Search Results for data breach

The Theranos Story, ch. 66: Walgreens and Safeway aren’t investors, they’re business partners!

...fund the rollout of Theranos Wellness Centers in Walgreens US locations starting in 2013. Walgreens filed suit against Theranos in November 2016 to recoup that investment based on breach of contract, after civil lawsuits were filed against them jointly, halted development, and settled for $25 to 30 million in late July 2017 when Theranos assets were dwindling to barely breathing status [TTA 3 Aug 17]. More details on their Partnership from Hell are recapped here from the 2016 lawsuit. Safeway’s involvement as the exclusive supermarket partner was planned to be even more extensive. Their 2012 deal was $350 million for... Continue Reading

TTA Enters Fall: DOJ indicts 86 for $4.5 bn in ‘telemedicine’ fraud, Doro buys Spain’s Victrix, and can telehealth save clinical trials?

    We open October with the US DOJ’s blockbuster indictments of multiple ‘telemedicine’ companies reaping billions in fraudulent payments. Sweden’s Doro continues its acquisition tear with Victrix, adding data analytics and proactive intervention capability to monitoring. Clinical trials are another coronavirus casualty–but RPM and telehealth may be able to help. DOJ ‘takedown’ charges 86 defendants with $4.5 bn in fraudulent telemedicine claims in largest ever action (‘Telemedicine’ enters the big leagues of Medicare fraud for DME, tests, and drugs) COVID-19’s negative impact on clinical trials–can remote patient monitoring and telehealth companies help? (Arkivum’s extensive study has implications) Doro adds... Continue Reading

COVID-19’s negative impact on clinical trials–can remote patient monitoring and telehealth companies help?

We’ve previously noted the interest of large drug clinical trials companies in remote patient monitoring–example the acquisition of the much-passed-along Care Innovations by PRA Health Sciences [TTA 8 Apr]. Logically, these clinical trials have been hampered by the COVID-19 pandemic, affecting recruitment, data sharing, preservation of data, and how trials can be conducted. TMF Futures: Keeping Data Alive has just been published by Arkivum, a University of Southampton (UK) spin-out which specializes in the digital preservation of valuable data for the life sciences industry and global scientific institutions through the Arkivum Trust. This initial survey was conducted in July 2020... Continue Reading

Will the rise of technology mean the fall of privacy–and what can be done? UK seeks a new National Data Guardian.

...prevent ‘nefarious use’ of sharing data and identifying de-identified data for which you, the vulnerable, have given consent, to that end? It’s exhausting. Why avoid the problem in the first place? Having observed the uses and misuses of genomics data, this Editor will harp on again that we should have a Genomic Data Bill of Rights [TTA 29 Aug 18] for consumers to be fully transparent on where their data is going, how it is being used, and to easily keep their data private without jumping through a ridiculous number of hoops. This could be expandable to all health data.... Continue Reading

News roundup: Ancestry sells 75% to Blackstone, Cornwall NHS partners with Tunstall, most dangerous health IT trends, Slovenski departs from Walmart Health

...has not been as proactive in linking genetic information to health outcomes. STAT This Editor noted back in August 2018 that it was long past time for a Genomic Data Bill of Rights for consumers to be fully transparent on where their data is going, how it is being used, and to easily keep their data private without jumping through a ridiculous number of hoops. It’s a conclusion now being reached by various privacy groups according to MedCityNews. Also noted is that Ancestry, in its complex and long privacy policy, can use your “personal information to market new products from... Continue Reading

Weekend ‘Must Read’: Are Big Tech/Big Pharma’s health tech promises nothing but a dangerous fraud?

...diagnosed. Big Data demands a high level of math literacy. Most decision makers are not data geeks. And those of us who work with numbers are often baffled by results and later find the calcs are el wrongo–this Editor speaks from personal experience on simple CMS data sets. In order to be valuable, AI and machine learning demand access to potentially sensitive data. What’s the tradeoff? Where’s the consent? Implicit in the article is cui bono? Google and its social media rivals want data on us to monetize–in other words, sell stuff to us. Better health and outcomes are just... Continue Reading

While telehealth virtual office visits flatten, overall up 300-fold; FCC finalizes COVID-19 telehealth funding program (US)

As expected, the trend of telehealth visits versus in-person is flattening as primary care offices and urgent care clinics reopen. Yet the overall trend is up through May–a dizzying 300-fold, as tracked by the new Epic Health Research Network (EHRN–yes, that Epic). Their analysis compares 15 March-8 May 2020 to the same dates in 2019 using data from 22 health systems in 17 states which cover seven million patients. It also constructs a visit diagnosis profile comparison, which leads with hypertension, hyperlipidemia, pain, and diabetes–with the 2020 addition of — unsurprisingly — anxiety. POLITICO Future Pulse analyzed EHRN data into... Continue Reading

News Roundup: Doctor on Demand’s $75M Series D, Google’s Fitbit buy scrutinized, $5.4 bn digital health funding breaks record

...the data!), it signals further investigation. The next waypost is 20 July where EU regulators will present their decision. The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) announced in mid-June their concerns in a preliminary decision, though they don’t have the jurisdiction to block it. “Buying Fitbit will allow Google to build an even more comprehensive set of user data, further cementing its position and raising barriers to entry to potential rivals,” according to ACCC Chairman Rod Sims. This adds to the controversy Down Under on how Google and other internet companies use personal information. Final statement is 13 August. Reuters... Continue Reading

Hackermania runs wild…all the way to the bank! Ransomware strikes Crozer-Keystone, UCSF med school, others

...servers within the School of Medicine (according to the BBC, literally unplugging computers; according to UCSF, isolating servers) but decided to pay the ransom to unlock the encrypted data and return data they obtained, stating in its public release “The data that was encrypted is important to some of the academic work we pursue as a university serving the public good”. They will work with the FBI on the incident and have brought on board outside expert help. According to FierceHealthcare, Netwalker was also behind the attack on the Champaign-Urbana Public Health District (Illinois) website in March and Michigan State... Continue Reading

Where in the world is the NHS COVID contact tracing app? Apps rolling out globally, but will they roll out before it’s treatable ?

...great deal of fuss has been made of other countries adopting contact tracing apps that actually work. Most of these are built on a platform developed by Apple and Google. These have been used in Italy, Switzerland, Latvia, and Poland. Austria is in test, Germany just launched. Japan’s is on a Microsoft platform. Countries that launched earlier have had their wrinkles. Italy is feuding over issues of data privacy. Norway’s Smittestopp app, which used both GPS and BTE to advise those contacted to self-isolate, was stopped by the Norwegian Data Protection Authority on disproportionate intrusion into users’ privacy. A bug... Continue Reading