Bayer 2019 G4A Partnerships now open for applications through 31 May

Alex Fair of Medstartr has alerted us to Bayer’s G4A Partnerships for their accelerator to develop and scale breakthrough solutions anchored in behavioral science. The program now covers 35 countries to collaborate with startups and healthcare technology companies that are developing innovative solutions in health and care.

Health areas include Cardiovascular, Digital Therapeutics, Global Health, Oncology, Ophthalmology, Pulmonology, Radiology and Women’s Health.

G4A has two tracks for companies based on development stage: 

Growth Track: for companies in the pre-product launch stage. Ideal candidates are seed-stage startups with a Minimal Viable Product validated through acquisition of patents and in publications. Funding is €50-100K to partner + co-create products and solutions with Bayer, plus co-working space in Berlin.

Advance Track: a mature company with a product in the market. Companies will be working jointly with Bayer experts to drive a commercial partnership, co-funded by G4A. There’s a €50-100K initial investment followed by incremental milestone-based payments.

Since 2013, G4A has supported over 150 digital health companies, resulting in 30 direct collaborations, the most recent award being in January: KinAptic (US), Agamon (Israel/UK), and Cyclica (Canada). To apply, see the Partnership page and click on Apply Now. Finalists will be notified in August for the formal announcement in Berlin in early October. But you have to move quickly. as it closes 31 May!

January’s Crazy Week: JP Morgan, StartUp Health, Health 2.0 WinterTech…and CES takes the cake!

This week is Crazy Week for healthcare and technology folk, with multiple major events centered in San Francisco and Las Vegas.

JP Morgan’s 36th annual healthcare conference started today 8 Jan through Thursday 11 Jan in San Francisco. It annually hosts 450 companies presenting to 9,000 attendees. It attracts hundreds of investors and is A Very Big Deal for both investors and companies angling for same. It kicked off with Medtronic‘s Omar Ishrak touting their success with Tyrx, an anti-microbial resorbable envelope for their cardiac devices to prevent post-surgical infection. In value-based care, it may not be in itself reimbursable, but improves outcomes (MedCityNews). The official hashtag for the conference is #JPMHC18 but there’s also #JPM18.

Of interest to Readers will be Teladoc’s presentation at JPM, provided by Seeking Alpha

CNBC’s tip sheet on the action. Genalyte‘s lab-on-a-chip demos their blood sampling in 15 minutes technique to MedCityNews writer. And Vive La Biotech–why American investors should be looking at French companies.

Within the event is the invite-only StartUp Health Festival Monday and Tuesday which hashtags at #startuphealth. Separately, but with many of the usual suspects, is Health 2.0’s one-day WinterTech conference in San Francisco the following day on Wednesday 10 Jan, also with an investment focus. (You can imagine the investor and company hopping between conference locations!) Alex Fair is also leading a Meetup tweetup for the week–more information here. You may also want to check out #pinksockspinksocks is an ad hoc group dedicated to health and wellness innovation and doctor-patient connectedness.

Further south, the sprawl of Las Vegas has been taken over by the sprawl of CES (aptly dubbed ‘Whoa!’) starting Tuesday 9 Jan through Friday 12 Jan. The substantial health tech focus (more…)

#MedMo16: finalists, winners, and what they tell us about the state of health tech

[grow_thumb image=”http://telecareaware.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/MedStartr_red_grey_sm.jpg” thumb_width=”125″ /]Having attended two conferences in the past two weeks, and squinting to read the tea leaves in the cup, there are some trends that this Editor is picking up. They are quite different from what has been seen over the past year or two. They’ll be expanded on in articles to follow. From the top:

  • Successful companies fit into a bigger picture. Startups into early-stage companies, which were the focus at #MedMo16, are now playing the niches like genetics, patient-focused discovery, condition management and cost-effective specialized clinical innovations.
  • Anything that simplifies a process and saves money is attractive. Complex ‘big data’, analytics and ‘population health/integration’ solutions aren’t in the lead anymore because there are a lot of them and they all look alike.
  • Nothing is revolutionary. The idea that an app, device or software will ‘revolutionize healthcare as we know it’ is now recognized as absurd. (The cocktail/drinks party is ovah!) Cases must be proved first, usually on your self-funded or FFF (families, friends and fools) dime, if you want to partner with the Big Dogs.
  • Value-based care, this year’s darling, is already being seen as a vague ‘catch-all’ in a way that Triple Aim and ‘outcomes/evidence-based care’ were eventually found to be. As a meme, it’s turning out to have the life of a fruit fly.
  • It has to be easy to access, preferably on something the average patient or clinician already has or can acquire easily, like a laptop, tablet or smartphone. The idea of having to place a special purpose-built device in, let’s say, a home, is looking more and more ‘analogue’ indeed, a trend we are seeing in the traditional hub-based telehealth market and even slowly in telecare and traditional PERS.
  • Funding models are changing, with more bootstrapping, self-funding, expand you go and less emphasis on big investment and selling out fast. As funders on a NYeC DHC panel pointed out last Wednesday, don’t raise more – or less – than you need.

At #MedMo16, Crowd Challenge participants were judged by a combination of the interested MedStartr/Health 2.0 NYC community through the MedStartr funding platform, and then by a panel of judges who have leading clinical, technological, patient advocate and funding experience. In short, a group that has seen a lot over the past decade plus, has been up and down the Hype Cycle, and is down to Brass Tacks.

The innovations that bubbled up through the finalists (more…)

A ‘desperate’ call for healthcare innovation creates a stir

When you are trying to shake things up in healthcare, sometimes enthusiasm gets mistaken for desperation.

Alex Fair is known to many of our American Readers as one of the Grizzled Pioneers of what eventually became known as Health 2.0. He’s head of a Meetup group in NYC with close to 5,000 members (Health 2.0 NYC, for which this Editor was an event organizer/producer for over a year), founder of health innovation-only crowdfunding platform Medstartr (see ‘Websites We Like’), a successful health tech event producer (MedMomentum 16 coming up 1-2 December) and a few other things in between. In short, Alex Hustles For The Cause.

One of his projects is the Major Depressive Disorder (MDD)/Depression Care Innovation Challenge with Takeda, which closed for applications last Monday. There was a last flurry of promotion via personal notes in social media and emails which is standard–well-known in style for those of us on Alex’s lists. But sometimes enthusiasm gets misinterpreted.

So a funny thing happened to me yesterday on Twitter. Someone told us that we sounded “desperate” in our tweets and posts. At first, my lizard brain said “what, I don’t want to be seen as desperate!” as if I was trying to get a date for the Junior Prom (which I did, thank you very much.) But then my mission-driven, we-have-got-to-fix-this-NOW-so-more-people-like-Jess_Jacobs-Live-longer-and-better-lives brain fired up and said, “Damn Right I’m Desperate!” The fact is that if we want to move the needle on innovation, we need to do something about it and desperate times DO call for desperate measures.

Read all about it here. If you want to change healthcare, especially in the US, you might get a little frustrated! (P.S. Along with the controversy is a calendar of upcoming NYC health tech events).

Medstartr Momentum 2015: did you miss it? (Video)

Let’s go to the video. Monday’s Medstartr Momentum/Health 2.0 NYC event was a Broadway Showstopper at Microsoft’s NYC Tech Center. Now available is a (so far) uncut video on medstartr.tv (scroll down to 11/30). There’s no play/skip bar on this, only a pause, so you may want to investigate a linked Health 2.0 NYC Livestream video page which has segmented the sessions and these have a play/skip bar.

Speakers included Susannah Fox, the CTO of HHS as well as 24 panelists, and 5 Momentum Talks representing Patients (Regina Holliday) Providers (Cheryl Pegus, NYU), Partners (Amy Cueva, MAD*POW), Institutions (Wen Dombrowski, MD, Northwell), and investors (Peter Frishauf.) There were four pitch sessions through the day featuring early-stage companies organized around Wearable Health Tech, Hospitals 2.0 and Pharma Tech 2.0. Hat tip to founder Alex Fair, his team, Steve Greene and the 15 sponsors who made it happen. TTA is a long-time media sponsor of Health 2.0 NYC.