Search Results for hackermania

VA’s moves spell the end of the homegrown EHR

...its growing concession that VistA won’t do in caring for American veterans makes it clear that the future of EHRs is in private systems from major developers–a field which is winnowing out to The Few (take that, GE). There is also the push to make them interoperable so that patient information can move between them–securely, an overwhelming concern with Hackermania Running Wild. Epic has been taking considerable heat for designing a closed system, which was vehemently denied in a recent interview with HealthcareITNews. The international struggle to develop EHRs generally starts with the push to create one central system and... Continue Reading

Data breach cost crests $4 million: Ponemon Institute

[grow_thumb image=”http://telecareaware.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/Hackermania.jpg” thumb_width=”150″ /]The average fully allocated cost of a data breach, according to the 2016 Ponemon Institute study (sponsored by IBM) is now over $4 million. The average global cost of every lost or stolen record is $158, but for healthcare organizations, that average cost is $355 per record, which reflects the higher street value of healthcare information. Healthcare was the second most ‘churned’ type of organization, surpassed only by financial services. Across the industries surveyed, hacking and ‘inside jobs’ caused the most data breaches overall–48 percent. (Hackermania does really run wild!) Healthcare organizations can mitigate costs by being... Continue Reading

Ransom! (ware) strikes more hospitals and Apple (update)–Healthcare.gov’s plus trouble

[grow_thumb image=”http://telecareaware.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/Hackermania.jpg” thumb_width=”150″ /]Get out the Ransom! California hospitals appear to be Top of the Pops for ransomware attacks, which lock down and encrypt information after someone opens a malicious link in email, making it inaccessible. After the well-publicized attack on Hollywood Presbyterian in February, this week two hospitals in the Inland Empire, Chino Valley Medical Center in Chino and Desert Valley Hospital in Victorville, both owned by Prime Healthcare Management, received demands. While hacked, neither hospital paid the ransom and no patient data was compromised according to hospital spokesmen. Additional hospitals earlier this month: Methodist Hospital in Henderson, Kentucky... Continue Reading

Fitness trackers, mobile apps shown to leak sensitive data

[grow_thumb image=”http://telecareaware.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/band1.jpg” thumb_width=”150″ /]An unnerving 35-page report published by Canadian nonprofit OpenEffect, assisted by the Citizen Lab at the Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto, claims that leading fitness trackers and their corresponding mobile apps are veritable sieves of personal data, inviting security breaches. Where Hackermania Runs Wild starts with lack of Bluetooth LE privacy, allowing tracking via Bluetooth even when the tracker isn’t paired to a smartphone. Then many of the companion apps leaked login credentials, transmitted activity tracking information in a way that allowed interception or tampering, or allowed users (or others) to insert false activity... Continue Reading

The evolution of Facebook: implications for social health

...for the site, you should expect that every piece of information you submit (even if it is not currently displayed) may be shared with our partners and any member of PatientsLikeMe, including other patients.” We’ve also noted that genomics data may not be sufficiently de-identified so that it can’t be matched through inference [TTA 31 Oct 15], with the potential for sale. And of course Hackermania Running Wild continues (see here). For now general information sites like WebMD and personalized reference sites such as Medivisor feel more secure to users, as well as small non-commercialized OSGs and ‘closed’ telehealth/telemedicine systems.... Continue Reading

Hackers hit another Blue Cross, put 10.5 million members at risk (Breaking)

[grow_thumb image=”http://telecareaware.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/Hackermania.jpg” thumb_width=”150″ /]BREAKING NEWS This time the data breach is at Excellus Blue Cross Blue Shield, which covers upstate New York (Rochester-Syracuse area). It was discovered by Excellus on 5 August but dated back to 23 Dec 13, and reportedly has compromised members’ names, addresses, telephone numbers, Social Security numbers, financial account information and in some cases sensitive medical information. According to the AP/NBC, it also breached other divisions of Excellus and the corporate parent, Lifetime Healthcare: Lifetime Benefit Solutions, Lifetime Care, Lifetime Health Medical Group, The MedAmerica Companies and Univera Healthcare. The source of the hack has not... Continue Reading

Extent, cost of health ID theft exposed in Wall Street Journal

...a healthcare equivalent of the FCBA, especially as healthcare organizations receive Federal funding. For healthcare providers, it would provide a bully incentive to tighten their security–as credit cards and banks did–because it would severely limit payment collections (the ‘hounding’) from the victims of fraudulent billing. How Identity Theft Sticks You With Hospital Bills Unfortunately the WSJ has chosen to paywall this article, but if you search on the title you can generally find the content either reprinted or in a WSJ preview. Previously in TTA: our many articles on hackermania, healthcare related identity theft (Harry Lime Lives!) and data security... Continue Reading

What’s news at the end of the week

...IPO next week. Wall Street Journal….Now an EHR and PHR join Hackermania Running Wild. Medical Informatics Engineering reported Tuesday that in May their server was cyberattacked, exposing PHI of patients in five clients and separately information contained in the NoMoreClipboard PHR subsidiary. POLITICO reports that this is the first recorded instance of an EHR compromise. MIE Release, POLITICO Morning eHealth….If you are in the Cleveland, Ohio area and have an interest, Concussion: A National Challenge is a free, two-day event on detection and diagnosis sponsored by the National Academy of Engineering, the Institute of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Metro... Continue Reading

58 percent of health data breaches due to simple theft, not hacking: JAMA

[grow_thumb image=”http://telecareaware.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/keep-calm-and-encrypt-your-data-5.png” thumb_width=”150″ /] Criminal activity is the cause of nearly 6 out of 10 data breaches, according to a study published in JAMA last week (subscription required). Cyberbreaches–the infamous hacking attacks–produce breaches in the millions, but the far more typical and frequent breach, if smaller, is caused by simple theft of records–electronic and paper. HealthLeaders We’ve reported previously that stolen records (over 500) have ranged from laptops to paper records as landfill and even old-style X-rays in dead storage sought after for mercury content. So if Hackermania is not always running wild, except when it is, how to keep... Continue Reading

“Data moves at the speed of trust”–RWJF report

The report issued today by the influential Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF), ‘Data for Health: Learning What Works’ advocates a fresh approach to health data through greater education on the value/importance of sharing PHI, improved security and privacy safeguards and investing in community data infrastructure. If the above quote and the first two items sound contradictory, perhaps they are, but current ‘strict’ privacy regulations (that’s you, HIPAA), data siloing and the current state of the art in security aren’t stemming Hackermania (or sheer bad data hygiene and security procedures). Based on three key themes, the RWJF is recommending a suite... Continue Reading