TSA appoints new chair

Paul Shead has succeeded Andrew Gardner as Chair of TSA. He has worked closely with the TSA and its membership since the organisation’s inception, and has been on the TSA’s board of directors since May 2012. He will chair the board for the next 12 months, working to develop strategy, monitor performance and extend the organisation’s sphere of influence. Paul’s experience of the telecare industry spans more than 20 yearsCurrently he is Managing Director of Verklizan, supplier of the UMO telecare and telehealth monitoring platform to housing associations, local authorities and private companies in the UK.

Commenting on his appointment, Paul said: ‘Social care and health are facing unprecedented pressures. The need effectively to commission, procure and quality-assure technology enabled care (“TEC”) has never been greater. The shift of analogue to digital also presents huge opportunities and risks. The fast-changing pace of TEC means that a new audience of digital health companies is springing up alongside more traditional telecare organisations. I’m keen to ensure that TSA can support and inspire every part of the UK’s diverse technology enabled care sector. I look forward to working alongside the TSA Board, Chief Executive, President and staff to ensure that we respond effectively to challenges, make the case for TEC and work to shape future policy. We must provide our growing and diverse membership with the knowledge, intelligence and ideas to sell their products and take the sector forward.’ (more…)

TTA’s week: digital health investment StartsUp, data mining downer, UDG buys, tender alerts

The big news was another record-breaking report on digital health investment from StartUp Health. A new trend may be buying healthcare consultancies. We’re dismayed at too much data mining for health conditions…and watching for pharma innovations in NYC.

See below for August’s Connected Health Summit 2017 in San Diego–save 20%

Tender Alerts: Warwickshire, Thurrock, and Hertfordshire (Another quiet tender week)
Creepy data mining on medical conditions run wild: where’s the privacy? (Ethically dubious practices)
UDG Healthcare buys American, adds Vynamic, Cambridge BioMarketing for up to $67 million (Acquisition trend for healthcare consultancies and marketing)
PharmaTech Innovations/Health 2.0 NYC Wed 19 July –speakers confirmed, reserve now! (The place to be today in NYC)
“Crazy”: StartUp Health’s 2nd Q digital health funding breaks record (Another round of champs and roses! Can it last?)

Last week was busy, including Rock Health’s digital health investment report. The KOMPAÏ French robot is crowdfunding, Jawbone’s Up went Down, microbes are everywhere–and a truly wrenching story of one woman’s loss of telehealth monitoring in Cornwall.

‘Record-shattering’ Q2 for digital health deals: Rock Health’s volte-face (Suddenly it’s wine and roses!)
Jawbone finally T-bones, founder starts Jawbone Health Hub (Up went Down. For the count.)
Connected Health Summit 2017 — Engaging Consumers (San Diego) (The place to be August 29-31)
Conference & Tender Alert: Perth & Kinross TEC event, Flintshire (Wales) tender (UK) (TEC event Sept 26, tender Aug 4)
‘Let me die at home’. The human and financial cost of ending telehealth (Cornwall UK) (A familiar, no less wrenching story to those who’ve worked in telehealth–the books don’t balance)
Weekend reading: the life and spread of microbes in the average hospital room (Scary stuff for those in hospital)
Cerner DoD deployment on time; Coast Guard EHR shopping; Air Force, VA sharing teleICU (Armed Forces and EHRs in motion)
Health tech arrivals (Philips, Roche, VRI, PushDoctor)…and departures (Pact, Jawbone) (Like an airport)
KOMPAÏ seeks €250,000 to develop next gen assistive robot (FR/EU) (Robots in AT move ahead)
 

 


Connected Health Summit

 

 

 

Connected Health Summit: Engaging Consumers analyzes the roles of connected health technologies and innovations in driving changes in consumer behaviors and business models. Now in its fourth year in beautiful San Diego, this event is focused on data-driven, human-centric patient experience and engagement. Keynoters include executives from Aetna, UnitedHealth, ShareCare and Geisinger. Readers save 20 percent! For more information, click on the advert or here.


Petya (or NotPetya) gets NATO’s attention as a possible cyber ‘armed attack’–a must read analysis. The Aussies lead the way on cyberdefense. And a precisely targeted solution to a problem affecting 3 percent of the population traveling with meds.

LifeinaBox: portable refrigeration and monitoring for heat sensitive meds (Another focused solution on an important problem–traveling with your temperature sensitive meds)
Petya/NotPetya compared to an armed attack by a ‘state actor’ by NATO, Ukraine (Impressive analysis by NATO, and Australia’s ASD goes on the offensive)

Petya’s painful debut, telemedicine kicked off summer in a big way, 3rings enters IoT Land. Go to the Islands for telehealth tenders. Theranos settles with Walgreens with the little left in the exchequer. Perhaps Ms Holmes can use a robotic exoskeleton?

Petya no pet as it spreads: is it ransomware or a vicious design for data destruction? 

Telemedicine reduced hospital readmissions by 40% in rural Virginia: UVA study (Substantial results in rural health shown to Senate)
Telemedicine, payment parity finally are ‘perfect together’ in New Jersey (A big win after years of effort)
Tender Alert: Shetland Islands, Ireland (Coming up in July)
3rings smart plug moves to IoT through Amazon Echo (UK) (updated) (UK system expands)
Robotic exoskeletons are…alive! (They’re baaaaak…with a new player in Bionik)
The Theranos Story, ch. 43: Walgreens settles, $54 M in cash draining away (How close are the numbers 11 and 7?)

Articles of continued interest…..
Study doubts benefit of basic blood glucose self-monitoring for non-insulin T2 diabetes (Not encouraging for the Diabetes Monitoring Gold Rush)
Mismanaging a healthcare IT transition: what’s the cost? (Expensive by any metric, especially the customer and long term ones)

Telemedicine may be appropriate for delivering ‘bad news’: study (More research needed)

Ericsson report: will 5G close the healthcare gap from hospitals into the home? (Major study from unexpected source)
The Nightingale-H2020 project for wireless acute care (UK/EU) (Major initiative, get on it before tender)
Behave, Robot! DARPA researchers teaching them some manners. (Rules for those Overrunning Robots and those Self-Driving Cars)

VA says goodbye to VistA, hello to Cerner for new EHR–and possible impacts (Big changes will take years)

In-home video monitoring acceptable to 90 percent of dementia carers: Age NI study (Feelings change in the Selfie Age)
Winston Churchill Memorial Trust – 2018 Travelling Fellowships (Global research grants for UK citizens)
International Conference on Rural and Elderly Health Informatics (Togo, W. Africa) (IREHI, 14-17 December–workshop papers due 25 July)

Successful Aging 2030: how far we haven’t come, how far we have to go (Over a coffee, Editor Donna’s full report from d.health Summit 2017)


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Telehealth & Telecare Aware: covering the news on latest developments in telecare, telehealth, telemedicine and health tech, worldwide–thoughtfully and from the view of fellow professionals

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Donna Cusano, Editor In Chief, donna.cusano@telecareaware.com, @deetelecare

Tender Alerts: Warwickshire, Thurrock, and Hertfordshire

Susanne Woodman of BRE, our Eye on Tenders, alerts our Readers to two open and one probable new tenders:

  • Nuneaton and Bedworth Borough Council (NBBC) in Warwickshire is seeking a 24/7 ‘reactive repair service’ for Tunstall telecare equipment presently in 35 independent living accommodations. The contract is for an initial period of two years, with two optional one-year extensions. Closing is 4 August. Details here.
  • Thurrock Council in Essex is seeking “to appoint a Consultant who will work as Project Manager with Adult Social Care and Health staff to develop an Assistive Technology Strategy and support implementation of the strategy.” The contract is valued at £25-50,000. Interest must be registered by 28 July at the Council’s Delta eSourcing page. On the Council page there is additional information in a summary of the Council’s of the Careline service and a resolution to expand/upgrade assistive technology for local users. 

Not registered as a tender yet is a plan by Hertfordshire County Council to bring wearables such as activity trackers and software-enabled clothing into the homes of at-risk local adults, plus online systems for video-link calls, scheduling messages and reminders for people to take their medication and connect with families. This article in the Watford Observer tells some of the story but the page on the Hertfordshire blog is oddly missing–however, captured by the sharp-eyed Ms. Woodman here. They advise monitoring the Herts County Council on social media–right now they are burning up Twitter @hertscc on the alphabet countdown to potholes and fire safety tips from Reqs the Fire Dog!

Creepy data mining on medical conditions runs wild: where’s the privacy?

Ever heard of AcurianHealth? If you are in the US, you may get a letter for one of their research studies or drug trials based upon your prescriptions, your shopping habits, or your internet browsing. Where do they get that data? Quite legitimately, based on consent, Walgreens Boots will mail invitations for studies organized by Acurian to their pharmacy customers, where the user identification is withheld from Acurian. The privacy policy by which Walgreens does business with you permits this type of contact with you. These letters direct users to a generic sounding website for the study–and then life gets interesting. A visit to the site, whether from a letter, a search, or an online ad, may capture your information. There’s a bit of code from a company they work with, NaviStone, that captures information from partial or unsent information requests or signups. NaviStone then matches it up with what you think is anonymous behavior with other databases, and voilá, mail is sent to you via their ‘proprietary technology.’ Acurian uses databases from large data broker/aggregators like Epsilon and cranks away. It’s creepy behavior that stretches the definition of privacy and consent. Not reassuring is that Acurian has a database of over 100 million people who are supposedly opt-ins. How a Company You’ve Never Heard of Sends You Letters about Your Medical Condition (Gizmodo) Hat tip to Toni Bunting

UDG Healthcare buys American, adds Vynamic, Cambridge BioMarketing for up to $67 million

Consultancy acquisitions the latest trend–who’s next? Dublin’s UDG Healthcare acquired Philadelphia-based healthcare consultancy Vynamic last week, then topped it on Monday with marketing/communications company Cambridge BioMarketing. Cambridge has an unusual specialty–campaigns for orphan and specialty drugs and treatments with clients from small to large pharma and biotech. Vynamic, an industry management consultancy, provides services from strategic planning to process design and systems implementation.

This follows on the reveal earlier this month in Bloomberg of the potential sale of The Advisory Board’s healthcare practice to UnitedHealthcare. Last week, this Editor mentioned Evolent Health in Rock Health’s record-breaking review of first half 2017 funding. It turns out that publicly traded Evolent is partly owned by The Advisory Board, with a share valued at $170 million, and reportedly had been seeking funding to itself purchase The Advisory Board, now considered unlikely (BizJournals). What will happen to this share isn’t known.

The Vynamic acquisition is structured as an initial purchase price of $22 million with an additional consideration of up to $10 million payable over the next three years, based on the usual achievement of agreed profit targets, for a total of $32 million (€27.8 million). Irish Times Vynamic will join UDG’s Ashfield Division. Release For Cambridge, it’s a similar arrangement of $30 million (€26m) paid up front, with the potential for an additional $5 million (€4.3m) paid over the next 12 months, again dependent on achieving financial targets. RTE.ieRelease

PharmaTech Innovations/Health 2.0 NYC Wed 19 July –speakers confirmed, reserve now!

Wednesday, 19 July, 6-8:30 pm at Cohn Resnick LLP, 1301 6th Avenue, NYC

Health 2.0 NYC‘s July event examines innovation in the pharmaceutical business. It’s changing radically, from companies like PillPack which disrupt traditional pharmacies to apps that monitor clinical trials or prescribed as adjuvant therapies. Presenters on Wednesday night include:

  • Dan Conely – Managing Director, NJ Angels, active investor in drug discovery automation
  • Grace Cordovano, PhD – Enlightening Results – CEO and private cancer patient advocate. She founded Enlightening Results, LLC in 2010 to foster private, personalized patient advocacy services.
  • Jodie Gillon – Achillion Pharmaceuticals, Senior Director, Patient Advocacy and Professional Affairs

Early stage companies presenting: ClearRx. Other speakers/presenters to come. 

For $25, you get engaging speakers, beverages, food, and plenty of networking time amongst the like-minded and leaders in health tech! More information and registration on the Health 2.0 NYC Meetup page. (Disclaimer: Editor Donna is an event host and TTA is a long-time sponsor and supporter of Health 2.0 NYC) 

“Crazy”: StartUp Health’s 2nd Q digital health funding breaks record

As predicted, a torrid start to the year. StartUp Health‘s 2nd quarter and first half funding estimate shattered records–$6.5 billion first half, $3.8 billion 2nd quarter compared to $8 bn and 500+ deals in full year 2016. StartUp Health takes a wider sample than Rock Health, tracking over 300 international company deals, including those below $2 million, in service and biotech/diagnostic companies. A change from last year is that there are more Series A than seed deals, concentrating on workflow, big data/analytics, wellness, medical device, and personalized health-Quantified Self companies. Series B deals are well-populated, but there is still a long bridge to C and above. San Francisco and the Bay Area continue to substantially lead in deals made, with Chicago at 39 percent and New York at 25 percent of deal value. They also trumpet the success of their funding family. Watch the video below or download the free report here.

‘Record-shattering’ Q2 for digital health deals: Rock Health’s volte-face

In a pirouette worthy of Nureyev in his prime, Rock Health’s latest Digital Health Funding review for Q2 and the first half of 2017 bangs the drum loudly. With $3.5 bn invested in 188 digital health companies, it’s a record in their tracking. (∗See below for their parameters, which focus on larger fundings and omit others by type.) Q2 reversed the muddling results of Q1 [TTA 11 April] and then some. If the torrid pace is maintained and the market doesn’t take a pratfall, this year will easily surpass 2016’s full year venture funding at $4.3 bn and 304 investments.

Looking at trends, the average deal size has ballooned to $18.7 million from the 2015-16 range of $14 million. Seven $100 million+ deals led the way: Outcome Health, Peloton, Modernizing Medicine, PatientPoint, Alignment Healthcare, PatientsLikeMe, and ShareCare. Of these, three are consumer health information (Outcome, PatientPoint, ShareCare), with PatientsLikeMe closely related with a patient community focus; as the lead category of investment overall, there’s now gold in consumer health. All seven businesses are located outside of Silicon Valley, a refreshing change. A surprise is Modernizing Medicine in the settled (we thought) EHR-clinical workflow category. There’s also an interesting analysis of the shift in top categories from last year to this, which takes out the $100 million+ deals (click to enlarge): click to enlarge

Other changes from the usual: no IPOs and a slowing pace of M&A: 58 this year versus first half 2016’s 87 and full year 146. Their public company index is brighter, with positive gains in first half led by Teladoc (up 110 percent YTD), Care.com (up 80 percent), and consulting favorite Evolent Health (up 70 percent–with United Healthcare’s acquisition of The Advisory Board’s healthcare practice, can an acquisition be far away?). Remaining in the doldrums are NantHealth, Fitbit, and Castlight Health. Rock Health Digital Funding Review First Half 2017

Soon up will be StartUp Health’s first half analysis, which takes a different cut at the companies and looks at the balance of deals by funding series.

∗ Rock Health tracks deals over $2 million in value from venture capital, excluding government and grant funding. They omit non-US deals, even if heavily US funded; healthcare services companies (Oscar), biotech/diagnostic companies (GRAIL), and software companies not solely focused on healthcare (Zenefits), but include fitness companies like Peloton. 

Jawbone finally T-bones, founder starts Jawbone Health Hub (updated)

click to enlargeConfirming the decline of the fitness tracker/wearables business, Jawbone is finally over and done. Their liquidation this week was initially reported by The Information (subscription only) and that co-founder/CEO Hosain Rahman has started a new company, Jawbone Health Hub. JHH will work on medical software and hardware, as well as eventually servicing the buggy existing Jawbone products† which were sold off to a third party last September. JHH is also reportedly hiring many former Jawbone staff and on job boards such as Glassdoor. 

Jawbone’s demise comes after a troubled 18 months, starting with a $165 million private equity raise in January 2016 led by the Kuwait Investment Authority, rumors of financial problems, repositioning into clinical medical monitoring, and abandoning what was left of consumer market support. There is also the continuing saga of court actions with Fitbit over trade secrets, employee poachings, and IP–all additional reasons for the founder to walk away. The only value left in Jawbone is that IP which includes BodyMedia patents and anything left that wasn’t voided by a court. Fitbit shares are also sinking, currently trading at a near 52-week low of just above $5.

‘Death by overfunding’? Updated During its lifetime from wireless audio speaker innovator Aliphcom to wearables leader with the Jawbone UP, Jawbone raised $938 million (Crunchbase), and at one point was valued at $3 billion. An interesting take from a Reuters article was that one consensus among Silicon Valley tech funders was that the company would have been far easier to acquire had it raised less money. Jawbone ranks only behind solar tech Solyndra among largest failures among venture-backed companies. (The difference, of course, was that Jawbone didn’t take $500 million of public stimulus money, as Solyndra did before it failed.)

The words ‘Chapter 7’ have not been included in reports but Sherwood Partners, a busy Mountain View CA financial restructuring company that has wound down plenty of startups through unicorns, was reported to be in charge of the liquidation process plus any remaining legal actions with Fitbit. None of the usual sources have been able to obtain statements from Mr. Rahman and ‘the information’ remains limited. The Verge, TechCrunch, Business Insider 

†Editor Charles’ struggles with seven personal Jawbone UPs were often typical of the user experience.

Connected Health Summit 2017 — Engaging Consumers (San Diego)

29-31 August, The Omni Hotel, San Diego

click to enlargeTake a trip to Southern California for the end of the traditional summer season (sob!). This year’s Connected Health Summit, organized by research organization Parks Associates, spotlights health technologies as part of the Internet of Things (IoT) and the transformational impact of these connected solutions on the US healthcare system. Presentations are organized around:

  • Remote health monitoring for accountable care
  • Consumer-centric wellness and fitness solutions
  • Independent living technologies and services
  • Innovative virtual/convenience care models

Keynoters include 

  • Saquib Rahim MD, MBA, Chief Medical Officer, Aetna
  • Vidya Raman-Tangella, Senior Vice President, and Head, UHC Innovation Center of Excellence, UnitedHealth Group
  • Dale Rayman, Senior Vice President, Actuarial Consulting & Business Development, Sharecare
  • Chanin Wendling, AVP, Informatics, Geisinger Health System

For more information and to save 20 percent, click on the Connected Health Summit’s advert at the top of this page. Telehealth & Telecare Aware is pleased once again to be a media supporter of CHS 2017. Twitter at #CONNHealth17

Conference & Tender Alert: Perth & Kinross TEC event, Flintshire (Wales) tender (UK)

Susanne Woodman of BRE, our Eye on Tenders, alerts our Readers to a Scotland TEC conference and a Wales tender.

The Perth & Kinross Technology-Enabled Care Conference will take place on Tuesday 26 Sept at Perth Concert Hall. It’s expected to have an attendance of about 120 people from across the social and health care area. Sponsorship packages are available to about 20 organizations. See details on Public Contracts Scotland. Email TEC@pkc.gov.uk 

In Wales, the Flintshire County Council is seeking a telecare emergency alarm  system with 24-hour telephone support. Flintshire currently operates 70 sheltered housing developments with 2613 units, currently connected to a call handling system provided by Jontek. Tenders are due 4 August. Information on Sell2Wales. Contact dawn.kent@flintshire.gov.uk 

‘Let me die at home’. The human and financial cost of ending telehealth (Cornwall UK)-update

See below for ITV coverage. Jill Diggett, a resident of Bodmin in Cornwall, is one of undoubtedly many local people losing their telehealth monitoring next week. A business decision was made to abandon telehealth monitoring provided by NHS Kernow, whose statement is extensively cited by this article in Cornwall Live. NHS Kernow, which is £54 million in the red, cites “the service did not have significantly robust clinical evidence for effectiveness and did not demonstrate the desired outcomes that we would expect to see.” The Cornwall Partnership NHS Foundation Trust, which provides the service, will hand it off in advance to the telehealth user’s GP, and will provide community services or getting a helper to manage their condition.  

From this article, Mrs. Diggett is 1) an exception to their findings and 2) the handoff appears to have been dropped. Mrs. Diggett has five serious chronic conditions. She is on oxygen. Last December, she was in hospital for three weeks. Post-discharge, she was given telecare and telehealth monitoring of her vital signs (weight, blood oxygen, blood pressure), performed by her husband and sent to a care coordinator (a ‘medical expert’ in the article). There’s medical intervention if things trend poorly. However, she has stayed out of hospital since and is presented here as medically stable, though not doing handsprings. In the article, Mrs. Diggett expresses despair and real fear that she will be taken from her home and wind up back in hospital where she assumes she will die, an understandably emotional reaction. Worse, her husband gives no indication that his wife’s care has been transitioned. 

Readers of Cornwall Live are also pointed to the closure of a Bodmin treatment centre in March. So the Diggetts will be traveling much farther to receive care if they were using it.

Mr. Diggett was told that the average cost of a hospital bed is £1,000 a night. For 21 nights, that is £21,000. Let’s assume that the fully allocated cost (devices and monitoring) of the telehealth service is £100/month. That is 210 months–17.5 years–of monitoring for the cost of one hospital stay. If it is £250/month, that is 84 months or 7 years.

What is not cost-calculable but has consequences? Mrs. Diggett’s state of mind and her husband’s quality of life. Her predicament is shared by patients and caregivers who had telehealth or telecare withdrawn after a pilot or the ending of an at-home program. There is a feeling of abandonment, that they don’t have this help or support, no one is listening, the safety net’s been taken away, and they are all alone again. Anyone who has worked for telehealth and telecare companies, such as this Editor, knows this is an unavoidable consequence of service withdrawal unless that person is much better or is transitioned properly, which almost never happens. Readers on both sides of the Atlantic will surely be able to supply their own examples where the books don’t balance. Hat tip to Susanne Woodman, our Eye on Tenders.

Update: ITV last night (11 July) reported on this here, interviewing the Diggetts. Bravo!

Weekend reading: the life and spread of microbes in the average hospital room

We in healthcare and health tech know how deadly nosocomial or hospital-acquired infections are. Current CDC estimates are that in US hospitals, there are 1.7 million infections and 99,000 associated deaths each year (up from a previous estimate of 75,000) PatientCareLink. Most of us know that visiting a patient in a hospital room means also making sure hands are washed, clothes and shoes are clean, and that we bring a container of industrial strength bleach wipes for cleaning surfaces versus flowers.

However, it was news to this Editor that few studies have been done on the actual hospital room environment–the microbiome–and how the microbes in the room interact with the patient and the staff.  Sue Barnes, an RN who spent 30 years as the National Leader for Infection Prevention for Kaiser Permanente, reviews a newly published study in Science Translational Medicine (24 May, abstract available only). The study collected bacterial cultures from the ‘patient zone’ around the bed, every surface in the hospital room, and swabbed the hands and noses of patients and staff, along with the shoes, shirts, and cell phones of staff members. The problem is much more complex than simple cleaning.

  • Patient skin and the microbial makeup of room surfaces became more similar over time. Non-ambulatory patients were less so, as they had less contact with external surfaces.
  • The longer patients were in the room, the more genetic resistance to antibiotics the organisms acquired. This is despite the lack of association with antibiotics save topicals. The author suggests that regular cleaning may be the reason–only the strongest survive.
  • The hospital room is most threating to the most vulnerable, such as babies in a neonatal ICU
  • “In the Lax study, several bacterial samples taken more than 71 days apart were identical,  (more…)

Cerner DoD deployment on time; Coast Guard EHR shopping; Air Force, VA sharing teleICU

The US Department of Defense announced that the deployment of Cerner’s EHR MHS Genesis at the Naval Hospital in Oak Harbor, Washington is on time for later this month. It’s a little unusual that anything this big and in the government is actually on time. It’s also meaningful for VA, as they are adopting MHS Genesis in an equally, if not longer, rollout [TTA 7 June]. Healthcare IT News

Less well known is the Coast Guard‘s dropping its costly six-year deployment of the Epic EHR last year and reverting to paper. They are not in the MHS Genesis rollout because the CG is part of the Department of Homeland Security, despite its service roots and structure similar to the US Navy. This has led to much speculation that their final choice will be DoD’s Cerner platform, although the OpenEMR Consortium has already answered their April RFI.

And even less noticed was the late June announcement that the US Air Force Medical Operations Agency and the VA are implementing a tele-ICU sharing arrangement, giving the USAF access to the VA’s capabilities at five AF locations: Las Vegas; Hampton, Virginia; Biloxi, Mississippi; Dayton, Ohio; and Anchorage, Alaska. The VA central tele-ICU facility is in Minneapolis. Doctors there can remotely consult, prescribe medications, order procedures and make diagnoses through live electronic monitoring. Becker’s Hospital Review, VA press release

Health tech arrivals (Philips, Roche, VRI, PushDoctor)…and departures (Pact, Jawbone)

click to enlargeThis popular vacation week has been filled with ‘money under the wire’ news of acquisitions, investments…and one high-profile owner shuttering a pioneering activity app.

Acquisitions:

Philips Healthcare added London-based pregnancy app developer Health & Parenting for an undisclosed sum. Its most popular app is Pregnancy + (and ++), with 12 million downloads via the Apple Store and Google Play, but others are Baby + for all things baby-rearing, and Baby Name Genius to Find That Ideal Name. It will fold into and diversify Philips’ existing uGrow digital parenting platform which includes the Avent smart baby monitor and smart ear thermometer and leverages the open infrastructure of Philips’ Health Suite Digital Platform. One wonders at the flood of data flowing from these apps to these devices and what Philips will do with all these points. Release, MedCityNews

Roche acquired Austrian partner mySugr, a management tool that promises to ‘make diabetes suck less’. Last year they added Roche’s Accu-Chek Connect blood glucose monitor to its chosen device connect and sync list. mySugr features an app for users to log their meals, exercise, glucose levels, and mood. It also captures pictures of user snacks and unleashes “a diabetes monster” avatar when the food choices are poor based on their glucose levels. Terms were not disclosed. MedCityNews

Telecare/monitoring company VRI quietly acquired Healthcom from Woodbridge International. Healthcom’s primary area is care transition management using medical alerts, telehealth, and medication management for payers, government agencies and care partners. Originally positioned as a partnership June 30 on VRI’s website, Globe Newswire confirmed the sale a week later. Terms (again) were not disclosed.

Mobihealthnews rounded up 24 major acquisitions, including GreatCall (by GTCR) and Best Doctors (Teladoc)–all by June 30!

Investments:

Manchester’s PushDoctor telemedicine app raised $26.1 million in Series B financing from Accelerated Digital Ventures and Draper Esprit plus Oxford Capital Partners, Partech Ventures, and Seventure Partners. This added to their $10.1 million Series A raise in January 2016. PushDoctor connects UK patients with NHS-registered GPs for virtual visits costing only £20. Unlike US-based tele-docs, Push Doctor issues prescriptions, makes doctor-led referrals to other health providers and specialists, and helps manage repeat prescriptions. Their founder also has an eye on managing long-term conditions, short-term illnesses, fitness, and nutrition. Their major UK competitors are Babylon Health (which recently raised £50 million for its triage app), Ada Health, and Your.MD. Crunchbase, TechCrunch, Mobihealthnews

And shutterings:

Pioneering fitness incentive app Pact (founded 2011) announced its closing by end of August. Originally a ‘get thee to the gym’ app, it branched out into healthy food (eat more vegetables!) and tracking meals with MyFitnessPal. Pact never truly emerged from seed funding. A rare stumble by Khosla Ventures, which led a 2014 bag-of-skittles round of $1.5 million. Mobihealthnews, Crunchbase

Jawbone closed out the week by liquidating and transubstantiating into Jawbone Health Hub. More on this here