TTA Fall Follies Week 4: Kaiser/Best Buy, medical app review revival, Alcuris and Spark DPS, and the ethics of contact tracing and trackers for senior care

 

Our news roundup was quite busy this week with Kaiser extending its Medicare partnership with Best Buy’s Lively Mobile Plus. Review and approval of medical apps are revived in both the US and Germany. In the UK, Alcuris becomes a supplier to a DPS and Propel@YH brings in its 2020 cohort. For weekend reading, the ethics of contact tracing and ADL/safety trackers in senior care.

News roundup: Kaiser/Best Buy Lively partners; Teladoc’s mental telehealth, Livongo execs depart; approved apps make comeback in US, DE; United Airlines tests COVID CommonPass for international flying
Weekend reading: contact tracing in assisted living/LTC facilities via sensor-based ADL technology raises ethical issues (Older people value privacy too)
Alcuris appointed as supplier to Spark DPS (UK) (Innovation gains foothold in contracting)
Propel@YH digital health accelerator announces 2020 cohort of 10 companies (Bringing global digital health to Yorkshire & Humber)

Mostly a ‘redux’ of a week, with Doro acquiring another company, Teladoc suing Amwell, and Theranos’ judge telling them that nothing the defense threw at the wall stuck. Tunstall reminds us that the most vulnerable are at risk during the winter–you should too. And if you are seeking a sales manager position, see our UK highlights article–Buddi is hiring.

UK highlights: Doro acquires Connexus Careline, Tunstall warns on winter isolation and disconnected care, Buddi seeks Sales Account Manager  (Doro increases its second position, and happy to see more hiring!)
Teladoc sues Amwell on patent infringement–again (This time, much larger companies go head to head, creating bountiful Christmas bonuses for their lawyers)
The Theranos Story, ch. 67: the Holmes/Balwani indictments stay, Holmes’ defense strategy fails (Waiting for the Twinkie Defense II, or the money running out)

Leaves have started to turn and fall, but digital health just keeps rising with $9.4 bn in investment this year. Tunstall UK and Group Holdings report their financial status and preview their new ownership. And la scandale Theranos continues with a revelation of defense strategy.

Digital health investment smashes the ceiling: $9.4 bn invested through 3rd Q (It’s Bubble City!)
The Theranos Story, ch. 66: Walgreens and Safeway aren’t investors, they’re business partners! (Holmes’ defense strategy–erode her most serious charges)
Tunstall Healthcare (UK) and Group Holdings’ 2019 year end reports filed: highlights (The state of the company and a preview of new ownership) 

We open October with the US DOJ’s blockbuster indictments of multiple ‘telemedicine’ companies reaping billions in fraudulent payments. Sweden’s Doro continues its acquisition tear with Victrix, adding data analytics and proactive intervention capability to monitoring. Clinical trials are another coronavirus casualty–but RPM and telehealth may be able to help.

DOJ ‘takedown’ charges 86 defendants with $4.5 bn in fraudulent telemedicine claims in largest ever action (‘Telemedicine’ enters the big leagues of Medicare fraud for DME, tests, and drugs)
COVID-19’s negative impact on clinical trials–can remote patient monitoring and telehealth companies help? (Arkivum’s extensive study has implications)
Doro adds Spain’s Victrix SocSan to its growing brand portfolio for £1.28 million plus shares (A small but big move in Doro’s data analytics capabilities)

It’s summer’s last weekend, and we leave a Summer Like No Other bracketed by Amwell’s blockbuster IPO and Thank and Praise’s book on the early pandemic. Plenty of telehealth related reading with two reports from the Taskforce on Telehealth Policy and the UK TECS study. Walmart’s place in the Clinic Wars and a sensor-based fall detection system from Israel debuts. And the latest chapter in la scandale Theranos is la Holmes’ mental status.

News roundup: Amwell’s socko IPO raises $742M, Walmart and the Clinic Wars, Taskforce on Telehealth Policy report released, Israel’s Essence releases fall detection sensor system
Public Policy Projects, Tunstall UK release joint TECS study finding growth during pandemic, recommendations
The Theranos Story, ch. 65: Elizabeth Holmes’ “mental disease or defect” defense revealed (Stock up on popcorn and Twinkies)
The book of ‘Thank and Praise’ with a selection of their 1,000 messages (UK) (Thanking those who helped others)

Getting close to the unofficial end of summer in a year like no other (unless you count 1919?). We catch up with news and ISfTeH, Amwell finally IPOs with a Google kicker, Theranos’ denouement moves to 2021, and payer Humana sues a scam masquerading as a telehealth company. And we profile a movie project which will engage people on dementia.

Connected Health Summit 1-3 September (virtual): last days to register–50% off for TTA Readers! (see above)
Is the NHS ready to adopt telemedicine through and through–and is telemedicine ready? (COVID revealed the need, now for getting to the goal)
News roundup: CVS cashing out notes, catching up with ISfTeH, India’s Stasis Labs RPM enters US, Propeller inhaler with Novartis Japan, Cerner gets going with VA
QuivvyTech: a ‘telehealth’ company, sued by Humana in telemarketing scheme (US)
(An apparent scam with telehealth ‘lipstick’)
The Theranos Story, ch. 64: Holmes’ trial moved to March 2021 (Lady Justice is crying with boredom under that blindfold)
Amwell plans $100 million IPO, plus $100 million from Google as a kickoff (As predicted, but surprisingly modest in scope)
‘Before the Ashes Fall’: the story behind the book and the movie in development about dementia (Funding needed)

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Weekend reading: contact tracing in assisted living/LTC facilities via sensor-based ADL technology raises ethical issues

Contact tracing for COVID-19 is still ‘not quite there’ in many countries, especially those countries like the UK which had created centralized models and were slow to move to the decentralized systems based on Apple and Google’s APIs, the (Gapple? AppGoo?) Exposure Notification system now in use in Ireland and Germany. For the most vulnerable in assisted living, who aren’t using smartphones that ping adjacency to other smartphones and are moving around most of the time within the residence, other approaches have been developed. Already in place in many communities are sensor-based trackers for activities of daily living (ADLs) for both safety and predictive health analytics, as well as provide conveniences such as apartment entry for residents.

As we noted in July, a number of ADL and location trackers have repurposed themselves into highly accurate contact tracers since they retain the history of resident and staff movement. Profiled are CarePredict (ADLs), ZulaFly (location tracking), and CenTrak (location tracking). Residents in many facilities with these systems are early adopters of contact tracing, even if they don’t know it.

While the article is detailed and fairly laudatory about how these systems can assist residents and staff in arresting the spread of COVID-19 which has ripped through nursing homes and senior living, it then diverges into other issues, some worth considering even if some of the verbiage is over the top:

  • These location monitoring systems haven’t been used for infectious disease outbreaks before, but the article admits that the pandemic has presented extraordinary circumstances
  • Use of these systems cannot substitute for effective infection control: staff and resident handwashing, mask wearing, and staff PPE. (Something like wearing a used mask and not washing your hands for the rest of us)
  • These systems are dependent on facility-wide internet/Wi-Fi. Many LTCPAC facilities do not have it, thus creating a digital divide in care even in residences proven to have high-quality care.
  • Resident rights and privacy. Residents apparently have only limited choices in using these technologies, even if they are restricted to their rooms. Not all see the need for monitoring technology for their safety and intrusive ‘alarms’ that bring in staff. There is a real issue around older adults’ autonomy and privacy rights which tends to be forgotten in the balance of privacy and safety, with prediction of illness based on behavior a step further.

Interviewed for this article, Laurie Orlov of Aging in Place Technology Watch, believes “It’s pretty darn useful if you’re in independent living, and you decide to go for a walk. If it’s night, and there’s ice, having a full detection capability that knows where you are is really useful. I think with fall detection, and anything that can help when you’re alone, the benefits exceed the cost of the privacy — assuming that you’re with it enough to opt in.”  Senior Sensors (The Verge)  (Disclosure: Editor Donna consulted for CarePredict in 2017-18)

A counterpoint to this article is also by Laurie Orlov and published on her website, reviewing the future of remote care technology and older adults in 2020. It’s a preview of a to-be-released later this year report.

65+ smartphone ownership is up to 42 percent–but slumps with increased age

[grow_thumb image=”http://telecareaware.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/elderly-smartphone.jpg” thumb_width=”150″ /]A report of progress in smartphone ownership by those over 65 years of age is mixed indeed. There’s progress–ownership is up to 42 percent of the age group, and 64 percent of these smartphone owners are users of the Internet according to Pew Research‘s 2016 study. But mitigating factors to this good news is that ownership is very much a function of income and age. According to the US Census’ American Community Survey 2015, 66 percent of those aged 65+ households with income $70,000+ own smartphones, but that declines to 33 percent in the 75+ age range and 27 percent of those 80+. Perhaps Laurie Orlov exaggerates the cost of smartphones, especially Android–this Editor has never bought an LG phone over $200 and has a miserly data plan, using Wi-Fi most of the time; Verizon has plenty of new older models at lighter prices and other carriers like Consumer Cellular and GreatCall have excellent deals. But what is true is that interest wanes with age–and that phones, especially Apple, still present legibility and usability barriers to those with low vision or hand arthritis. Ms Orlov also notes Pew’s discovery that 65+ users are less likely to secure their phones with lock codes and regularly update their apps. Aging in Place Technology Watch