Search Results for traumatic brain injury

The Theranos Story, ch. 65: Elizabeth Holmes’ “mental disease or defect” defense revealed

...at Fullerton. According to her bio, her “work focuses on the psychosocial consequences of violence, trauma, and victimization with an emphasis on violence against women and other forms of interpersonal violence. Her work has addressed the mental health consequences of violence, such as Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and depression as well as other important physical and social health outcomes.” The defense attempted to introduce this evidence without further examination by the Federal prosecution. Unfortunately, US District Judge Edward Davila did not agree. Ms. Holmes will be examined by two experts for the prosecution: Daniel Martell, Ph.D., a forensic neuropsychologist for the... Continue Reading

‘Before the Ashes Fall’: the story behind the book and the movie in development about dementia

...wasn’t until an unequivocal tipping point- “my husband left the stovetop gas on’’-that it was no longer ‘normal’. That same moment generated guilt within the de facto caretaker (spouse, daughter, etc.) of what could have been prevented. I researched the diseases of Dementia -Alzheimer’s is but one diagnosis and it alone will cost over $1 trillion (globally) in 2020 alone. I also learned life choices and even traumatic events had a dramatic impact on the diseases’ progression. Those two points are the most critical: we have some control and hope with increased awareness. In July of 2020, my book was... Continue Reading

Hackermania runs wild…all the way to the bank! Ransomware strikes Crozer-Keystone, UCSF med school, others

...million (£910,000) in 116.4 bitcoins after an attack starting 1 June that was also (to add insult to injury) published on Netwalker’s public blog. In the timeline presented by BBC News, it was negotiated down (professionally) from $3 million; BBC also obtained some key parts of the negotiation via an anonymous tipoff, and it’s fascinating reading. Netwalker leads the victim to a dark web ‘customer service’ site where there’s a countdown to double payment or deletion of your now-encrypted data. They are also able to live chat with the victim. UCSF was able to limit the malware encryption damage to... Continue Reading

The biggest care gap: the fear of going home after discharge

Roy Lilley’s NHS Managers.net newsletter is always interesting and worth subscribing to, but this week’s issue had a special resonance. Many of us have had to ‘manage’ a situation when you or a family member comes home after an illness, accident, or even minor injury. The actions you took for granted are now difficult, painful, or simply cannot be done. Climbing stairs, making a bed, lifting a full pot, even getting on a coat or jacket or tucking in a shirt are just a few. These have special resonance for those of us who have a few ‘cycles’ on us... Continue Reading

Slow gait speed at age 45 as an accelerated aging predictor–and result: Duke University study

Tracking gait not just for tracking acuity and functioning in older adults in care homes. A five-decade cohort study made of over 900 45 year-old adults in a single community–Dunedin, New Zealand–correlates slowness of gait with accelerated aging, including brain health measured as early as age 3. These markers include: Decreased cortical thickness Reduced brain volume Poorer physical functions such as balance, hand grip, stepping, and physical-motor coordination 19 biomarkers taken at ages 26, 32, 38, and 45 years including body mass index, waist-to-hip ratio, glycated hemoglobin level, leptin level, blood pressure, cholesterol, C-reactive protein level, white blood cell count,... Continue Reading

Are AI’s unknown workings–fed by humans–creating intellectual debt we can’t pay off?

Financial debt shifts control—from borrower to lender, and from future to past. Mounting intellectual debt may shift control, too. A world of knowledge without understanding becomes a world without discernible cause and effect, in which we grow dependent on our digital concierges to tell us what to do and when. Debt theory and AI. This Editor never thought of learning exactly how something works as a kind of intellectual paydown of debt on what Donald Rumsfeld called ‘known unknowns’–we know it works, but not exactly how. It’s true of many drugs (aspirin), some medical treatments (deep brain stimulation for Parkinson’s–and... Continue Reading

VA’s REACH Vet uses algorithms and AI to predict critical mental health needs–including suicide risk

The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has been using artificial intelligence and patient data as part of a suicide prevention program for veterans–a top clinical priority for VA. The REACH Vet program, started in 2017, uses predictive algorithms to identify risk factors for suicide in millions of veteran patient records for medications, treatment, traumatic events, overall health, and other information. It then uses the information to determine the top 0.1 percent of veterans at any facility at the highest risk for suicide in the next year. Clinicians then call these veterans for about an hour’s conversation, offering to help them... Continue Reading

It’s Official: CES is now a health tech event (updated)

...Move ECG from the revitalized Withings TTA 10 Oct 18 and Omron’s HeartGuide), and robots all appeared. Samsung again brought out a brace of concept robots. Last year’s Best of CES ElliQ is finally available for pre-order after three years at a measly $1,500. The humanoid Sophia brought a kid sister, the equally creepy Little Sophia, both of whom failed during this CNET video. Yes, Pepper from Softbank made its appearance and apparently didn’t wilt as it did last year. Sleep tech was another hot item, with a spin on sleep diagnostics or improvement from many products. A brainwave product,... Continue Reading

Ultrasound to break up brain amyloid plaques moving to human trials in 2019

Somewhat outside of telecare, but inside our concern with the health of older people, is the exciting news of a novel ultrasound treatment to break up the amyloid plaques in the brain that may be the cause of many dementias and Alzheimer’s Disease. Initially developed at the University of Queensland in 2015, the original objective was to open the blood-brain barrier to facilitate antibody treatment for dementia. Researchers found that in tests on mice, the ultrasound ablation cleared the plaques without any further drugs. Later tests found that the treatment clears both “toxic proteins and restores memory function safely in... Continue Reading

News roundup: NeuroPace’s brain study, Welbeing’s Liverpool win, VA’s Apple talks, Medtronic’s diabetes move

NeuroPace, which developed an implanted brain-responsive neuromodulation system for patients with refractory and drug-resistant epilepsy, announced the result of their nine-year long-term treatment study. Approximately 3 out of 4 patients responded to therapy, achieving at least 50% seizure reduction 1 in 3 patients achieved at least 90% seizure reduction 28% of patients experienced seizure-free periods of six months or longer; 18% experienced seizure-free periods of one year or longer Median seizure reduction across all patients was 75% at 9 years Quality of life improvements (including cognition) were sustained through 9 years, with no chronic stimulation-related side effects. The study included... Continue Reading