More reflections on, significance of the Theranos quagmire (updated)

click to enlargeTheranos’ spin towards the Auger In continues. Truth or Consequences are apparent. So are setbacks.

Wired has put together a timeline of the key events in The 9 Events That Have Pretty Much Doomed Theranos, most of which our Readers in following our coverage (index here from 2013) are already familiar with. One interesting point is #7, which touches on another gift to the legal profession–the class action lawsuit. Eight lawsuits are already in process, and at least one names former partner Walgreens Boots.

SEC and DOJ’s interest. The SEC, limited in its action because Theranos got big without going public (see below for more), is likely seeking misrepresentation of technology to investors–as in, ‘it really didn’t work’. Penalties may include repayment or settlements to investors and barring principals from ever leading a public company. The DOJ will likely focus on consumer impact. Knowing that your blood tests are inaccurate but continuing to sell them violates all sorts of Federal health regulations, and can earn the principals orange mock turtlenecks and a long stay in a place with iron bars, pesky regulations and no choice of wardrobe. Sadly, Theranos’ legal counsel and board member David Boies won’t have a chance to unleash one of his favorite intimidation weapons, the libel lawsuit. Instead, he’ll be uncomfortably playing defense (but for how long?) Give the man a crying towel, and remind him to bill in advance. Wired (from April)

*Updated: Here’s the CMS letter, courtesy of the WSJ. (If John Carreyrou doesn’t receive a Pulitzer Prize, the fix is in!–Ed.)

The market demonstrated inefficiency in allowing companies like Theranos to get big without going public. You cannot short or sell the stock (a negative ‘opinion’) which demonstrates that investor-backed Unicorns represent ‘incomplete markets,’ according to Robert Shiller’s Efficient Markets Hypothesis. Of course, before going public, the SEC would have demanded disclosure–another reason why Theranos (and possibly other Unicorns) aren’t. Forbes.

‘Theranos has probably set back the tremendously promising field of microfluidics by a decade.’ An investor who was rooting for Theranos (but didn’t invest) recounts the dodgy behavior of entrepreneurs from eToys.com to Tesla. ‘Hype is what entrepreneurs do best’; fabbed-up PowerPoint decks are par for the course. “Sadly, the journey from charisma to coercion to lying is quick and often complete.” Ms Holmes, you have a lot of company. When Startups Put The Fab in Fabricate. (WSJ; if paywalled, PDF attached)

Where do we go from here? We’ll close with advice to startups in biotech and medical innovation: pace thyself, know thyself. What’s needed: an internal culture amenable to science–and external regulation–and knowing when to apply the brakes to prevent slamming into The Wall Marked Failure. (Mentioned is a useful tool called a pre-mortem) Wired

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Comments

  1. Shama Hussain

    1. Punish Elizabeth Holmes, she needs to be sentenced for a few years. Get every cent of the investments back from her and her fan club, she has polluted and created a bad name for other entrepreneurs.
    2. yes there are many cons born to fix the healthcare offerings and these are the people who were responsible for polluting the environment. Investors need to do a thorough job of discipline and completing background checks.
    3. There are some great innovative ideas in the works, vision set by healthcare accomplished personnel with great experience in the industry and the know how but they are over looked when dames like Thomson come in the picture and work with the brains of investors. Maybe these investors make their decision over martini luncheons?
    4. The whole healthcare ecosystem needs innovative ideas. The entire industry is obsolete with lifers who have not seen daylight. They exist in the government, in hospitals and all networks; it needs an over haul and it can be done only with integrity and honesty mindsets. Eliminate e fraud and lack of integrity.

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