Late summer and early autumn event updates: Save 20% on Connected Health Summit, SEHTA Health + Space, Lilley’s talk with Ali Parsa, PATH Summit, Connected Health Conference, HealthIMPACT

It’s always a little sad to realize that summer is winding down. Some (like your Editor) stretch the summer past Labor Day (the DMZ in the US) into early autumn, taking the philosophy that woolies are way too warm till November. Here are three substantial events on your calendar to look forward to. Here are eight:

Connected Health Summit, 28-30 August, San Diego–Readers Save 20%!

Parks Associates have offered our readers 20% off registration at ‘Connected Health, Independent Living and Engaging Consumers’, the fifth Connected Health Summit organized by Parks Associates. The conference will analyze the roles of connected health technologies and innovations in driving changes in consumer behaviors and business models. Lead speakers are from IBM Watson Health, Alarm.com, Uber Health, and Qualcomm Life. More information and registration here. As a preview, download their latest white papers:  Market Snapshot – Consumer Health Attitudes and IoT Home Living Features and Sleep Tech and IoT. #CONNHealth18

Healthcare and Space Funding Call Brief, 4 September, Cocoon Networks, 4 Christopher Street, London, EC2A 2BS, 10:00 – 13:00

Sponsored by SEHTA, The Knowledge Transfer Network, and MedCity, this will cover funding opportunities for converting innovation from the space sector, from exploration to satellite communications, to new solutions for the health sector and medical applications that improve NHS treatment and care. At this event attendees will hear about them plus have the opportunity to network with organizations from both the health and space sectors. This event is part of the MedTech London programme supported by the GLA. For further information, contact Clare Ansett, Head of Communications, SEHTA

Health Chat with Ali Parsa of Babylon Health, 10 September, The King’s Fund London

This Health Chat conducted by Roy Lilley of nhsmanagers.net promises to be eventful. “Has the tide turned in primary care? What effect might Babylon produce? Who are the beneficiaries? What is the future for the traditional primary care GP model?” Tickets are a modest £19.95 – £39.95 and are going quickly. Sponsored by UK HealthGateway, the publishers of nhsmanagers.net. Register here.

PATH Summit, 30 September – 2 October, Omni Shoreham Hotel, Washington DC

Those of us who wondered what long-time CEO Jonathan Linkous of the American Telemedicine Association has moved on to now have their answer: CEO of PATH, the Partnership for Artificial Intelligence and Automation in Healthcare. Their first Summit will attempt to answer questions like: “Is artificial intelligence, automation, robotics and sensors the future of healthcare or a passing fad?” It will cover AI innovations, best practices, and barriers to beware (boo!) Find out more and register here, but this Editor’s advice (not that it will be taken) is to drop the silly home page quote from the buffoonish and irrelevant Mark Cuban. 

Connected Health Conference, 17-19 October, Boston

The second year of the combined PCHAlliance Connected Health Conference and the Partners Connected Health Symposium at the impressive Seaport World Trade Center kicks off with co-located conferences followed by two full days of events and expo. Preview it and register here

HealthIMPACT has three events from September into December:

HealthIMPACT Midwest – Rev1 Ventures, Columbus, OH, September 27

NODE.Health Evidence in Digital Medicine Roundtable – Microsoft Technology Center Boston – October 16

NODE.Health Digital Medicine Conference – Microsoft Technology Center, New York, NY – December 5-7

Highlights of The King’s Fund Digital Health and Care Congress 2018

click to enlargeAs The King’s Fund itself pointed to these two Digital Health articles, this Editor (who did not attend) will summarize their findings on the two days. Surely more to come!

Day One: digital transformation was not just about patient and clinician tools, but also about culture and partnerships

  • The King’s Fund’s researchers presented findings from their recently released report, ‘Digital change in health and social care’ where local organizations can speed change faster than nationally (more detail here)
    • Tight collaboration is necessary to bring change, not only within organizations, but also with providers and suppliers
    • The culture gap is significant between technology and clinical and must be overcome
    • Technology may be the only way “by which the NHS would be able to face “long-term pressures” facing the healthcare system”
  • What are lessons learned from national and regional NHS digital transformation projects?
    • How do you bring data together on a large scale?
    • Primary care practice is the obvious place to engage people with technology
  • No ‘post code lottery’–All patients should have access to digital services (the standard criticism of Babylon Health)

Day Two: build the technology around the patient

  • Put the patient first–some technology does not
  • The paramount importance of safeguarding the patient
  • Patients should be involved continuously with technology–and patients inspire technology

TTA is a media partner of The King’s Fund digital health conferences and was pleased to be a supporter this year.

The King’s Fund Digital Health & Care Congress next week on 10-11 July

Time has flown by since this Editor first mentioned this event and now it’s next week. This year’s meeting features case studies in creating the right culture for large scale digital change, using digital technology to improve quality of care, prevention and changing behaviors, population health informatics, tools for self-management, reducing clinical variation, mobile working in community services, and much more. Featured speakers include Matthew Swindells of NHS England, the Rt Hon Paul Burstow of TSA, Ruth Rankine of the Care Quality Commission, and more. See the agenda here for Day 1 and Day 2. (TTA’s own Charles Lowe will be chairing Breakout T2B: Quality improvement 11:45am on Tuesday 10 July.) Two very full days 10-11 July, Tuesday and Wednesday, at The King’s Fund’s London location. For more information, click the advert in the right sidebar or here

Two NY area events: Mission Physician Transition and ‘Their Big Idea’

Tuesday, 26 June: Mission Physician Transition, hosted by Health 2.0 NYC and MedStartr, 6-9 pm, at McCarter & English, 825 Eighth Avenue, NYC

Physicians are increasingly dissatisfied with just being clinicians and want to get involved in healthcare innovation. Similarly, innovative companies need the clinician’s insight into how care actually works in order to create solutions that work for doctors, patients, and all stakeholders in the healthcare value chain. Speakers/panelists to be announced. To register, go through Meetup here.

Thursday, 28 June: Entrepreneur’s Forum–Their Big Idea. Hosted by BioInc@NYMC & iCANny, 5-7 pm, at NY Medical College’s The Café, 19 Skyline Drive, Hawthorne, NY 

Four entrepreneurs present the ideas which they believe could be The Next Big Thing. Moderated by Dan Potocki of Finis Ventures who is experienced in spearheading business development and strategic initiatives for industry-leading data analytics tech startups. Cost: $15 non-members; $12 members, and includes wine and cheese refreshments. Register in advance here.

Rounding up the news: Babylon’s Samsung Health UK deal, smartphone urine test debuts, a VA Home Telehealth ‘announcement’, Aging 2.0’s NY Happy Hour

click to enlargeHuge or Ho-Hum? Babylon’s ‘Ask an Expert’ feature is now available within the Samsung Health app as of the start of June. It will need to be activated at a cost of £50 per year, or £25 for a single consultation. Babylon’s service with over 200 GPs is now available on millions of Samsung Galaxy devices in the UK. Babylon now claims half a million users of its private GP services and 26,500 registered in London with its NHS-funded and controversial GP at Hand app.

Is it as our Editor Charles, quoting Niccolo Machiavelli writing in The Prince, “Nothing is more difficult to undertake, more perilous to conduct or more uncertain in its outcome than to take the lead in introducing a new order of things. For the innovator has for enemies all those who have done well under the old and lukewarm defenders who may do well under the new”. The debate rages–see the comments below the Pulse Today article. 

Healthy.io is introducing a test of its urinalysis by smartphone test with Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust’s new Virtual Renal Clinic. 50 patients will received the Dip.io kit to test their urine. Dip.io uses the standard urine dipstick test combined with a smartphone application that guides the user through scanning in the results with a smartphone camera and sends the result to their doctor. Healthy.io claims this is a first-of-kind technology and system. According to Salford Royal, chronic kidney disease (CKD) costs the NHS £1.45 billion in England alone. The company is part of the NHS Innovation Accelerator Programme. Digital Health News

In what has been the worst kept secret in US telehealth, 1Vision LLC and AMC Health finally announced they were partners in 1Vision’s over $258 million Home Telehealth award by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) [TTA 6 Feb 17]. The news here is that the AMCH release states that they have an “Authority to Operate (ATO)”, which means they can provide Home Telehealth services using AMC Health’s CareConsole to VA-enrolled veterans and their families. This last step is very important because it is a common post-award point of failure for new awardees. Earlier this year, the Iron Bow/Vivify Health award failed on the country of origin of Vivify’s kit, dooming the implementation [TTA 16 Jan] and Iron Bow’s award. (Vivify Health has gone on.) Medtronic, as a long-term incumbent, has few worries in this regard, though any new equipment has to be cleared. The mystery is if Intel-GE Care Innovations, the last new awardee, has passed the ATO bar. AMC Health/1Vision release. 

And on the social front for New Yorkers, raise a Pint 2.0 at Aging 2.0’s NYC Happy Hour, Tuesday 18 July at 310 Bowery Bar, 6pm. Aging 2.0 website, where you can check for a chapter and events near you.

Rounding up more Events of Summer–plus speaker submissions closing soon!

click to enlargeTime flies and so does your calendar! In addition to the important RSM event next Wednesday (maybe more so than the G8 Summit or the NoKo talks, but neither are introduced by Editor Charles!), here are more for your consideration.

Wednesday, 13 June: New York State Chapter’s annual miniHIMSS, “Healthcare on Broadway,” has a full day of speakers in four acts with an emphasis on healthcare advances in NY State and technology applicability. New World Stages in Manhattan starting at 8am. More information here, registration here.

Tuesday, 26 June: Mission Physician Transition into healthcare tech hosted by Health 2.0 NYC and MedStartr, 6-8 pm. More information on Meetup.

Wednesday, 27 June: Newark Venture Partners hosts their 3rd annual Demo Day for their 2018 class at Prudential Center, Newark NJ. Doors open at noon, presentations start at 1:30pm. Investors in NVP span tech, financial, and healthcare with Amazon, Prudential Financial, Dun & Bradstreet, RWJ Barnabas, Horizon BCBSNJ, TD Bank, and Panasonic. Free registration and more details here

Saturday, 30 June: Deadline for speaker submissions for the Connected Health Summit: Engaging Consumers on 28-30 August in San Diego.  The online form is here. TTA is a media partner of the CHS.

Tuesday-Wednesday 10-11 July: The King’s Fund Digital Health and Care Congress. More information here. TTA is an event supporter of the Congress. 

Friday 10th August: Deadline for entries/nominations for the ITEC Awards 2018, to be awarded at the TSA’s annual International Technology Enabled Care Conference 2018 16-17 October in Birmingham. The winners in five categories will be announced on 16 October during the Gala Dinner. 

Building Better Healthcare Awards 2018 open for entries (UK)

Our former Eye on Tenders, Susanne Woodman of BRE, has informed us that this year’s BBH Awards is seeking organizations which are implementing healthcare technologies and software. These can be either process-centered (e.g. information or workflow systems) or patient-centered (e.g. medication compliance, smoking cessation). The organizer, HPCI Media, is accepting entries until 30 June. 

There will be 27 awards across five classes: Building Design, Technology, Estates and Facilities, Staff and Patient Experience, and Special Awards. Last year’s awardees are here. Another theme is the 70th Anniversary of the NHS. 

This year’s awards will be on 31 October at The Brewery in Chiswell Street, London.

Our very best to Susanne as she sets out on new horizons!

The magic quadrant matrix strikes again for health tech and investment potential

click to enlargeDeceptively simple, the quadrant matrix can make sense out of actions and decisions. As a management tool, it can help you prioritize what is most urgent and important, or how to vary your supervisory/coaching style based on the person’s skill and will levels.

Here we see the magic box used by Krishna Yeshwant, MD, a doctor and investor with GV, Alphabet’s venture firm, to sort out all those Next Revolutions in Health Care. The factors that Dr. Yeshwant uses pertain to the end user’s medical and social needs, often called social determinants of health (SDH). Both are meshed, whether in an active older veteran who lives alone in a rural area but manages his diabetes well, or in a homeless substance user in a city with multiple medical conditions.

Most non-medical entrepreneurs prefer to develop tech and services for people like them with low medical/low social needs, such as virtual doctor apps, concierge primary care, and wellness apps. It’s a crowded quadrant and perhaps is over-served. Those with a medical background appear to gravitate to the diagonal quadrant–high medical/high social needs, such as those targeted to the ‘underserved’ with diabetes or high-need care model management, such as Aledade and Iora Health. Where does the investment money go? Their money goes to companies which have developed high medical need therapeutics such as expensive treatments for cancer, neatly avoiding those complex social factors.

What is missing: innovation in low medical/high social needs. This group is at high risk to move into high medical needs due to their lack of organization and access to/willingness for primary care. This Editor agrees, but if another factor is observed–profitability–this is likely the least potential of the four. So if you want to get Dr. Y’s attention and maybe some moolah from Alphabet…. From his presentation at the HLTH meeting last week in Las Vegas. CNBC.

Hungary’s burgeoning med and health tech scene comes to NYC

The NYC MedTech Medical Technology Forum has, for some years, presented programs which bring together the life science, biotech, medical device, and pharma industries. Attendees are always an eclectic mix of executives, reporters, scientists, academics, attorneys, and developers as well as representatives of trade organizations and international partners.

click to enlargeLast week’s presentation at the Consulate General of Hungary provided a view of global health tech rarely seen in the US–the view from Central Europe. It focused on Central European and in particular Hungarian health tech companies, ranging from Big Pharma (Janssen Pharmaceutical/J&J) and law firm Goodwin to six early-stage companies participating in the V4 Connects Global Tour business showcase. The Visegrad Group (the V4) are four Central European countries within the EU–Hungary (this year’s president), Poland, the Czech Republic, and the Slovak Republic–that have worked together since 1991 to promote their regional interests. 

The evening led off with a discussion panel led by Goodwin’s Frederick Rein, a partner in their IP Litigation Group, with Scott Lassman from their Technology & Life Sciences Group and Peter Takacs, Director Real World Evidence Partnership in the Global Market Access Organization of the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson. Most of the discussion was on the differences in drug regulation between the EU and the US, and the swing back in the latter to getting more innovative medical products to US consumers quickly. A hot area is biosimilars, branded drugs that are highly similar but not identical to other drugs, which are gaining FDA approval through the 351(k) pathway. Other topics: the US increasing pressure on pricing and the UK’s Brexit, which will present challenges to drug and device developers from staffing to markets.

Over Hungarian food, drink (excellent Hungarian red and white wines), and networking in adjacent rooms, the five tech-based early stage-companies had café table displays of their products. :

  • Insimu – Interactive medical case study education app with simulated patients for students to test their diagnostic and clinical skills on virtual patients. The founder, Gabor Toth MD, is targeting medical schools: currently in use in Hungary and 39 other countries. 
  • Vitrolink – Imaged-based tumor detection tool for pathology decision support. While the number of diagnostic tests is increasing, the number of pathologists worldwide is actually decreasing. Vitrolink is a free connecting platform for pathologists to share information which will eventually move to researchers and patients. Contact Dr. István Szarka.
  • Now Tech – The Gyroset is a smart wheelchair controller and proportional head controller, an unobtrusive band that contains an eye level camera.
  • click to enlargeNotch – Movements reconstructed in 3D for smartphones. The main use is in physical therapy. It captures position, motion, and acceleration through multiple sensors, calculating and graphically representing degrees of motion. Contact Stepan Boltalin, founder/CEO.
  • click to enlargeME3D – 3D CFD-based analysis system for vascular anastomosis (suturing). The co-founder, Balazs Gasz MD, is a vascular surgeon and the kit plus model offers a realistic recreation of the surgical vascular environment (left) for medical training.

(The sixth, Promobox, is a gift box for maternity/baby products available in Hungary’s hospitals.)

Many thanks to founder/organizer John Lieberman CPA/PFS, the Managing Director of Perelson Weiner LLP and Gábor Takács, Hungarian 1st Secretary for Science and Technology, who will shortly be moving to London.

Events roundup: The King’s Fund, SEHTA, RSM, VR4REHAB, Parks Associates, HealthIMPACT, Telemedicine SPS

click to enlargeIt’s spring into summer, prime time for healthcare and related conferences.

If you are in the UK, prime territory on your calendar will be marked for 10-11 July in London at The King’s Fund 2018 Digital Health and Care Congress. Content and case studies include creating the right culture for large-scale digital change, using digital technology to improve quality of care, prevention and changing behaviors, population health informatics, tools for self-management, and much more. Find out more here. It includes a drinks reception on Tuesday 11th. Follow The King’s Fund on Twitter here: #KFdigital18. TTA is a media partner of the Digital Health Congress.

Hacking for Solutions is the prior week (4-5 July). It’s part of the three-year VR4REHAB project, with partners including The Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust and Teesside University, with the objective of developing new VR applications that promote better function and outcomes for patients and children with disabilities. Find out more on the UK Hackathon here and the international program here. At Brunel University London, Department of Clinical Sciences, Mary Seacole Building, Kingston Lane. 

SEHTA’s 2018 AGM & Annual Conference is 13 June at the Mary Sumner House, 24 Tufton Street, London. More information here.

The RSM has two upcoming events presented by the Telemedicine and eHealth Section: The 4th Annual Future of Medicine: The Role of Doctors in 2028 on 13 June and the timely Health Data: Who Owns It and How to Keep It Safe on 24 September.

And last, the Digital Healthcare Show will be 27-28 June at ExCeL London as part of Health+Care, positioned as Europe’s largest integrated health and social care event. More information on their very flashy website here. The TSA will host their Summer Forum at the Technology Enabled Care Theatre including updates on key areas for TEC and why regulation and standards are so vitally important for TECS. TSA members can receive discounted passes. UK Telehealthcare will also have members’ activities during the show.

For more upcoming UK Telehealthcare events starting 7-8 June, click the advert at the upper right. 

In the US, Parks Associates’ 2018 Connected Health Summit: Engaging Consumers will be held 28-30 August at the Manchester Grand Hyatt in San Diego, California. This year will analyze the role of innovative connected health solutions in driving changes in consumer behaviors as well as how healthcare systems, insurers, and hospital networks interact with consumers.  Speaker submissions are open until 1 June–more information is hereEarly registration is open. TTA is a media partner of the Connected Health Summit and there will be more on this as we move closer to the event.

HealthIMPACT East moves to Washington, DC’s National Union Building 18-20 July with deep dives, re-think tanks, and re-boot camps. Their goal is to improve healthcare through technologies making a meaningful impact on patient outcomes and experience through honest and candid best practice sharing. The new format provides a TED-like experience to senior health system leadership. Register before 1 June with promo code HIEEB2018 to save 30%. The Digital Medicine Conference will return to NYC on 5-7 December. TTA is a past media partner of HealthIMPACT.

The Telemedicine & Telehealth Service Provider Summit (SPS) is annually organized by the Arizona Telemedicine Program, one of the pioneering organizations of practitioners in the US. This year the meeting is 8-9 October in Glendale, AZ, but abstracts for poster presentations are still open till 30 June. 

Health 2.0 NYC Empowered Patients event rescheduled to 16 May; apply now to the Digital Health Breakthrough Network (NYC)

Empowered Patient 2018: Using Big Data & Technology to Empower Patients & Providers to Make Healthier Decisions
Verywell, 1500 Broadway (at 43rd), 6th Floor (Verywell)–now 16 May

Overview: Big Data is rapidly transforming the healthcare industry – from personalizing content to the patients’ individual needs to making medical diagnoses and outcomes more predictive. The panel of industry experts from various companies ranging from healthcare publishing, research, and technology will discuss how Big Data is enabling this evolution with content, product, and services to democratize health information and provide insights that improve medical care, research, and the overall patient experience. Technology is already making a difference, but raises privacy and ethical issues.

Agenda:
6:00 – Meet, Greet, and tweet with healthy snacks provided by event sponsor: Verywell
6:30–  Panel Discussion
7:15 – Get to know other healthcare innovators in the community

Moderator: Dr. Deepna Devkar, Senior Director, Data Science, Dotdash
Panel:
Marlene Guraieb, PhD – Senior Data Scientist, Oscar Health
Dmitriy (Dima) Gorenshteyn, PhD, Senior Data Scientist, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
Rob Parisi, SVP/GM Verywell – This evening’s sponsor and site host is a leading health and wellness site that provides trusted advice for a healthier life to its 20 million monthly unique visitors.
Joy Fennel, Empowered Patient – pilot patient on mymee, a digital therapeutic solution for autoimmune disorders – see www.mymee.com
Libbe Englander, PhD., CEO, Pharm3r, a healthcare analytics company helping improve outcomes with big data

Tickets $15, the snacks and drinks (and crowd) are great. Register and pay here. TTA and Editor Donna are longtime supporters of Health 2.0 NYC and Medstartr, the organizing groups behind this event.

A startup looking for funding? Look no further than the Digital Health Breakthrough Network. Sponsored by NYCEDC and HITLAB, they are in the process of recruiting their fourth class of startups. Eligible companies are early-stage startups (pre-revenue/pre-Series A), based in NYC (50 percent+ of employees), with an innovative digital health technology that presents a novel solution to a significant need in the health marketplace. Applications are open until 15 June. More information here and here.

Health tech founder ousted over alleged ‘acts of intimidation, abuse, and mistrust’: some reflections (Soapbox)

And we thought they were par for the course. Those of us who have worked for company founders, CEOs, and senior execs have learned that some interesting personalities come with the territory, especially in entrepreneurial companies. This Editor has worked for at least one diagnosed ADHD, a bipolar ADHD, another with anger management/impulse control issues, and a gentleman who is now spending a few years in a Federal penitentiary for securities fraud. One of her most memorable CEOs made the cover of Fortune with the caption, “Is this America’s Toughest Boss?” and no, his name was not Donald Trump. (Clue: he was chairman of what was for a time the world’s largest airline conglomerate.)

Of late, there’s been the behavioral quirks of their founders leading to disastrous problems at Uber, Theranos, and Zenefits. It often seems that the more hype, the more sunshine, daisies, puppy dogs, mission, and ‘fab culture’ are on the website, the worse the dysfunctional reality and mistreatment of the troops.

Perhaps no longer. Monday’s very public firing by his board of Ron Gutman, CEO of HealthTap, a digital health all-over-the-map company that now has settled into a members-only patient-doctor mobile health platform, over non-financial behavior may be a first. Mr. Gutman was given the heave-ho by his board after, notably, months of effort. Recode cited a termination letter to him that he “committed acts of intimidation, abuse, and mistrust, and that [he] repeatedly mistreated, threatened, harassed and verbally abused employees.” The coup de grâce: “The toxicity you introduced into the workplace ends now.”

An all-hands memo to employees was more restrained:

After receiving concerning reports by employees about Ron’s conduct as CEO, the Board of Directors hired an outside law firm to conduct an investigation into these allegations. What we learned left us with no choice but to make this change, and we did so after taking the necessary steps from a corporate governance perspective.

The replacing CEO is Bill Gossman, a serial founder and a partner in one of the investors, Mohr Davidow Ventures.

Mr. Gutman has denied it all, stating that he did not abuse employees and that the VCs are in violation of their duties. (FYI, not a whiff here of #MeToo antics.)

Funded to the tune of $38 million by Khosla Ventures, Mayfield Fund, and Eric Schmidt’s Innovation Endeavors, but without fresh funding in five years, the public face of both Mr. Gutman and HealthTap (of which he is the very public face, appearing all over their website still) is one with a very large smile. Mr. Gutman gained some fame from his TED talk and book on the power of smiling. One wonders how the smile is doing today. A frown turned upside down. TechCrunch, Mobihealthnews

Confronto Nazionale sul Software in Sanità (National Comparison on Healthcare Software), 4-5 July, Rome

Policlinico Gemelli, Rome, 4-5 July

If you are one of our Readers in Italy or curious about the state of Italian healthcare technology as part of EU developments, 14 healthcare and IT system groups have come together for a meeting on technology innovation. The meeting will examine how health system stakeholders are developing and deploying software that supports the strategic, organizational, operational and clinical processes of service provision. The main discussion will center on sustainability, usability, performance, and interoperability with a focus on the EU’s Horizon 2020 and Italy’s particular situation in (translation) “extreme institutional, managerial and technical confusion. The result of this confusion is the continuous hemorrhaging of economic, logistical and human resources for the functioning of very restricted areas of health that are not interoperable with each other.” There is considerably more information on their website or you may contact the organizer, Koncept Ltd., t. 055 357223, m. 334 7365693, email segreteria@koncept.it

The health tech events of summer: The King’s Fund (London) and Parks Associates (San Diego) (Updated)

Summer is coming, even if it’s difficult to believe that April Showers (or Snow) bring May Flowers. Here’s a preview of two health tech events to put on your calendar later on this year in mid and late summer.

The King’s Fund Digital Health and Care Congress 10-11 July, at their location in London. Content and case studies include creating the right culture for large-scale digital change, using digital technology to improve quality of care, prevention and changing behaviors, population health informatics, tools for self-management, and much more. Speakers include Matthew Swindell of NHS England and the Rt. Hon. Paul Burstow of the TSA. Information and registration are now available here. (Updated this week!) Follow The King’s Fund on Twitter here: #KFdigital18. TTA is a media partner of the Digital Health Congress.

Parks Associates’ 2018 Connected Health Summit: Engaging Consumers will be held 28-30 August at the Manchester Grand Hyatt in San Diego, California. This year will analyze the role of innovative connected health solutions in driving changes in consumer behaviors as well as how healthcare systems, insurers, and hospital networks interact with consumers. Updated: Confirmed keynotes are Deborah DiSanzo, General Manager, IBM Watson Health and–just added–Christopher Weber, General Manager of Uber Health [see this Editor’s thoughts on Uber from last month]. Speaker submissions are open until 1 June–more information is here. Early registration is now open. TTA is a media partner of the Connected Health Summit.

Upcoming London events–a few suggestions

Here are three upcoming events in London that readers may be interested in.

The Royal Society of Medicine’s mHealth Apps conference, 19th April

This, the sixth such annual event, brings together the good and the great in the medical apps world to inform you of recent and expected developments in evaluation, regulation, legislation, behaviour change and assessment, as well as some heartening stories of successful apps. Presenters will include Alexia Tonnel of NICE, Neil McGuire from MHRA and Hazel Jones from NHS Digital alongside Prof Jeremy Wyatt, giving an academic view, Julian Hitchcock, a European regulatory view and Dr Richard Brady his not-to-be-missed “Bad Apps” exploration of the dark side of medical technology.  Book here.

Bridging the Gap, 2nd May, Wellcome Collection, London

Join Commercial Directors from across the AHSN Network on Wednesday 2 May 2018 for a range of 1:1 advice sessions, workshops and networking opportunities at the AHSN Network’s fully subsidised “Bridging the Gap” event that’s open to all health technology companies.Delegates will be able to get advice about how to make their engagement with the NHS sharper and more cost effective. That means understanding how decisions are made in the NHS, who makes the decisions and how to get their attention. They’ll also provide opportunities to test and and develop your value proposition, budget impact model and your approach to evaluation and case study development. Book here.

Confirmed AHSNs taking part include: Eastern, HIN, ICHP, Kent Surrey Sussex, South West, West Midlands, West of England, UCLPartners, Yorkshire and Humber. National organisations also taking part and supporting the event include: NHS England, NICE and NIHR.

The Future of Medicine; the role of doctors in 2028, on 13th June

This, the fourth annual event on this topic from the RSM, will focus on how technology is likely to change the way medicine is delivered over the next ten years. This year we have three speakers focusing on how technology is affecting the way medicine is taught, and how medical students are being taught differently, to enable them to be most effective in this new world. Should be essential attendance for digital health executives looking for new inspiration!

Presenters include Professor Jo Martin, Professor of Pathology, Queen Mary University of London, Director of Academic Health Sciences, Barts Health NHS Trust, and President Royal College of Pathologists, and Will Cavendish who was the senior Civil Servant in the Office of Life Sciences (OLS) when George Freemen (a previous presenter at this event) was heading the OLS. Book here.

Disclosure: Charles Lowe is ex-President of the RSM’s Telemedicine Section and was involved in setting up both the above RSM events.

Robots, robots at CES: ElliQ, Sophia the ‘humanoid’, companions, pets, butlers, maids…and at a supermarket near you?

click to enlargeCES as usual was a Robot Showcase, though without the presence of our recent Spotlight Robot Kompaï.  One of our other Spotlighters, Intuition Robotics‘ ElliQ companion robot, won the CES Best of Innovation Award in the Smart Home category (release).

click to enlargeMuch press went to Hanson Robotics’ Sophia, a Frubber-skinned humanoid robot from Hong Kong. It (She?) sees through cameras and sensors, through them recognizes speech and facial expressions, responds through natural language processing, and has a motion control system. It started walking on its own at CES courtesy of DRC-HUBO-developed legs. Its creator David Hanson, backed by Disney (Animatronics!) looks forward to an adult-level of general intelligence via AI development for future uses such as customer service, caring for children or older adults, or therapy. It has the ‘uncanny valley’ problem of verging on lifelike. The BBC interviewed Sophia at CES. (No, they didn’t sign her to be a presenter.) SFGate. The AI crowd in Silicon Valley and Facebook’s AI head with the interesting name of Yann LeCun performed a Two-Minute Hate about her to a rather partisan writer in The Verge. (Not Invented Here Syndrome? Perhaps they’re just envious.)

click to enlargeMost of CES’ robots were a Parade of Cute and When Not Cute, Wistful. Or Not Working. Sony’s brought back the Aibo robot dog out of its 2006 retirement with the ERS 1000, which lacks only a non-shed coat to be puppy-like. According to the WSJ, $1,700 will make Aibo your companion–and it doesn’t need food or walking. Blue Frog Robotics’ Buddy is a family companion, control point for connected homes, and security monitor. You might trip over it and the $1,500 cost. More in the utility line is Ubtech Robotics’ Walker which, unlike the Walker of ‘Point Blank’, isn’t looking for his $93,000 but will walk point around your house for security, connect you to your home controls, and ‘butler’ your appointments, emails, and video calls. The maid’s duties will be done by the Aeolus Robot, which will sweep, pick up and put away your things, and also do some assistant work. Honda’s 3E robots are Transformer-like for more commercial duties like assistants, smart scooters, and carriers. A more here-and-now robot addressing a major need is another robotic glove for those with hand or mobility restrictions, the leather glove-like NeoMano.

click to enlargeNot every robot was on their best behavior. Going on the fritz were LG’s CLOi smart home controller–on stage, no less. YYD’s latest robot, not only a home assistant but also a health status/chronic disease monitor, died into screen code in front of a BBC reporter. One of Softbank’s Pepper robots (left) was so overwhelmed by the excitement of CES that it fainted. Perhaps time to return to the calm of the Ostend, Belgium hospital? [TTA 21 June 16] Wired UK, South China Morning Post, CNet

Back in the Real World. Welcomed into Scottish supermarket chain Margiotta was ‘ShopBot’, dubbed Fabio. In an experiment run by Heriot-Watt University for the BBC’s Six Robots & Us (UK viewers only), Fabio was programmed with directions to hundreds of items in the store. It had an abundance of cute. Customers initially liked Fabio. Unfortunately, its conversational quality and conveyance of information were sorely lacking. For instance, Fabio told customers to go to the ‘alcohol section’ when they wanted beer. (Now if they wanted Scotch….) On top of it, its mobility was limited, and the disability laws don’t apply. So the Margiottas sacked Fabio, with regrets but no severance, after one week on the job. Oh. Telegraph (paywalled), Yahoo News UK