage. In short, it appears to this Editor that the Digital Health report was based on an earlier and incorrect version of the report (perhaps as early as 25 Oct) and we are of course happy to correct. My fault and apology to our Readers and to Babylon in that I should have located the 22 Nov revised report prior to publishing the article and essentially provided a correction to Digital Health‘s report.

However, the CCG’s report on their Babylon evaluation contains two findings that were included in Digital Health‘s now-deleted article and give some pause. The CCG used focus groups of potential users, which surfaced that, in the CCG’s words, “The focus groups had also commented that there is a risk of some people gaming the symptom checker to achieve a GP appointment. The insights gathered therefore revealed that the symptom checker in particular was unlikely to reduce demand for GP services.”

Updated: Our Editor Chrys has pointed out the Pulse article which also comments on this and was corrected for the CCG’s revised report. The comments here by practicing GPs are worth reading. Scroll down and you’ll see that  ‘gaming the system’ has happened using direct triage in practices using personal phone consults–no app required. Can this even work?

Focus groups are highly subjective, but they are great ways of surfacing the flaws that developers and companies have gone blind to.

We hope that Babylon Health does take this feedback seriously. This Editor makes no secret of her advocacy of technology that can speed the obtaining of care, but based on her experience with early-stage companies, every critique, every hole kicked in a service, delivery, and logistics should be appreciated–and ruthlessly scrutinized for flaws that need solutions. This becomes harder to do when you’ve achieved Big Funding. Babylon is typically burning a hole through it (The Times, 1 Oct–hat tip to Chrys). The pressure on now to find The Road to Breakeven is stunning.

Speaking of finding solutions, Babylon should also note the findings of the Care Quality Commission (CQC), not to be confused with the CCG, in their report published on Friday 8 December. The CQC is the independent regulator of all health and social care services in England; the closest US equivalent would be the Joint Commission. The CQC uses a five-point evaluation measure (page 3) developed via staff, stakeholders, organizational documents, and sample medical records. Their extensive evaluation is published here.

In most aspects, it’s a highly favorable evaluation by the CQC, except in three care areas: prescribing decisions were not always made appropriately, that prescribing information wasn’t always shared with the patient’s GP to ensure safety, and there was no system in place to give assurance that patients’ conditions were being appropriately monitored. This means to the CQC that Babylon is not meeting Regulation 12 HSCA (RA) Regulations 2014 ‘Safe care and treatment’ in three aspects which are summarized on page 13 and detailed in the report.

What was distressing is that the HSJ (paid subscription only) reported that “Babylon Health Services has failed to stop the publication of a Care Quality Commission report that states it is not providing a safe service in some areas.” and that the CQC report was published after an injunction was lifted. It is one thing to differ with the findings, another thing to use legal action to stop a regulator’s report, but at this point we only have the HSJ article stating this. This Editor is standing by for further reports on this matter and Reader citations of further information. Hat tips to Roy Lilley, Editor Emeritus Steve Hards, and Editor Chrys.

TTA’s week: CVS-Aetna’s implications, #MedMo17 report, Aussie Health Care Homes test

Is the CVS-Aetna merger heralding a new era, or an executional disaster in waiting? A lively #MedMo17 awards six startups. And Australia tries Health Care Homes for coordinated care.

Special to Alerts Readers: One free place at The King’s Fund Leeds meeting on 13 December. Last week! See offer below. And a reminder that you have one more week to 15 Dec to submit your project for the 2018 Digital Health Congress.


For our UK Readers: The King’s Fund has been kind enough to offer to our Readers one complimentary spot to their Wednesday 13 December ‘Sharing health and care records’ conference at the Horizon Leeds. If you would like to attend, email us by end of day Thursday 7 December at Extras@telecareaware.com with your name, title, and organization. Put in subject line of the email “KF-Leeds Ticket”. The winner will be chosen from best responses and notified by Friday 8 December.


Analysis of the CVS-Aetna merger: a new era, a canary in a mine–or both? (Are US healthcare execs in shock?)
#MedMo17: the conference, winning startups, Bayer, blockchain, and more (A lively conference report!)
Health Care Homes – treating chronic diseases in Australia (Coordinating care Down Under)

Does telemental care work?–the VA record. Secretary Shulkin moves forward on private care, Mayo’s Dr. Montori on care fitting into life. And HeyDoctor is Text 4 Doc.

OnePerspective: VA shows how technology can improve mental health care (Telemental health’s expansion chronicled in our new section)
VA’s Secretary Shulkin wants more private care options for veterans as part of reforms (Telehealth, private care coverage leading to better care)
Mayo Clinic’s Victor Montori MD calls for a ‘patient revolt’ for ‘careful and kind care’ (Expanding minimally disruptive medicine concept)
HeyDoctor! Come and get your diagnosis via text here! (Intriguing, but we see the downside)

Plenty of news before (US) Thanksgiving: NHS/Babylon Health’s London tests, Tunstall, Caribbean telemedicine. 

Rollout of second planned Babylon Health GP pilot for North West London scuttled (More unsettling news for Babylon’s model)
NHS, Public Health England testing multiple digital health devices for obesity, diabetes (Taking a year to do so with five suppliers)
NHS ‘GP at hand’ via Babylon Health tests in London–and generates controversy (Hits a GP brick wall)
Tunstall partners with voice AI in EU, home health in Canada, update on Ripple alerter in US (Changing their model, hopefully to profit)
A fistful of topical events (London Health Technology, NICE briefings, Planetary Health, RSM, DHACA, with a splash of Club Soda!)
Telemedicine comes to Saint Lucia–and the Caribbean (Seeking warmer climes doesn’t mean you leave telemedicine behind)

FDA’s approval of the first digital drug tracker. Reports on CES 2018, Aging 2.0. Looking forward to four conferences in NYC at end of November. Roundups on telehealth and companies. And Editor Charles cheerfully points out the difference between doers and advisors. 

Breaking: FDA approves the first drug with a digital ingestion tracking system (Proteus only took 16 years)
Telehealth roundups: Cuyahoga County (OH), BMJ systematic review, AAFP Forum (Telehealth results, PCP challenges)
Tender/Prior Information Alerts: North Yorkshire, North Ayrshire (Closing early 2018)
CES Unveiled’s preview of health tech at CES 2018 (5G, AI, VR, Extreme Tech, more)
BU CTE Center post-mortem presentation on Aaron Hernandez: stage 3 CTE (Can health tech even help?)
Some quick, cheerful updates from Welbeing, CarePredict, Tunstall, Tynetec, Hasbro, Fitbit
Themes and trends at Aging2.0 OPTIMIZE 2017 (Reinventing aging to thrive, not just survive)
A blogger’s lot is not a happy one (Editor Charles opines on the increasing disproportion between doers and advisers in the NHS) 


Having the ability to share health and care records digitally is essential to offering better, more co-ordinated care for local populations. But delivering the key benefits requires three things: the appropriate technology, the right governance structure and a culture of adoption. Learn about this at The King’s Fund’s 13 Dec full day conference at Horizon Leeds, where you will explore the different models that have been developed over the past few years and learn how local areas are overcoming these challenges. Click on the advert to register or here


Of continued interest….

Fall risk in older adults may be higher during warm weather–indoors (A counterintuitive surprise marks need for gait detection/analytics)
How does the NHS get funded and work? The King’s Fund pulls it together for you. (Graphics and video)
Public Health England: we’re hiring to expand digital initiatives (A hiring blitz of 9 openings, more to come)
A few short topical items: NHS Digital, DHACA, IET, more (Editor Charles’ update)

CareRooms: the perils of “Silicon Valley hype” when your customer is the NHS (Discretion is the better part of valor)
Tender Alert: advance notice for NHS England ACS-STP Innovation Framework (Another big part of this NHS initiative)
Will Japan’s hard lessons on an aging population include those with dementia? (Japan’s bellwether rings again)
CVS’ bid for Aetna–will it happen, and kick off a trend? (updated) (Where do payers, retailers go to expand?)


Have a job to fill? Seeking a position? Free listings available to match our Readers with the right opportunities. Email Editor Donna.


Read Telehealth and Telecare Aware: http://telecareaware.com/  @telecareaware

Follow our pages on LinkedIn and on Facebook

We thank our present and past advertisers and supporters: Tynetec, Eldercare, UK Telehealthcare, NYeC, PCHAlliance, ATA, The King’s Fund, HIMSS, Health 2.0 NYC, MedStartr, Parks Associates, and HealthIMPACT.

Reach international leaders in health tech by advertising your company or event/conference in TTA–contact Donna for more information on how we help and who we reach. See our advert information here. 


Telehealth & Telecare Aware: covering the news on latest developments in telecare, telehealth, telemedicine and health tech, worldwide–thoughtfully and from the view of fellow professionals

Subscribe here to receive this Alert as an email on Wednesdays with occasional Weekend Updates. It’s free–and we don’t lend out or sell our list–no spam here!

Donna Cusano, Editor In Chief, donna.cusano@telecareaware.com, @deetelecare

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NHS, Public Health England testing multiple digital health devices for obesity, diabetes

NHS England, Public Health England, and Diabetes UK launched a pilot, announced on World Diabetes Day on 14 November, to test various digital health approaches to controlling obesity and Type 2 diabetes. Approximately 5,000 patients will be recruited for a test period of up to one year. Multiple apps, gadgets, wristbands, and other digital devices to measure their results against goals will be tested,  combined with health coaching and online support groups. NHS is also offering to some wearable devices which record activity levels and receive motivational messages and prompts. 

The test will use products and services from five companies and the patients will be recruited from eight areas of the country. The companies, programs, and tools are:

  • Hitachi – Smart Digital Diabetes Prevention program combines an online portal + coaching
  • Buddi Nujjer – a wristband which monitors the user’s activity, sleep patterns and eating frequency, paired with a smartphone application
  • Liva Healthcare – 12 months of a dedicated coach starting with a personal face-to-face meeting. The Liva platform and patient app supports the patient with smart goal setting and plans, lifestyle tracking, video communication, and online peer to peer support.
  • Oviva – An eight-week intensive lifestyle intervention with an experienced dietitian providing personalized advice and support.
  • OurPath – A six-week mobile and desktop digital program with structured education on healthy eating, sleep, exercise and stress management.

The pilot builds on Healthier You: The NHS Diabetes Prevention Programme, launched last year to support people who are at high risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. This adds digital tools to a coaching-intensive, educational, and activity-oriented program. Public Health England also has the Active 10 app, which encourages at least 10 minutes of daily brisk walking. NHS press release, Digital Health

NYC Healthcare Innovation Festival: four big events 28 Nov – 6 Dec–readers get 20% off

NYC will be a health and health tech-related hub for a busy 10 days between the holidays of Thanksgiving and the run-up to Christmas. Run by four separate organizations, they are being co-marketed as the NYC Healthcare Innovation Festival. So after you digest your turkey and trimmings, you’ll have four great conferences plus an opportunity to do some holiday shopping in NYC! Registration for each event is separate–see the discount code below offered by NYCHIF!

HITLAB Innovators Summit, 28-30 November, Columbia University, Lerner Hall, 114th Street (2920 Broadway)

This is a provider/pharma-focused three-day meeting, with topics ranging from implementing entrepreneurial principles in life science companies to M&A and investing trends in digital health. HITLAB is affiliated with Columbia University. It hosts the 2017 HITLAB World Cup of Voice-Activated Technology in Diabetes, presented by Novo Nordisk, the main sponsor. Click the title above for more information and registration.

MedStartr Momentum 2017 (MedMo17), 30 November – 1 December, PricewaterhouseCoopers headquarters, 300 Madison Avenue @42nd Street

MedStartr’s third annual Momentum meeting will be highlighting the young companies which will be transforming the future of healthcare. Want to get involved with the best new companies in healthcare? Join the five pitch contests, nine Momentum talks, and seven panels over two full days, all about driving innovation in healthcare from the perspectives of patients, doctors, partners, institutions, and investors. Sponsored by MedStartr and Health 2.0 NYC, this attracts a wide swath of speakers and participants from global healthcare players to startups and academia. It promises to be a lively gathering! TTA is a MedStartr and Health 2.0 NYC supporter/media sponsor since 2010; Editor Donna will be a host for this event and a MedStartr Mentor. Check the MedStartr page to find and fund some of the most interesting startup ideas in healthcare. For more information and to register, click the link in the title above or the sidebar advert at right.

NODE Health Digital Medicine Conference, 4-5 December, Microsoft Innovation Center, 11 Times Square

What will be the effective digital solutions bringing value across the healthcare continuum? Health system, payer, pharma, investors, academics, and healthcare tech executives will be discussing how to use digital health to improve outcomes, patient experience, and population health, and review the scientific evidence for digital innovation. It’s a combination of special sessions, workshops, Center of Excellence Tours, exhibitions, and poster sessions. TTA is a media partner of NODE Health 2017. Click the title above for more information and registration. (more…)

Themes and trends at Aging2.0 OPTIMIZE 2017

Aging2.0 OPTIMIZE, in San Francisco on Tuesday and Wednesday 14-15 November, annually attracts the top thinkers and doers in innovation and aging services. It brings together academia, designers, developers, investors, and senior care executives from all over the world to rethink the aging experience in both immediately practical and long-term visionary ways.

Looking at OPTIMIZE’s agenda, there are major themes that are on point for major industry trends.

Reinventing aging with an AI twist

What will aging be like during the next decades of the 21st Century? What must be done to support quality of life, active lives, and more independence? From nursing homes with more home-like environments (Green House Project) to Bill Thomas’ latest project–‘tiny houses’ that support independent living (Minkas)—there are many developments which will affect the perception and reality of aging.

Designers like Yves Béhar of fuseproject are rethinking home design as a continuum that supports all ages and abilities in what they want and need. Beyond physical design, these new homes are powered by artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning technology that support wellness, engagement, and safety. Advances that are already here include voice-activated devices such as Amazon Alexa, virtual reality (VR), and IoT-enabled remote care (telehealth and telecare).

For attendees at Aging2.0, there will be substantial discussion on AI’s impact and implications, highlighted at Tuesday afternoon’s general session ‘AI-ging Into the Future’ and in Wednesday’s AI/IoT-related breakouts. AI is powering breakthroughs in social robotics and predictive health, the latter using sensor-based ADL and vital signs information for wellness, fall prevention, and dementia care. Some companies part of this conversation are CarePredict, EarlySense, SafelyYou, and Intuition Robotics.

Thriving, not surviving

Thriving in later age, not simply ‘aging in place’ or compensating for the loss of ability, must engage the community, the individual, and providers. There’s new interest in addressing interrelated social factors such as isolation, life purpose, food, healthcare quality, safety, and transportation. Business models and connected living technologies can combine to redesign post-acute care for better recovery, to prevent unnecessary readmissions, and provide more proactive care for chronic diseases as well as support wellness.

In this area, OPTIMIZE has many sessions on cities and localities reorganizing to support older adults in social determinants of health, transportation innovations, and wearables for passive communications between the older person and caregivers/providers. Some organizations and companies contributing to the conversation are grandPad, Village to Village Network, Lyft, and Milken Institute.

Technology and best practices positively affect the bottom line

How can senior housing and communities put innovation into action today? How can developers make it easier for them to adopt innovation? Innovations that ‘activate’ staff and caregivers create a multiplier for a positive effect on care. Successful rollouts create a positive impact on both the operations and financial health of senior living communities.

(more…)

Public Health England: we’re hiring to expand digital initiatives

Public Health England is going on a bit of a hiring blitz, with currently nine posts on offer and more to come over the next few months, according to a report on PublicTechnology.net. Digital health is coming up front, with their stated intent to support an in-house user-centered design team and expanding their project- and delivery-management functions. The positions are manager and designer levels. This does seem in concert with NHS England initiatives noted on our most recent Tender Alerts. Those interested should refer to Gov.UK’s page on Working for PHE with links to Civil Service and NHS Jobs. Hat tip to Susanne Woodman of BRE.

And speaking of new jobs, Dr. Mike Short, who was a senior executive for many years with Telefónica (the O2 mobile network) and quite active in advocating digital health, has joined the UK Department for International Trade as their first Chief Scientific Adviser. He is also currently a visiting professor at the universities of Surrey, Coventry, Leeds and Lancaster. Congratulations! Another from PublicTechnology.net

Counting down to the Connected Health Conference–readers save $100!

Connected Health Conference
25-27 October, Seaport World Trade Center, 200 Seaport Boulevard, Boston

The eighth annual Connected Health Conference, presented by the Personal Connected Health Alliance (PCHAlliance) in partnership with Partners Connected Health, is coming up in just a few days.

Wednesday is packed with special sessions that cover the state of the market in wearables, artificial intelligence (AI), voice-activated technologies, the smart home (hosted by Parks Associates) and the innovation economy.

  • The Life Sciences and MedTech Roundtable will explore the emerging category of digital therapeutics, the evolution of traditional pharma and med tech business models and the impact on relationships with patients, providers and other stakeholders in healthcare.
  • Europe Meets North America will exchange views and strategies on issues like interoperability and the free flow of data across borders in an all-day workshop hosted by the ECHAlliance. (For more on the PCHAlliance’s EU efforts to ensure consistent regulations governing digital health with the implementation of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), see this release.)

Recent additions to the main conference on Thursday and Friday:

  • A new fifth track focusing on health system innovation projects, outcomes and processes with the leading partnerships that are disrupting and redesigning healthcare delivery, including Healthbox and Intermountain Healthcare, Brigham Digital Innovation Hub, Johns Hopkins Medicine Technology Innovation Center and MITRE sharing their work with Dana-Farber.
  • The new Innovation Lounge will showcase provider, industry and institutional innovation centers and novel collaborations. The Innovation Lounge stage will present groundbreaking initiatives from Intel, IBM, MDRevolution and Becton Dickinson, HHS Idea Lab, data from the IPSOS Digital Doctor Survey, and results of a recent connected health survey. Dr. Joseph Kvedar will share a preview of his new book, The New Mobile Age, How Technology Will Extend the Healthspan and Optimize the Lifespan. (more…)

StartUp Health’s Q3 is an even crazier $9bn YTD

And you thought Q2 was ‘crazy’? There’s no cooling in StartUp Health’s reported digital health funding activity in Q3, which at $9bn is already past 2016’s $8.1bn and is poised to cross the $10bn bar by end of year.

  • Q3 charted $2.5bn in funding, less than Q2 ($3.8bn) but above Q3 2016 ($2.2bn).
  • Series C and D deals led the funding charge at 15 percent of deals, with Series D on average $113 million. It’s an indicator of market maturity, though A rounds were still in the lead at 35 percent and 21 percent in Series B.
  • Deals are bigger than ever at an average $18 million versus $14 million in 2016
  • Half the deals they tracked were in personalized health and patient/consumer experience, a distinct difference from Rock Health’s shift to B2B. Population health held its own.
  • They tracked more mega-deals YTD due to broader category and ex-US. Rock Health’s lead this quarter of 23andMe was only #6 on the list, surpassed by Auris, Peloton, Guardant Health, Outcome Health, and Grail.
  • The Bay Area leads for deals substantially YTD, with NYC, Boston, and Chicago combined still trailing

Remember that StartUp Health takes a wider sample than Rock Health [TTA 3 Oct], tracking over 500 international company deals, including those below $2 million as well as both service and biotech/diagnostic companies. StartUp Health on Slideshare.

Connected Health Conference 25-27 October, Boston–save $100! (updated)

Connected Health Conference, 25-27 October, Seaport World Trade Center, Boston Massachusetts

The eighth annual Connected Health Conference, is now presented by the Personal Connected Health Alliance (PCHAlliance) in partnership with Partners Connected Health, with a combined and rebooted annual meeting in Boston. The largest global conference in connected health has surfed many changes from the time it was started as the mHealth Summit (and Telecare Aware was one of the first media sponsors) in Washington, DC. This year’s theme, The Connected Life Journey: Shaping Health and Wellness for Every Generation, is centered around the future of technology-enabled health, wellness and what innovation means for over 2,000 providers, researchers, healthcare executives, and developers. CHC17’s location is now in Boston’s Innovation District versus a fairly remote part of Foggy Bottom–and early fall! (For more on CHC’s evolution, see here.)

Wednesday the 25th has a full day of pre-conference specialized sessions here, such as the Society for Participatory Medicine and Parks Associates‘ workshop, with the full conference and open exhibit hall on Thursday and Friday. Continua has a running Plugfest for those involved with Continua standards on Thursday and Friday. Also on those days is CHC’s own Health Tech StandOut! Competition featuring a group of ten finalists, free for conference registrants and the Connected Health Innovation Challenge (CHIC) (information here).

For the main website and for registration, click on the ad in the sidebar. TTA Readers save $100 on registration–use code CHC17TELE100. TTA is a media sponsor of CHC17. For updates, see on Twitter #Connect2Health and @PCHAlliance

Update: The PCHAlliance published today a research paper, Personal Connected Health: The State of the Evidence and a Call to Action. This is a meta-study of 53 studies and trials for setting an initial baseline for evidence in personal connected health. The key findings on the current state will come as no surprise–that better studies are needed that show evidence in clinical trials and real-world use. Release, study (download links)

‘Serving with heart’: two glimpses of innovation in Singapore and Thailand

Probably a first for this Editor is news from Singapore on the healthcare technology and innovation front. The first report comes from Today where Deputy Prime Minister Teo Chee Hean advocates for the interesting combination of embracing innovation and ‘serving patients with heart.’ Speaking at the opening of the Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine’s Clinical Sciences Building in Novena, Mr. Teo talked not only about pathogens and biomedical research but also about remote patient monitoring, tele-consulting, and home-care robots.

From Thailand but addressing the Asia-Pacific market is Caroline Clarke, CEO for Philips Asean Pacific, on the region’s aging population and the outlook to 2050. Asia is home to 60 percent of the world’s over-60 population which is expected to grow from 547 million in 2016 to nearly 1.3 billion by 2050. She noted that the Future Health Index noted that while the benefits of connected care technologies were known in Asia, there was a lack of understanding on how and why to use them to take better care of their health. Philips has opened a regional headquarters in Singapore with advanced innovation facilities, announcing a partnership with EDBI to co-invest in regional digital health companies. The Nation

Tunstall pairing with Inhealthcare digital health for NHS remote monitoring

click to enlargeA digital link of hope for Tunstall’s future? Announced at The King’s Fund Digital Health & Care Conference but oddly not receiving much notice was the UK collaboration of Tunstall Healthcare and Inhealthcare. Inhealthcare builds infrastructure for digital health services, and currently works extensively with multiple NHS regions and programs, such as the North of England Regional Back Pain Programme, NHS England’s Sheffield City Region Test Bed and the Darlington Healthy New Town project. Their services include telehealth monitoring for INR, COPD, medication reminders, a smartphone app platform, chronic pain management, and a surprising one that addresses undernutrition in older adults. The Tunstall-Inhealthcare objective is to integrate health and social care with clinical care systems in six areas: LTC home monitoring, identifying vulnerable patients, involving family members, 24/7 clinical care coordination centers, post-discharge management, and digital health at home innovation. Also noted is that Inhealthcare has programming technology that can reduce the time to build out services and apps.

Inhealthcare Ltd is part of Intechnology plc, owned by Peter Wilkinson, who has developed several UK internet and technology companies at scale–Planet Online, Freeserve, and Sports Internet (now Sky Betting and Gaming). Tunstall release

Q1 digital health investment: two perspectives from StartUp Health and Rock Health

StartUp Health’s and Rock Health’s investment/M&A roundups from Q1 2017 have just hit the deck. Before we dig into them, let’s start with the differences in methodology:

  • Rock Health tracks deals only over $2 million in value; StartUp Health seems to have no minimum or maximum; the latter includes early stage deals at a lower value.
  • StartUp Health gathers in international deals at all levels, whereas Rock Health includes only US-funded ventures.
  • Rock Health omits healthcare services companies (citing Forward, Oscar), biotech/diagnostic companies (GRAIL, Theranos), and software companies not solely focused on healthcare (Zenefits)
  • StartUp Health defines ‘digital health’ differently than Rock Health, with categories of ‘patient/consumer experience’, ‘wellness’, ‘personalized health/quantified self’, and ‘research’

StartUp Health is ‘over the moon’, breathlessly (appropriately as the home of the 25-year Health Moonshot) with Q1 trending, seeing the biggest investment quarter since 2010 at $2.5 bn. Topping up this number was GRAIL, which is developing a blood test for early cancer detection, with a massive Series B at $914 million. Far behind it in the $85-110 million range were (in descending order) Alignment Healthcare (population health), PatientsLikeMe (patient/consumer experience), Nuna (big data/analytics), and PointClickCare (EHR). Population health, patient/consumer experience, and research top their investment activity. Most deals are still seed and Series A (59 percent), but that is down five points from full year 2016; Series B’s share is up three points to 25 percent. But it remains a difficult bridge to cross to C+ rounds.

Rock Health splits the difference and calls it ‘business as usual’, surprised that there hasn’t been a tailspin. Its Q1 sandwiches between 2016 and 2015, well above 2015 but trending 23 percent below Q1 2016. Their biggest deals include the aforementioned Alignment, PatientsLikeMe and Nuna, omitting GRAIL and PointClickCare. Their top three investment categories are analytics/big data, care coordination, and telemedicine (over $50 million). Rock Health tracked almost 20 M&A, noting that many transactions are now ex-California. They also uniquely track public company performance. Here in 2016 is where Readers first noted weakness in NantHealth, but Fitbit and Castlight Health also had miserable quarters. Teladoc, Evolent Health (consulting), and Care.com had a good winter as well. Let’s see what Q2 brings.

HealthIMPACT’s upcoming events for 2017 (US)

The HealthIMPACT series of mainly single-day events on health tech/HIT’s effect on healthcare now covers several major cities in the US. What this Editor likes about them is that they compress a great deal of information in a single day, with well-presented, relaxed panel discussions with top executives and figures in the industry. They are also held in interesting venues like the Union League Club in NYC. Panels are being hosted this year by former colleagues from Health 2.0 NYC Megan Antonelli of Purpose Events and “The Healthcare IT Guy” Shahid Shah, with new vice chair Mandi Bishop, a HIT entrepreneur who was a Challenge Competitor at #MedMo16. Here’s the HealthIMPACT schedule with links to the individual events:

HealthIMPACT Southwest
Texas Medical Innovation Center | TMCx
April 4th, 2017  Receive a 20% discount off registration–use HIEB2017

HealthIMPACT Southeast
Florida Hospital Innovation Lab, Werner Auditorium, Orlando, FL
May 4th, 2017

HealthIMPACT East
Union League Club, New York, NY
June 5th, 2017 (note that this is a new date, changed from the date on the website)

HealthIMPACT WISE/Women in Information Science Retreat
Sundance Mountain Resort, Sundance, UT
June 23-25, 2017

HealthIMPACT Midwest
Matter Health, Chicago, IL
September 14, 2017

HealthIMPACT West
San Francisco, CA, October 7, 2017

TTA is a media partner of HealthIMPACT for 2017.

What is the future of digital technology in NHS England for the haves and have-nots?

This thoughtful essay published on The King’s Fund blog by David Maguire discusses the uncertain way forward for digitizing health within NHS England as part of the sustainability and transformation plan (STP). There’s a certain lack of vision and support from the top; there is £4.2 billion in funding over the next five years from the Department of Health, but priorities including ‘Paperless by 2020’ are unclear. There needs to be a ‘clear and definitive plan’, but at the same time, local innovation shouldn’t be stifled. Local areas vary widely in capability and resources. As Mr Maguire points out, some are still using Windows XP and others are well advanced in data analytics; some are more willing to take risks and have a “collective vision”. In a funding-constrained environment, local areas may find themselves scraping up, pooling resources to create the systems they need, and sharing that knowledge. Seizing opportunities for digital development in the NHS Hat tip to Susanne Woodman.

A reminder that the Digital Health and Care Congress is on 11-12 July. Preview video and the event page; the Digital Health Congress fact sheet includes information on sponsoring or exhibiting. To make the event more accessible, there are new reduced rates for groups and students, plus bursary spots available for patients and carers. TTA is again a media partner of the Digital Health Congress 2017. Updates on Twitter @kfdigital17

British Journal of Cardiology (BJC) Digital Healthcare Forum’s inaugural meeting

28 April, 9:30am-5pm, Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, London 

Henry Purcell of the BJC was kind enough to post us with information on the first-ever BJC Digital Healthcare Forum. Organized by the BJC in association with the NHS, the Digital Health and Care Alliance (DHACA), and the Telehealth Quality Group, it is a novel ‘hands on’ meeting to assess if digital medicine can fill gaps in healthcare provision throughout the NHS. It is also in response to the massive pressures which winter has wrought on NHS health and social services. The Forum was designed by clinicians and leaders in healthcare informatics for UK commissioners, doctors and other HCPs involved in the management of long-term conditions (cardiovascular, obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes etc.), as well as those engaged in health informatics, IT, and Trust CEOs. Speakers include Dr Malcolm Fisk of De Montfort University, our own Charles Lowe of DHACA, Professor Tony Young, National Clinical Director for Innovation (NHS England) and many more experts in digital health and care. For the latest information and to register, see the event website or the attached PDF.