The King’s Fund Digital Health & Care Congress coming up fast! (London)

11-12 July, The King’s Fund, London W1G 0AN

Make your plans, if you have not already, to attend The King’s Fund’s annual Digital Health meeting in London. NHS England’s “Next steps on the five year forward view” outlines the plan to harness technology and innovation over the next two years. But what’s really happening on the ground? Tuesday features seven breakout sessions, a drinks reception, and speakers ranging from Rob Shaw, Interim Chief Executive, NHS Digital to Sarah Thew, Innovation and User Experience Manager, Greater Manchester Academic Health Science Network. Day 2 on Wednesday features an interactive panel discussion on NHS Test Beds, which are evaluating the real-world impact of new technologies, a breakfast workshop on integrating technology with care in Greater Bristol and eight more breakouts that cover everything from interoperability to self-care and patient engagement. The content is wide-ranging, fresh, and different. There’s also plenty of opportunities to network and also to see new technologies in the exhibition area. For more information and to register, click on the sidebar advert at right or here. #kfdigital17, @TheKingsFund  TTA is pleased to be for another year a marketing supporter of the Digital Health conference.

If you can’t wait–The King’s Fund is also hosting a full-day event on 22 June on the challenge facing adult social care on achieving more with fewer resources, including technology. For more information and to register, click here.

Some London events and an opportunity to monetise your expertise

To respond to a recent contract Our Mobile Health needs to expand its pool of paid expert app reviewers. Applicants should be proficient health app users, professionally qualified, articulate and able to assess academic papers that justify app effectiveness.  Reviews are done remotely (though reviewers must use the English version of apps) and offer an opportunity for reviewers to position themselves as digital health pioneers. Apply here.

Also, if you’re free in London, here are some events you may wish to consider:

Midsummer’s DHACA Day is at the Digital Catapult Centre, Euston Road, London on  21st June. It is aimed very much at digital health developers, with presentations on IP, new business opportunities, the new medical devices and data protection legislation and much more. DHACA membership remains free; entry to the event, which starts at 10 am for 10.30 am, is just the cost of lunch. Book here.

NICE is launching a new evidence tool for “medtech product developers” on 3rd July at the Royal Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, 27 Sussex Place, London. Attendance is free though expect it to sell out soon! Book here.

The next Health Technology Forum meeting near Bank tube in London is on 5th July at 6.15 pm for 6.30 pm, starting with Giovanna Forte’s epic story of how to sell to the NHS – it’s really not to be missed! There’s also an important digital health dimension as she is looking for a partner to develop her innovation into an integrated service. This is followed by a talk on using digital health to provide acute paediatric care remotely. It’s free to attend though, if you book here, do please come along as otherwise it messes up our host Baker Botts’ kind and generous hospitality arrangements.

(Disclosure: this editor has an involvement in the majority of the above.)

 

UK Telehealthcare’s West Yorkshire TECS MarketPlace event 4 July, plus

July 4, at CAIR UK Ltd., Hanson Lane, Halifax, West Yorkshire HX1 4SD

Our supporter UK Telehealthcare‘s next TECS MarketPlace is moving up to West Yorkshire and hosted by CAIR UK at their headquarters. Approximately 35 industry leading Technology Enabled Care Services (TECS) suppliers and providers will exhibit their solutions. The day will also include exclusive behind the scenes tours of CAIR’s state of the art manufacturing facilities. The event is free to attend for all local authority and housing association representatives. More information is in the PDF attached, and register here on the UKTHC website

Monday 26 June also kicks off Telehealthcare Awareness Week. Another associated event is Health + Care in London 28-29 June where UK Telehealthcare is a partner. More information on the event including bursaries for members is on their News & Events page (scroll down).

Upcoming MarketPlaces:

  • 4th October 2017 – London MarketPlace, Barnet & Southgate College, High St. London N14 6BS
  • 23rd November 2017 – Bristol MarketPlace, Bristol City Hall, College Green, Bristol BS1 5TR

MarketPlaces in Luton, Nottingham, and Dudley are planned for 2017/18.

HealthIMPACT East Monday 5 June (NYC)

HealthIMPACT East
Monday, 5 June, Union League Club, New York, NY

The HealthIMPACT series of mainly single-day events on health tech/HIT’s effect on healthcare now covers several major cities in the US. What this Editor likes about them is that they compress a great deal of information in a single day, with well-presented, relaxed panel discussions with top executives and figures in the industry. They are also held in interesting venues like the Union League Club in NYC. HealthIMPACT East is co-produced with NODE Health. This fifth annual meeting will focus on evidence-based digital health, healthcare innovations, cybersecurity, and how to achieve value-based care. Speakers are from academic and provider organizations like Yale University, Jefferson Health, Mount Sinai, Northwell Health, PCHAlliance, New York-Presbyterian, NJIT, and Partnership Fund for NYC, Panels are being hosted this year by former colleagues from Health 2.0 NYC Megan Antonelli of Purpose Events and “The Healthcare IT Guy” Shahid Shah. It’s not too late to register for this full day, including breakfast, lunch, and cocktail reception, here. TTA is a media partner for HealthIMPACT East.

Digital health & insurance: perfect partners?

The BMA is claiming at their annual conference today that GPs are struggling with workload. Once upon a time, everyone thought digital health alone was one answer to reduce that workload. However until we have better algorithms to sort the signal from the noise, many doctors claim that more data is contributing to the problem rather than solving it. So how to get patients to use digital health data to take more responsibility for their own health? In technical terms, how to raise their patient activation measure (PAM)?

One way of improving the effectiveness of digital health might therefore be to add incentives to become more activated; insurance could provide such an incentive. The Royal Society of Medicine has therefore put together, as a ‘first’, an event on 1st June to explore this combination (disclosure: organised by this editor).

The speakers have been chosen to cover the full spectrum of participants in this field. Beginning with the software, Caty Ebel Bitoun from the Netherlands will describe software she builds to support health insurers, and Justin Lawler from We Savvy in Ireland will describe how that software can be configured to deliver maximum benefit.

Guy Gross will explain how careful segmentation of insured populations by PAMs can substantially reduce (more…)

International Conference on Rural and Elderly Health Informatics (Togo, W. Africa)

click to enlarge14-17 December, University of Lomé, Togo, West Africa

The IREHI conference is an annual international conference organized by IEEE International and the University of Lomé. The first meeting will be in Togo and will concentrate on the crisis of care delivery in developing countries, particularly acute in rural areas. The conference will look at how information and communication technologies (ICT), including telehealth and distance care, can improve healthcare. These solutions could significantly contribute to the improvement of health education, diagnosis of diseases, the effectiveness of treatment and monitoring of the elderly, both in urban and rural areas where specialized services are still limited or sometimes non-existent. (more…)

Successful Aging 2030: how far we haven’t come, how far we have to go

click to enlargeThis Editor attended last Wednesday’s (10 May) d.Health Summit 2017–Successful Aging 2030, sponsored by the University of Rochester and West Health. It was an expansive, well-organized and attended seminar at the New York Academy of Sciences at the impressive new 7 World Trade Center. Panels covered economic, housing, health outcomes, government policy, technology innovation, and investing factors key to one central fact: that in the US, nearly 20 percent of the population will be over 65 by 2030. Worldwide, the numbers are already much higher as of 2015: Japan (26 percent), Italy (22), Greece, Germany, Portugal (21) with nearly all of Europe already near that magic number (World Bank).

What was dispiriting to this Editor was that in her now 11 years in related health tech (telehealth and telecare), the status of many issues were the same as in 2006. The inadequacy of ‘aging in place’ supports and “assisted living”; a culture that brutally devalues people as they get older starting after 50; a belief that whiz-bang technology will fix it, but it doesn’t; the non-recognition of ‘aging-consumer-driven healthcare’; the lack of attention from investors because aging is not glamorous–are still there. What was hopeful? The candid recognition of these factors and the open discussion around them. There was a blunt admission expressed somewhat differently by two speakers, June Fisher MD of UC Berkeley and Charlotte Yeh of AARP, that without co-designing solutions with older people, we will get nowhere, and that imposing ‘fixes’ from the outside hasn’t and isn’t going to work. We also have a new middle age of 55-75, but the work market and employers have not adapted to that lengthening of productiveness, with the ‘pasture’ of retirement still pegged theoretically at 65.

Highlights of each panel:

The Longevity Economy, or the Silver Economy, was estimated by Merrill Lynch‘s Surya Kolluri at $7 trillion, with a surprising 90 percent of package goods spending done by 65+, and not just that but also areas such as home improvement. But healthcare spending is about 200 percent over the population average, and caregiving factors into that as well. There are profit opportunities for companies in this market, including developing/future areas such as robotics. (more…)

The stop-start of health tech in the NHS continues (UK)

Continuing their critique of the state of technology within the NHS [TTA 17 Feb], The King’s Fund’s Harry Evans examines the current state of incipient ‘rigor mortis’ (his term). Due to the upcoming election, the Department of Health is delaying its response to Dame Fiona Caldicott, the National Data Guardian for Health and Care (NDG), on her review of data security, consent and opt-outs (Gov.UK publications).

People have significant trust and privacy concerns about their data, which led to NHS England suspending care.data over three years ago. But with safeguards in place, public polling supports the sharing of health data for uses such as research and direct care. But…there’s more. Now there is ‘algorithmic accountability’, which may single out individuals and influence their care, much as algorithms dictate what online ads we’re served. What of the patient data being served to Google DeepMind, IBM Watson Health, and Vitalpac for AI development? Have people adjusted their concerns, and have systems evolved to better store, secure, and share data? And how can this be implemented at the local NHS level? The NHS and technology: turn it off and on again Hat tip to Susanne Woodman of BRE.

A reminder that The King’s Fund’s Digital Health and Care Congress is on 11-12 July. Click on the sidebar to go directly to information and to register. Preview video; the Digital Health Congress fact sheet includes information on sponsoring or exhibiting. To make the event more accessible, there are new reduced rates for groups and students, plus bursary spots available for patients and carers. TTA is again a media partner of the Digital Health and Care Congress 2017. Updates on Twitter @kfdigital17

Two London events worth considering

A quick blog to draw your attention to two events at the Royal Society of Medicine that this editor has been involved in setting up, and that should be of interest.

The first is the Future of Medicine: the Doctor’s Role in 2027, on May 18th, which has a host of excellent speakers looking at how technology is likely to change the way medicine is practised in ten year’s time, to help clinicians, healthcare managers, academics and suppliers prepare for those changes to ensure maximum improvement in patient outcomes. Book here

The second event, in partnership with the IET, Digital Health and Insurance: a Perfect Partnership? on June 1st brings in a wide range of international speakers to explore how, by giving insurers precision over the risks they are taking, digital health is transforming health insurance, both for humans and for pets, and in the process may well result in a fundamentally different way of providing, and paying for, health in the future. Not to be missed! Book here.

As has been said before, the RSM has medical education as one of its charitable objects (the other is promoting medical advances) so their events are extremely attractively priced.

ATA 2017: Telehealth 2.0 annual President’s Awards

This year’s ATA 2017 President’s Awards, each honoring a company or individual, are:

President’s Award for the Transformation of Health Delivery (supported by Cerner): New York-Presbyterian OnDemand

NYP OnDemand has five services in its app which delivers services from Weill Cornell, NYP, and ColumbiaDoctors: Second Opinion, Urgent Care, Virtual Visit (telemedicine), Express Care (if you’re already in the ER, a virtual visit may shorten wait time), and Inter-Hospital Consult (a collaboration tool within the NYP network). At a recent Health 2.0 NYC Hospital Innovation Programs meeting, Jonathan Gordon (director of NYP Ventures) and Graeme Ossey (innovation manager) discussed its development (see video here, starting at 18:06, about 15 minutes).

Innovation in Remote Healthcare (supported by InTouch Health): Tyto Care

Tyto Care’s portable diagnostic device includes an FDA Class II cleared digital stethoscope, a digital imaging otoscope for ear exams, a throat scope, a skin camera and thermometer swipe. The Tyto home device includes video guidance instructions as part of the smartphone or tablet platform and connects to an online platform to send the information, either in real time or store-and-forward, to a primary care physician the user selects. Currently, they are working with American Well [TTA 2 Dec] and announced in the past month partnerships with Miami Children’s Health System and Allied Physicians Group, a 35-location pediatrics and specialty group headquartered in Melville, NY.

Other awards were: (more…)

ATA 2017 dispatch: Devices and doom

click to enlargeBruce Judson, our guest ATA 2017/Telehealth 2.0 reporter, is a bestselling author of books on business and technology issues in the evolving digital era. This is the third and final article this week he’s written from the ATA floor. Mr. Judson writes frequently for The Huffington Post. More on about him may be found in our review of his critique of the RAND telehealth study [25 Mar].

This Editor agrees with his POV that drowning doctors in more and more data, whether previously accessible or not, isn’t a way forward to a successful business model. The current data is overwhelming–and not interoperable with EHRs. More and more data, looking for a home….

Orlando, April 26. Yesterday, I set aside several hours to walk by the booths of the 200+ exhibitors at the ATA show. As I slowly walked the Exhibit Hall, I was struck by the large number of in-home telehealth patient monitoring devices. (Names are omitted to protect the innocent.)

Colleagues had similar reactions. When I asked about exhibitors, the most common response was “I had no idea there were so many new telehealth monitoring devices that are FDA approved or in the process of obtaining approval.”

As I wandered from booth to booth, I was also struck by the failure of so many, if not most, monitoring device manufacturers to focus on the practical uses of their truly revolutionary technologies. At each monitoring device booth, I asked the same question, “How will the data be used?”  All too often, the answer was, “We provide daily patient data for physicians that have never been accessible before, and doctors receive daily graphs.”

My follow-up questions were always, “You believe busy doctors will look at data on their large patient population each day? Why don’t you provide alerts?” Again, there was a frequent answer, which was some variation of “Yes, now doctors can see daily events which will lead to extraordinary improvements in health outcomes, and we don’t want to create alert fatigue” (false positives that suggest a problem where one does not exist).

In my view, monitoring devices without suites of robust predictive analytics will fail. Doctors are already too busy, and anything that adds to their workload is immediately suspect. Moreover, we still live in a fee for service world, and now we are talking about new, uncompensated work.

As Jonathan Linkous said to me on the first day of the ATA show, “the technology is a tool to provide the service,” not the service itself. Patient monitoring device firms must realize they are offering a service. To succeed, their services must provide actionable analysis, not more and more data. If alerts are ready for prime time, then doctors will value the devices: They can rely on the associated algorithms to indicate when an intervention (also to be compensated) is needed.

Moreover, I strongly suspect doctors would prefer a few false alerts, with algorithms biased toward safety and results that can be quickly checked via the underlying data, as compared to wading through charts looking for anomalies.

A fundamental question for anyone is “what business are you really in?” To succeed, many of the ATA exhibitors need to reorient themselves from the business of providing great technology to the business of providing great service enabled by technology.

Mr. Judson’s first article, a discussion with ATA’s Jonathan Linkous on business models for telehealth is here. The second article on Mercy Health’s catalyzing telehealth innovation at the hospital level is here.

ATA2017 dispatch: Catalyzing telehealth innovation in hospitals

Bruce Judson, our guest ATA 2017/Telehealth 2.0 reporter, is a bestselling author of books on business and technology issues in the evolving digital era. This is the second article this week from the ATA floor. Mr. Judson writes frequently for The Huffington Post. More on about him may be found in our review of his critique of the RAND telehealth study [25 Mar]. His discussion with ATA’s Jonathan Linkous on business models for telehealth is here.

Orlando, April 25. At the ATA show, I stopped at Mercy’s booth, and spoke with Keela Davis, who is Mercy’s Executive Director, Innovation and Product Development. In the booth, was a large, inspirational display of Mercy Virtual’s high-tech, widely-reported $54 millionhospital without beds.” The facility is the nerve center for Mercy Virtual’s telemedicine programs, which include TeleICU (remote monitoring of ICUs by Mercy specialists) as well as multiple other remote services for patients in hospitals and at home.

A great deal has been written about Mercy’s groundbreaking service and large investment in this facility. I asked Davis what led to the decision to build “the hospital without beds.” She said that first, a lot of experience in telehealth proceeded the investment decision. Undoubtedly this experience was required to simply decide what should be built in a facility designed for the technology that exists today and that will undoubtedly accommodate new technologies as they arise. Second, she also said, that it reflected “a visionary” decision on the part of Mercy’s leadership to make this commitment. Now, in her words, the facility has become “a symbol of our work.”

As a student of innovation, our discussion was notable on several fronts:

First, Davis noted that now that the facility exists it serves as a catalyst for innovation. Mercy is actively considering, as might be expected, a range of new telehealth services. While Davis was quick to point out that the facility was not the only source of telehealth innovation at Mercy, she did indicate it’s the hub for innovative ideas and discussions. Organizations build on their experience, their successes, and the demonstrated commitment of management to move forward with good ideas. Mercy’s facility now provides the tangible place that facilitates ongoing growth. In short, after conquering the first level of innovation, Mercy is poised to march forward with new, groundbreaking services.

Mercy’s facility is also a warning to organizations that see the telehealth future, but hesitate to act. As Mercy gains experience, it will have a team that understands the many, complex aspects of assessing and bringing new services to market. Plus, many of the underlying capital and investment requirements associated with creating these services have already happened. In short, it will soon be difficult for other healthcare entities eyeing services in the same arenas to match Mercy’s innovation machine.

ATA 2017 dispatch: The future is about business models and the consumer

Bruce Judson, our guest ATA 2017/Telehealth 2.0 reporter, is a bestselling author of books on business and technology issues in the evolving digital era. This is the first of several articles this week. Mr. Judson writes frequently for The Huffington Post. More on about him may be found in our review of his critique of the RAND telehealth study [25 Mar].

Orlando, April 24. Yesterday, the annual convention of the American Telemedicine Association (ATA) moved into full swing. At noon, Jonathan Linkous, ATA’s CEO, took a few minutes to talk with me. During our wide-ranging discussion, three notable themes emerged:

First and perhaps most important, Mr. Linkous believes that the future development of telehealth now stands with establishing viable business models. In his view, the speed of growth of the industry now depends on how the many participants in the healthcare system develop business models that lead to appropriate investments. He noted that this contrasts with the general focus on the evolving technology. Of course, the technology will continue to evolve and major advancements will occur for the foreseeable future. But, Mr. Linkous strongly believes that “the technology is here today.” In short, it’s now about how the technology is used and deployed. New advances will be incorporated into services and infrastructure as they occur. But, the past, telehealth is now moving into mainstream investment discussions. In his view, the leaders of every health organization are now assessing the role telehealth will play in the services they offer, and the investments they need to make now.  Now, it’s about making it work. We are no longer waiting for the technology to be viable.

Second, Mr. Linkous commented on the hype surrounding the industry. He was frank in recognizing that, as with all exciting, transformative industries, the hype cycle is in full swing. One telling comment: “Unlike the past, the industry now has real revenues,” with rapidly growing businesses. In short, we may not be past the hype, but the industry is quickly moving to fulfill realistic expectations.

Finally, Mr. Linkous concluded that the future growth of the telehealth industry would largely depend on the consumer. He cited a variety of factors: the growth of value-based care, the emerging influence of millennials who are comfortable with technology, and the overall consumerization of medicine.

Many industry participants have described themselves to me as B2B businesses. Undoubtedly, they are. It’s hard to refute Linkous’s conclusion: Ultimately, the growth of the industry, like the evolution of healthcare itself, will depend on consumer choices.

MedStartr’s ¡Viva La Evolución! evolves on Wed 5 April (NYC)

click to enlargeAfter an intense and overflow attendance Hospital Innovation Programs Roundtable last Wednesday hosted by NYC’s largest urgent care, CityMD, and with eight speaker/panelists from Mount Sinai, NY-Presbyterian, Northwell, and Startup61/Melbourne Australia Health Accelerator, what could be better than doing it again in two weeks?

Wednesday 5 April’s MedStartr/Health 2.0 NYC presentation on healthcare’s evolution will be a little more relaxed with three panelists so far, but they are rare ‘gets’: Greg Downing, DO is the Executive Director of Innovation at the US Department of Health & Human Services (HHS), an institution much in the news with Federal changes in healthcare. Jay Parkinson, MD, MPH developed the first commercial cloud-based EHR, Hello Health, back in 2008 and founded his current telemedicine company, Sherpaa Health, five years ago. Rich Park, MD is both host and the founder-CEO of CityMD. All have different views of how healthcare is evolving, so it should be both an interesting and full evening. It begins at 6 and wraps up at 9pm, with plenty of networking time.

Tickets are $35. Advance reservations are required due to building security. Ticketing is being done through the Meetup Group Health 2.0 NYC here. If you are not a member, please email MedStartr directly at members@Medstartr.com.

Videos are now online for the 22 March Hospital Innovations program and 1 March’s Rise of the Healthy Machines (#RISE2017). The latter includes keynotes, panels, and the six pitches for the Challenge. December’s #MedMo16 is also online.

TTA is a MedStartr and Health 2.0 NYC supporter/media sponsor since 2010; Editor Donna is a host for this event and a MedStartr Mentor. Check the MedStartr page to find and fund some of the most interesting startup ideas in healthcare.

HealthIMPACT’s upcoming events for 2017 (US)

The HealthIMPACT series of mainly single-day events on health tech/HIT’s effect on healthcare now covers several major cities in the US. What this Editor likes about them is that they compress a great deal of information in a single day, with well-presented, relaxed panel discussions with top executives and figures in the industry. They are also held in interesting venues like the Union League Club in NYC. Panels are being hosted this year by former colleagues from Health 2.0 NYC Megan Antonelli of Purpose Events and “The Healthcare IT Guy” Shahid Shah, with new vice chair Mandi Bishop, a HIT entrepreneur who was a Challenge Competitor at #MedMo16. Here’s the HealthIMPACT schedule with links to the individual events:

HealthIMPACT Southwest
Texas Medical Innovation Center | TMCx
April 4th, 2017  Receive a 20% discount off registration–use HIEB2017

HealthIMPACT Southeast
Florida Hospital Innovation Lab, Werner Auditorium, Orlando, FL
May 4th, 2017

HealthIMPACT East
Union League Club, New York, NY
June 5th, 2017 (note that this is a new date, changed from the date on the website)

HealthIMPACT WISE/Women in Information Science Retreat
Sundance Mountain Resort, Sundance, UT
June 23-25, 2017

HealthIMPACT Midwest
Matter Health, Chicago, IL
September 14, 2017

HealthIMPACT West
San Francisco, CA, October 7, 2017

TTA is a media partner of HealthIMPACT for 2017.

Upcoming Royal Society of Medicine telehealth/health tech events (UK)

Events are blooming like daffodils in a long-awaited Spring! Here are two coming up, organized by the Royal Society of Medicine’s Telemedicine & eHealth Section. Both are full day programs held at the RSM’s offices at 1 Wimpole Street, London.

Medical apps: Mainstreaming innovation
Tuesday 4 April 2017, 9am to 5:10pm
CPD: 6 credits
Event link: www.rsm.ac.uk/events/TEH03
To discuss the regulation, the potential use and evaluation of the introduction of medical apps in a range of healthcare situations. This event is the fifth annual medical apps event run by the Section; the previous four have all been popular. The purpose of each one has been to educate forward-thinking clinicians in the benefits of using medical apps to improve patient outcomes and reduce costs. In view of the expectation that the NHS will have an mHealth assessment operation running by next April, this event will focus on mainstreaming the use of apps within the health and care services.

Digital health and insurance: A perfect partnership?
Thursday 1 June 2017, 9am to 5pm
CPD: 6 credits (applied for)
Event link: www.rsm.ac.uk/events/TEH04
This meeting will explore how digital health and insurance can be mutually beneficial by enabling insurance companies to get a better handle on the risk of their insureds. It will also explore whether these new business models might result in a new paradigm for delivering care more effectively, and to consider whether as a result the population as a whole might be better motivated to take greater responsibility for their own health and wellbeing.

More information, online learning opportunities and links on the RSM section page. (PDF).

This past week at the RSM was Tuesday’s (28 March) 28th Annual Easter Lecture given by Matthew Syed, a columnist for The Times and author of two acclaimed books, ‘Bounce’ and ‘Black Box Thinking’. He focused on the dynamics of a high-performance culture. Talent is significant but not enough. There is no substitute for a mindset that drives continuous improvement. Every marginal gain is vital and they build together to achieve performance excellence. Event link here.