Successful Aging 2030: how far we haven’t come, how far we have to go

[grow_thumb image=”http://telecareaware.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/dhealth2017_300x75_2.png” thumb_width=”200″ /]This Editor attended last Wednesday’s (10 May) d.Health Summit 2017–Successful Aging 2030, sponsored by the University of Rochester and West Health. It was an expansive, well-organized and attended seminar at the New York Academy of Sciences at the impressive new 7 World Trade Center. Panels covered economic, housing, health outcomes, government policy, technology innovation, and investing factors key to one central fact: that in the US, nearly 20 percent of the population will be over 65 by 2030. Worldwide, the numbers are already much higher as of 2015: Japan (26 percent), Italy (22), Greece, Germany, Portugal (21) with nearly all of Europe already near that magic number (World Bank).

What was dispiriting to this Editor was that in her now 11 years in related health tech (telehealth and telecare), the status of many issues were the same as in 2006. The inadequacy of ‘aging in place’ supports and “assisted living”; a culture that brutally devalues people as they get older starting after 50; a belief that whiz-bang technology will fix it, but it doesn’t; the non-recognition of ‘aging-consumer-driven healthcare’; the lack of attention from investors because aging is not glamorous–are still there. What was hopeful? The candid recognition of these factors and the open discussion around them. There was a blunt admission expressed somewhat differently by two speakers, June Fisher MD of UC Berkeley and Charlotte Yeh of AARP, that without co-designing solutions with older people, we will get nowhere, and that imposing ‘fixes’ from the outside hasn’t and isn’t going to work. We also have a new middle age of 55-75, but the work market and employers have not adapted to that lengthening of productiveness, with the ‘pasture’ of retirement still pegged theoretically at 65.

Highlights of each panel:

The Longevity Economy, or the Silver Economy, was estimated by Merrill Lynch‘s Surya Kolluri at $7 trillion, with a surprising 90 percent of package goods spending done by 65+, and not just that but also areas such as home improvement. But healthcare spending is about 200 percent over the population average, and caregiving factors into that as well. There are profit opportunities for companies in this market, including developing/future areas such as robotics. (more…)

Changing care models to connect better with care, age at home

While this Editor didn’t get to the second annual d.Health Summit in NYC this past May, the organizers Avi Seidmann, PhD & Ray Dorsey, MD [TTA 20 July] of the University of Rochester have conveniently distilled the day down to a 13-page policy paper on successful aging at home. The keynote speaker set the theme around the core needs of older people:

  • identity (“help me stay me”)
  • routine (“help me stay in control”)
  • sociability (“help me stay engaged”)
  • vitality (“help me stay physically and mentally fit”)

Innovation around healthcare delivery, mobility solutions, assistive technologies that adjust to a wide variety of needs, socialization outlets and home services can improve health and wellness while reducing costs for the healthcare system as a whole.  Impediments are regulatory, interoperability and that old devil, payments. It needs to move to ‘next generational care” where healthcare tech fully becomes an extension of the healthcare system. Can’t come soon enough. Download the PDF here. Also read contributor Sarianne Gruber’s perspectives on the conference in RCM Answers on 18 May and 24 May.

The State of the Connected Patient is a 21-page survey with plenty of bar charts of over 2,000 Americans taken in June by the Harris Poll sponsored by Salesforce, which we’ve noted here is partnering notably with Philips in the HealthSuite digital platform. Analysis is separated by boomers, millennials and Gen X.  62 percent of respondents would be open to some form of ‘virtual care’–and 52 percent of ‘millennials’ would prefer to choose a doctor who uses virtual care tools. Most are content with their primary care doctor, though that doctor may not recognize them in the street. Only a quarter actually keep track of their health records, digital and otherwise. Apps are used, but all age groups are split evenly in using a wearable if an insurance company or provider gave them to wear in exchange for (respectively) lower rates and health information access. Download PDF via EHR Intelligence.

Some New York-area events of interest April-May

[grow_thumb image=”http://telecareaware.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/iCAN-Global-EBF-logo.jpg” thumb_width=”150″ /]Long-time Reader Howard Reis of telemedicine and teleradiology consultancy HEALTHePRACTICES  has advised us of two free and related events in the Westchester (NY metro) area of interest to entrepreneurs. Both are 21 April at the BioInc Incubator at Westchester Medical College, Valhalla NY.

The first is the bi-monthly iCAN NY breakfast from 8:30 to 10:30 am with the overall topic of commercialization of technologies, with talks from Mr Reis on industry healthcare trends and Michael and Stanley Goldstein from law firm Becker & Poliakoff on corporate governance. Registration via email to Les Neumann, iCAN NY managing director, at les@icanny.net.

The second is a half day ‘Pitch to the Angels’ sponsored by Westchester Angels and Westfair Communications starting at 9:30am through lunch closing at 1:30pm for local entrepreneurs (Westchester and Fairfield counties). It is a two-part event open to startups, entrepreneurs, investors and spectators. You can sign up for the morning or the lunchtime session, or both. Three or four businesses will be pitching in the pm session. Information here. Registration here. Interested in pitching? Submit to be considered here but hurry–it closes 8 April. Contact is Danielle Brody at dbrody@westfairinc.com.

d.Health Summit on 4 May at the NY Academy of Sciences in NYC is focusing this year on a worthy topic, ‘Aging in Place.’ There’s a roster of speakers from the usual journalist, payer and academic suspects, perhaps too many for one day, for your $695 registration. Unfortunately your locally-based Editor, after several fruitless attempts to contact the organizers, cannot offer any further information beyond the website or an endorsement.

Having attended the much-touted MUSE-Klick Health NY evening soireé this past Wednesday, which attempted to be over the top (High Line District! Industrial Converted to Art Space!), it wound up being uninspiring (except for 18 year old Claire Wineland, a young CF patient), barely health-oriented and embarrassingly self-referential. Circulation’s non-emergency health transportation for the 3.6 million Americans who miss medical appointments weekly due to lack of transport, beside a good idea, also had a pretty cool Mini Clubman on display. I left at the break in search of the previous two hours+ spent (at the end of a busy day in a busy week). Caveat emptor increasingly applies to events, yes?